•   
  •   
  •   

Politics Poll: Most Republicans believe Trump bears no responsibility for Capitol attacks

02:40  17 january  2021
02:40  17 january  2021 Source:   vox.com

What is sedition? US Capitol breach was 'almost textbook' example, legal expert says

  What is sedition? US Capitol breach was 'almost textbook' example, legal expert says Seditious conspiracy is a federal charge punishable by up to 20 years in prison, and law experts believe the charge fits Capitol rioters.The U.S. center of power became a scene of outright chaos Wednesday as supporters made their way past barricades, broke in through windows and sent representatives into hiding during a session of debate over election certification. The assault on the Capitol came shortly after a rally for the president, who continued to levy baseless claims that the election was rigged and told the crowd they would "never concede.

Americans think President Donald Trump bears responsibility for the attack on the U.S. Capitol and that he should be Less than a third—28 percent—of Americans said he bears no responsibility at all. Ten Republicans joined Democrats in approving the impeachment, signaling a shift in the

After Trump , respondents most blamed congressional Republicans , with 52 percent saying they were at least “somewhat” responsible . A historic first: the Confederate battle flag inside the U.S. Capitol . Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty ImagesConfederate soldiers never reached the Capitol during the Civil War.

An overwhelming majority of Americans disapprove of the storming of the US Capitol on January 6, but most Republicans say President Donald Trump bears no responsibility for the assault — and nearly half say Republican lawmakers didn’t go far enough in supporting the president’s efforts to overturn the election’s results, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll.

a motorcycle parked in front of a crowd: Trump flags fly as supporters of President Donald Trump occupy the steps of the US Capitol. © Shay Horse/NurPhoto/Getty Images Trump flags fly as supporters of President Donald Trump occupy the steps of the US Capitol.

The poll — which surveys 1,002 US adults, and was taken from January 10 to 13 — paints a striking picture, and finds a national consensus on the impropriety of what transpired at the Capitol, while revealing familiar divisions on who is to blame for the episode.

Fact check: False claim of facial recognition of antifa members during U.S. Capitol riot

  Fact check: False claim of facial recognition of antifa members during U.S. Capitol riot Facial recognition software firm XRVision has refuted a now-retracted story that its product matched rioters at the U.S. Capitol to members of antifa.A mob of violent Trump supporters swarmed the Capitol, interrupting a joint congressional session to certify the 2020 election results, USA TODAY reported.

57 percent of Americans say Trump bears a great deal or good amount of responsibility for the assault on the Capitol . On these questions, independents are far more in sync with the broader public: In this poll , support for what Trump did is largely a Republican phenomenon.

But the President is still not taking responsibility for his part in inciting the crowd that attacked the Capitol last week. CBS News White House correspondent Paula Reid has more . In a video posted on social media Wednesday, President Trump did not acknowledge the U.S. House's historic

The poll found that almost 9 in 10 Americans oppose the storming of the Capitol, and that 80 percent strongly oppose the attack.

But when asked about who is to blame — and what, if any, repercussions Trump should face for promoting a “wild” rally that eventually overran the country’s legislature and resulted in the deaths of five people — there is nothing approaching consensus.

While majorities of the public disapprove of the president’s behavior, Trump still retains a large degree of support from Republicans, as does his disinformation campaign to discredit the 2020 election results.

The poll found 56 percent of Americans believe that Congress should remove Trump from office and prevent him from holding elected office in the future. But among Republicans, 89 percent oppose such a course of action.

Could Donald Trump, Rudy Giuliani face charges of inciting mob violence in Capitol riots?

  Could Donald Trump, Rudy Giuliani face charges of inciting mob violence in Capitol riots? Legal experts say President Donald Trump and attorney Rudy Giuliani could face criminal charges for inciting the riots on Capitol Hill.The president's comments came shortly before a pro-Trump mob bashed through barricades, windows and doors, injuring police officers and temporarily occupying the Capitol building in a show of force tied to their anger over false allegations of election fraud.

The President bears responsibility for Wednesday's attack on Congress by mob rioters. But many Republican members of Congress are afraid to speak out against Trump because they fear Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.), last week's Capitol attack became even scarier when she got to her office.As

Seven in 10 say Donald Trump bears some responsibility for the U.S. Capitol attack , according to a new ABC News/Washington Post poll . The challenge for the Republicans , in what may or not be their post- Trump era, is how to straddle that continued in-party approval for the president with views

The reason for that appears to be straightforward: The pollsters found most Republicans don’t think he did anything wrong.


Video: What Trump did 'was unforgivable' -Rep. McGovern (Reuters - US Video Online)

While 66 percent of Americans believe Trump has acted irresponsibly in his statements and actions since the election, 66 percent of Republicans think he acted responsibly, according to the poll.

