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Politics Opinion: Trump 2024? It could happen

13:55  27 november  2020
13:55  27 november  2020 Source:   cnn.com

President Trump stays mostly out of view after election but is working, taking steps to, in part, poke Biden

  President Trump stays mostly out of view after election but is working, taking steps to, in part, poke Biden Trump has been mostly out of view since Election Day but is working: He is purging staff and pursuing actions designed in part to irk Joe Biden.President Donald Trump has stayed mostly out of public view in the two weeks since his election loss to Democrat Joe Biden. On nine of the 14 days since the Nov. 3 election, his daily schedule has been summed up in a single sentence: “The president has no public events scheduled" – the longest he has been out of public view since taking office in January 2017.

Opinions • Opinion . Here’s what could happen to put Trump in the lead. The second lane could be called the Restoration Crew. These candidates will essentially run as people who represent pre- Trump party factions seeking to gloss over the interregnum with claims of fealty to the departed

So if Donald Trump loses the 2020 presidential election, nothing stops Trump would be 78 years old on the next presidential Election Day — roughly the same age as Joe “And I think the Republicans would step aside and let it happen . Lanza’s statements were made to BBC Radio’s Today program.

Will he, or won't he?

Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 14: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the American Airlines Center on September 14, 2015 in Dallas, Texas. More than 20,000 tickets have been distributed for the event. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images) © Tom Pennington/Getty Images North America/Getty Images DALLAS, TX - SEPTEMBER 14: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the American Airlines Center on September 14, 2015 in Dallas, Texas. More than 20,000 tickets have been distributed for the event. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

"He" is Donald Trump. The question refers to his plans for the 2024 election. According to the Washington Post, the lame duck president is considering a campaign to retake the Oval Office in 2024. Given how many Republicans undoubtedly would like the idea, even the most surprising element in the Post's report -- that Trump could announce his bid by the end of this year --- cannot be dismissed out of hand.

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Trump 's former acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney says the president isn't ready to bow out of Trump has no plans to immediately concede election as biden leads in American elections can be ugly, he said, "kind of like making sausage. No one wants to see it happen

As it 's become increasingly clear that Donald Trump needs the equivalent of a triple bank shot to win a second term, the President and his closest allies have already begun to prepare the justification for why he "has" to run again in 2024 . Don't worry @realDonaldTrump will fight & they can watch as usual!"

Smart money would bet that Trump will at least gesture toward 2024 sometime soon. The reasons for this, beyond the poll numbers, must include the frame of mind reflected in his refusal to concede his 2020 defeat and his devotion to the wild notion that he was somehow cheated out of a second term.

Beyond mere pig-headedness, Trump's go-down-with-the-ship pose aligns with his political brand, which emphasizes the notion that he is unconventional, combative and relentless. It also allows him to shift from one powerful mythic native, that of the "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" outsider who would "drain the swamp" of politics, to a new one that would make him a noble victim who, like the movie character Rocky, bravely returns to the ring.

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Lanza added that Trump "would be younger than Biden is now" if he ran again in 2024 . "And there's nobody in the Republican party that can challenge President Trump in the primaries." In another interview with CNBC, Lanza said that he "wouldn't be surprised to see him on the ticket in 2024 " if he

President Trump and family during the Republican National Convention in August. (Jonathan Newton /The Washington Post). Opinion by. If Trump desires the drama of a 2024 comeback, it begins with Republican success in Georgia in January. His have been a transformative four years in the White

The movie comparisons are apt because the President is, among other things, a gifted dramatist who spoke of "central casting" cabinet picks and reportedly considered wearing a "Superman" shirt when he left Walter Reed after getting treated for Covid-19.

If he chooses to pose as a defeated fighter who would fight again, Trump could also tap potentially enormous supplies of two things he craves: attention and money. The attention would be offered by the media as he careens around the country conducting campaign-style rallies that would draw crowds eager to hear his insult-laden oldies -- "Crooked Hillary" and "Socialist Democrats" -- and new material aimed both at President-elect Joe Biden and anyone who might challenge Trump in a prospective Republic primary.

Money could flow to Trump if he sells tickets to his rallies and reaps profits from sales of official merchandise. More could come in the form of donations to political action committees that he would control. The President has already sent out numerous email and text-message fundraising pitches for a committee called Save America. While some of the money has been used to fund Trump's legal battle over the 2020 vote, most of it is now reportedly going toward future political activity.

Trump Could Push Don Jr. and Ivanka in 2024, but Trumpism Is a Hard Sell Without Him

  Trump Could Push Don Jr. and Ivanka in 2024, but Trumpism Is a Hard Sell Without Him The president's children have been touted as potential successors should he not choose to run himself again in the future.While the presidential election has been called in Joe Biden's favor—Trump continues to reject this, dismissing the judgement of the "lamestream media"—the Republican incumbent received more votes than any sitting commander-in-chief in history.

With President Trump 's chances of staying in the White House dwindling, the Republican party potentially faces a vacuum as it works out who might be the GOP's new leader and standard bearer in 2024 . Tucker Carlson. Fox News opinion host.

President Donald Trump is plotting another White House run in 2024 . He's also floating wild theories He's asked whether Republican state legislatures could pick pro- Trump electors who would in turn give him a What happens then is impossible to say: the Supreme Court could try to rule between them

But a caveat: While Trump would find many financial and ego-boosting reasons to run, he could risk a civil war within the GOP triggered by those Republicans who have paid their dues and waited patiently for their turn at a presidential run.

One thing that is certain: Trump redux would offer the country a spectacle not seen before and for which we have no model.

Now consigned to the small club of presidents who failed to win reelection, Trump needs a new predecessor to emulate. In the past, Trump has indicated that his Oval Office role model was Andrew Jackson, the populist who served two successive terms and whose cruel treatment of native tribes found echoes in Trump's treatment of undocumented immigrants.

But perhaps the only available facsimile for a possible future presidency is Grover Cleveland, who served two non-consecutive terms, as the 22nd and 24th president -- even though this is hardly a good fit. Unlike Trump, Cleveland served a long political apprenticeship as a sheriff, mayor, and governor. Also, Cleveland won the popular vote in each of the three elections he entered. (The middle one he lost in the electoral college.) Trump lost the popular vote to Hillary Clinton by nearly three million and to Biden by double that number.

Would Trump risk the ignominy of a third presidential campaign in which the majority might reject him? This answer would be moot if he used a 2024 effort to distract from future events (like his legal troubles) or if health issues render his effort untenable.

Either way, the Trump '24 notion could well confer short-term rewards for his wallet and his ego, which, his record suggests, he cannot resist.

Potential 2024 Republicans flock to Georgia amid Senate runoffs .
Georgia is emerging as an early proving ground for the 2024 presidential race, with a handful of potential Republican hopefuls flocking to the state to test their political coattails in its two Senate runoffs.Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.), who just landed the chairmanship at the National Republican Senatorial Committee, is among the prospective 2024 contenders who have visited Georgia in recent weeks. So are Sens. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and Vice President Pence. The flurry of visits by national political players isn't unexpected.

usr: 0
This is interesting!