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Politics The plan we need before a vaccine

16:25  28 november  2020
16:25  28 november  2020 Source:   thehill.com

COVID vaccine candidate from Pfizer must be stored at minus 112, prompting a rush on dry ice

  COVID vaccine candidate from Pfizer must be stored at minus 112, prompting a rush on dry ice At minus 112, exposed skin freezes almost instantly. It’s also the temperature required to store what’s expected to be the first COVID-19 vaccine. Your browser does not support this video With last week's news that the vaccine candidate from Pfizer and its collaborator BioNTech was more than 90% effective and could be approved within a month, the reality of moving and storing the life-saving vials came into sharp focus.  © Gehm & Sons A scoop of dry ice pellets from Gehm & Sons, a fifth generation ice making company based in Akron, Ohio.

"You need to have the transportation plan in place." The province could look at promoting immunization, similar to flu shots or the H1N1 vaccine in There will likely be strong messaging urging people to get vaccinated , Neudorf said. Muharajine cited recent survey data that suggest the public

“ We really need to make patients aware that this is not going to be a walk in the park,” Fryhofer said during a virtual meeting with the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, or ACIP, an outside group of medical experts that advise the CDC. “They are going to know they had a vaccine .

Thanksgiving is the first in a line of holidays that Americans celebrate by gathering with people we love. If you agonized over whether or not it was safe to be with others on Thursday, you're probably struggling with how to handle the December holidays, too.

a person sitting on a table: coronavirus COVID-19 community spread u.s. centers for disease control and prevention CDC test kits diagnostic 33 percent fail rate failure approved lindstrom stepehen respiratory quality control © iStock coronavirus COVID-19 community spread u.s. centers for disease control and prevention CDC test kits diagnostic 33 percent fail rate failure approved lindstrom stepehen respiratory quality control

A recent survey indicated that two in five Americans planned to attend large gatherings over Thanksgiving weekend, and 27 percent said they wouldn't take precautions like wearing masks or social distancing. We already know that up to 80 percent of infected people experience no or mild symptoms, so these gatherings threaten to further exacerbate the out-of-control spread of COVID-19. These numbers have many of us wishing there were a better way.

Pfizer and Moderna: How 2 very different companies developed a COVID vaccine

  Pfizer and Moderna: How 2 very different companies developed a COVID vaccine Pfizer and Moderna are likely to be the first companies to see their respective vaccines authorized in the United States. Though their journeys to a COVID-19 vaccine have been eerily similar, the companies themselves could not be more different. Pfizer is a multinational pharmaceutical giant, while Moderna is a small biotechnology company that has never brought a drug to the market.

GPs are advised to plan to vaccinate those over 80 who are not living in a care home from 4 A letter sent to GP practices said "there is a need to plan for the earliest possible commencement" It advises that patients receiving the vaccine will require "15 minutes of direct observation" following the injection.

Vaccination ingredients. Vaccines teach your immune system to recognize a particular virus or bacterium so that it can defeat it should your body encounter the disease The CDC recommends women who plan to become pregnant receive an MMR vaccine before becoming pregnant.

There is. It's called surveillance testing, and it can help you and yours stay safe for the many months ahead before a vaccine is widely available.

We know it works because we and many of our colleagues across the nation have designed and implemented high-sensitivity, low-cost surveillance testing on our campuses and in their surrounding communities. By repeatedly testing everyone and rapidly isolating those infected, virus transmission on campus can be almost eliminated and the prevalence of infection reduced dramatically. What's more, our tests cost about $15 each.

You might wonder why this proven, scalable, inexpensive, state-of-the-art surveillance testing program hasn't been rolled out for every American. After all, there are 262 Carnegie-classified, high-level research universities like ours in the U.S., with locations in every state, Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico that could rapidly expand testing capacity. Wouldn't a national surveillance program prevent thousands of deaths, get our kids back to school and open our restaurants?

Doctors and nurses want more data before championing vaccines to end the pandemic

  Doctors and nurses want more data before championing vaccines to end the pandemic Health-care leaders say they are finding unexpected wariness among medical workers about taking the novel vaccines, based on concerns about President Trump’s politicization of the government’s reviews, their rapid development under Operation Warp Speed, and a lack of information about longer-term safety and effectiveness. Large health systems, medical societies and the federal government are launching an effort to persuade front-line health care providers to take novel vaccines that were developed, and are likely to be granted emergency approval, in record time.