While 57 percent of Americans believe Trump bears a great deal or good amount of responsibility for the violent attack, 56 percent of Republicans say Trump bears no responsibility — and another 22 percent say he bears some. As The Post’s Greg Sargent puts it in his analysis of the poll’s results, among Republicans, that means 78 percent of Republicans at least partially exonerate the president.

A large percentage of Republicans also feel GOP leaders should in fact have gone further in their efforts to back Trump’s bid to overturn the election results. While 52 percent of Americans believe GOP leaders went too far in supporting Trump’s (false) claims about the election results, 48 percent of Republicans said they did not go far enough.

Inauguration Day 2021: What now? Capitol riots, Trump supporter threats prompt safety concerns

  Inauguration Day 2021: What now? Capitol riots, Trump supporter threats prompt safety concerns The inauguration of a new president, set for Jan. 20, typically poses one of the most enormous security challenges. What does that mean after a riot?The inauguration of a new president, set for Jan. 20, typically poses one of the most enormous security challenges for the federal government and local police, as former presidents and foreign dignitaries gather to observe what – until Wednesday – represented the peaceful transfer of power at the very Capitol that was overrun.

More importantly, Trump did not specify what the “orderly transition” means. He didn’t say there would be a Republican North Carolina Gallagher Republican Wisconsin Garbarino Republican New York Gonzales, Tony Truth Publishing assumes no responsibility for the use or misuse of this material.

Most recently, he came out strongly against impeaching Trump .In a statement Wednesday, Graham echoed fellow Republican lawmakers who argue impeachment would only further divide the country, since Trump is heading out of office soon anyway.Graham criticized Democrats for moving forward

A similar divide is also apparent in the poll’s results on whether Trump should be held legally liable for the attack. Most Americans think he should be criminally charged for his role; only 1 in 8 Republicans agree.

These findings of Republicans as reluctant to assign blame to Trump match trends in other surveys. As Vox’s Sean Collins wrote in an analysis of polling conducted immediately after the Capitol Hill attack, considerable portions of Republicans are inclined to believe that the riot was not only not Trump’s fault, but actually something Democrats should be blamed for.

“Instead of placing the insurrection at Trump’s feet, 52 percent of Republicans told YouGov that it was actually Biden’s fault; 42 percent of Republicans told Morning Consult the same — and 48 percent of Republicans told Morning Consult that Democrats in Congress were also to blame,” Collins wrote last week.

Trump’s support appears to be faltering — not collapsing

There are, however, signs that a significant set of Republicans are skeptical that Trump is the right leader for their party going forward. According the new Washington Post-ABC News poll, fewer than 6 in 10 Republicans and Republican-leaning independents say party leaders should follow Trump’s lead in the future, while 35 percent say they should move away from Trump — “a sentiment that has roughly doubled from 18 percent in 2018.”

Capitol Police officer Howard Liebengood, 51, dies days after riot; remembered as 'selfless,' 'kind'

  Capitol Police officer Howard Liebengood, 51, dies days after riot; remembered as 'selfless,' 'kind' Howard Charles Liebengood, 51, was a 15-year veteran of the Capitol Police. He was on duty during the Jan. 6 riot, but it's not clear if that was related to his death.Howard Charles Liebengood, 51, was assigned to the Senate Division and had been with the Capitol Police since April 2005.

Conservatives’ lingering commitment to Trump poses significant dilemmas for Republicans after Trump leaves office. Of late, Trump has taken a somewhat adversarial stance against certain segments of his party, threatening to back the primary opponents of lawmakers he does not like. Establishment Republicans are worried that a Trump-fueled split in the party could damage their prospects as they prepare for midterm elections.

And some Republican lawmakers find Trump’s political style unpredictable, overly transgressive of political norms, and a distraction from their policy agenda. This is reportedly part of why Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is said to be contemplating voting to convict Trump in a Senate impeachment trial and why some Republicans are already working to defeat Trump-style candidates in the 2022 elections.

But, as this poll demonstrates, Trump still has the enthusiastic support of many in the GOP. Regardless of how top lawmakers in the party may view him, they could risk alienating their own base if they try to move too far away from him, or sanction him.

Impeachment, resignation, 25th Amendment: How Democrats in Congress are trying to remove Trump after Capitol riots .
Democrats in Congress have urged Trump to resign and for the Cabinet to remove him using the 25th Amendment. Now they're preparing for impeachment.They've called for his resignation, urged the Cabinet to remove him under the 25th Amendment and, with those two options looking extremely unlikely, are preparing to impeach the president for a second time.

usr: 0
This is interesting!