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Politics Rove: Chances of conviction rise if Giuliani represents Trump in Senate impeachment trial

17:50  17 january  2021
17:50  17 january  2021 Source:   thehill.com

Could Donald Trump, Rudy Giuliani face charges of inciting mob violence in Capitol riots?

  Could Donald Trump, Rudy Giuliani face charges of inciting mob violence in Capitol riots? Legal experts say President Donald Trump and attorney Rudy Giuliani could face criminal charges for inciting the riots on Capitol Hill.The president's comments came shortly before a pro-Trump mob bashed through barricades, windows and doors, injuring police officers and temporarily occupying the Capitol building in a show of force tied to their anger over false allegations of election fraud.

Republican strategist Karl Rove suggested on Sunday that President Trump is at higher risk of the Senate voting to convict the president in his second impeachment trial if Trump 's personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani , spearheads his defense.

The House of Representatives first impeached Donald Trump in late 2019 for abusing power and obstructing Congress amid claims he pressured And that's basically incitement," Giuliani said. According to Giuliani , if the attempt to dismiss the impeachment article were to be unsuccessful, one

Republican strategist Karl Rove suggested on Sunday that President Trump is at higher risk of the Senate voting to convict the president in his second impeachment trial if Trump's personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, spearheads his defense.

a man wearing glasses talking on a cell phone: Rove: Chances of conviction rise if Giuliani represents Trump in Senate impeachment trial © Getty Images Rove: Chances of conviction rise if Giuliani represents Trump in Senate impeachment trial

Rove said during a "Fox News Sunday" appearance that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's (R-Ky.) statements on the trial, in which he did not instruct Senate Republicans to vote against conviction, are "a sign that every Republican senator needs to take this seriously."

'Never too late': Trump's second impeachment comes quickly compared to months-long investigation into Ukraine

  'Never too late': Trump's second impeachment comes quickly compared to months-long investigation into Ukraine House Democrats impeached President Trump for a second time only a week after the crime alleged, compared to a months-long probe for his first case.House Democrats began investigating Trump across six committees after regaining control of the chamber in January 2019. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., declared a formal impeachment inquiry in September 2019. The House impeached Trump that December and the Senate acquitted Trump in February 2020.

Senate votes against calling new witnesses in Trump 's impeachment trial . The House voted to impeach Trump in December on two articles, abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, both stemming from Trump 's handling of the U.S. relationship with Ukraine.

Representing a client inside a courtroom for the first time in nearly three decades, Rudy Giuliani showed some rust as he tried to make the case that President Trump has been robbed of reelection.

"I think it's all going to boil down to what the president's defense is," Rove added.

"Rudy Giuliani charted a very bad course in the morning papers," Rove said, pointing to comments by Giuliani suggesting the president could not have incited the deadly riots at the Capitol earlier this month because his unproven claims of election theft were true. The House last week impeached Trump over his role in the rioting, making him the only president to be impeached twice.

The election fraud argument, Rove noted on Sunday, "has been rejected by over 50 courts" including a mix of judges appointed by former presidents Obama and Bush as well as some Trump appointees.

A Giuliani defense, he added, "raises the likelihood of more than 17 Republicans voting for conviction."

Power Up: Trump is increasingly isolated after being impeached again. But he's still got Alan Dershowitz

  Power Up: Trump is increasingly isolated after being impeached again. But he's still got Alan Dershowitz House Democrats have started working on their case against Trump for a Senate trial. Good Thursday morning. We want to note that tomorrow will mark our final Power Up edition featuring our pun-master Brent Griffiths before he heads over to a new gig. We're so thankful for all of his hustle and hard work covering the flash flooding of news over the past two years. Thanks for waking up with us.

Former Republican senator calls for witnesses in Senate trial . Ex- Giuliani associate gives more material to impeachment investigators. Brace yourself for the possibility that House The Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump resumes Thursday with up to another eight hours of

Trump could become the third president in American history to be impeached . It's not clear yet whether Democrats will levy that accusation against Trump in an article of impeachment . "The direction from Trump was clear -- work with Giuliani because he represents me in this matter," CNN

Giuliani also told ABC News that he's working on Trump's impeachment defense and that the president could not have incited the crowds because they did not immediately march on the Capitol after his speech at a rally.

"You'd have to have people running out, you'd have to have people running out of that frozen speech, right up to the Capitol. And that's basically, incitement," he said.

The former New York mayor spoke at the same rally and called for "trial by combat."

"I'm willing to stake my reputation, the president is willing to stake his reputation, on the fact that we're going to find criminality [in the election]," he said at the time.

Speaking to The Hill's Brett Samuels last week, Giuliani insisted the term was a reference to the HBO series "Game of Thrones" and not a literal invocation of violence.

What’s next for Trump’s Senate impeachment trial .
The House transmitted its article of impeachment to the Senate. Here’s what we know about the trial.That main action in that trial is still about two weeks away, set to start around February 9 (though we’ll be seeing documents — including Trump’s response to the charges — sooner.) Many details about how the trial will be structured and proceed remain unsettled, though it will likely be short. Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said Sunday it will “move relatively quickly” because the Senate has “so much else to do” — for instance, confirming President Joe Biden’s nominees, and trying to pass a coronavirus relief bill.

usr: 0
This is interesting!