Vaccine providers will receive vaccines from CDC’s centralized distributor or directly from a Establishing and testing logistics plans with manufacturers and commercial partners that are part of Experts need to understand more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide before

A preliminary plan devised by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this spring gives If shortages happen, most of the nation will have no chance to get the initial lots of a vaccine They, too, will need a fair system of distribution. One solution that is starting to attract the attention of Dr. White and his colleagues were considering a weighted lottery before the remdesivir shortage began.

We think it would. What we need is a national strategy for surveillance testing. Here are four things the government would have to do to make this happen:

One: Designate a specific surveillance laboratory certification for COVID-19 testing. Right now, the existing regulatory framework is designed for clinical diagnostic labs that need to run many types of tests. Research labs like ours, however, are running a single test with a few slight variations with extreme competence and precision. The regulatory expectation in an emergency like ours should be to demonstrate competence and accuracy in running a test, not to develop the infrastructure needed for a full-service clinical diagnostic laboratory.

Two: An easy, convenient, safe and self-service sampling process, like the way we do it on our campuses. Individuals should be able to pick up a sample kit, collect their own sample and drop it off at a collection point.

Vaccines Won't Stop the Pandemic Unless at Least 50 Million Skeptical Americans Change Their Minds

  Vaccines Won't Stop the Pandemic Unless at Least 50 Million Skeptical Americans Change Their Minds More than four in 10 Americans say they won't get the COVID vaccine when it becomes available. Big problem: Even a highly effective vaccine won't do much to rein in the pandemic if enough people can't be persuaded to get the shot.It would be hard to exaggerate the degree to which experts have been surprised, and relieved, by these preliminary results. Early in the pandemic, conventional wisdom held that the best we could hope for was a slightly better hit rate than seasonal influenza vaccines, which in a good year protect 50 to 60 percent of those inoculated; the Food and Drug Administration set the target for COVID vaccines at a modest 50 percent.

If an effective vaccine or drug doesn’t materialise, we will need a Plan B that uses only non-drug interventions. What about research for Plan B? To prepare for the future and Plan B, the case where a vaccine doesn’t arrive, we need to conduct randomised trials into non-drug interventions to prevent

No vaccine has gone from the drawing board to being proven highly effective in such a short period of time. There are still huge challenges ahead, but the How effective could it be? A vaccine - alongside better treatments - is seen as the best way of getting out of the restrictions that have been imposed on

Three: Laboratories certified to conduct surveillance testing must be allowed to report test results to individuals and have those results centrally aggregated and accessible to health departments. Currently, research labs performing surveillance testing cannot inform a participant of their positive result. Instead, they can only recommend seeking a confirmatory test performed in a clinical diagnostic laboratory. This is a positive result disguised with a wink and a nod.

Four: Funding. While the CARES Act covers the cost of clinical diagnostic testing at $100 for symptomatic or exposed uninsured Americans, it does not provide reimbursement for those $15 surveillance tests. Consider this: A single week of enhanced benefits under the Pandemic Unemployment Act was $600. If the government added just one week's payment per person to the next relief package, every American's weekly $15 test would be covered for 10 months. Experts have estimated that we should see widespread vaccine distribution within just six months.

A national surveillance program, testing 330 million Americans weekly for the next six months, is achievable. It would allow us to open our schools, get back to work and feel safe in our communities again. Perhaps most importantly, it would let us gather with our families in the new year. And the cost, at about $129 billion, would be a fraction of the economic burden we face without such a national plan.

Michael Kotlikoff is provost of Cornell University and a professor of molecular physiology. Jack Lipton is a professor and founding chair of translational neuroscience at Michigan State University.

Pressure builds on Congress to help states with Covid-19 vaccine distribution .
With federal health officals meeting to discuss who gets the coronavirus vaccine first, pressure is building on Congress to strike an agreement not only for aid for jobless Americans, but for cash-strapped states that say they need assistance to ensure the vaccine is equitably and effectively distributed. © MANDEL NGAN/AFP/AFP/Getty Images The dome of the US Capitol is seen in Washington, DC on March 27, 2019.

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