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Politics Trump considered naming new AG to help push baseless claims of voter fraud

01:05  24 january  2021
01:05  24 january  2021 Source:   nbcnews.com

The Daily 202: Few House Republicans defended Trump’s conduct as they opposed his second impeachment

  The Daily 202: Few House Republicans defended Trump’s conduct as they opposed his second impeachment The vibe was different from December 2019 on both sides of the aisle. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) said President Trump “bears responsibility for Wednesday’s attack on Congress by mob rioters” and faulted him for not immediately denouncing the violence “when he saw what was unfolding.

WASHINGTON — Then-President Donald Trump considered replacing acting attorney general Jeffrey Rosen in January with Justice Department lawyer Jeffrey Clark, who was willing to help Trump push his claims of widespread voter fraud in order to overturn the election results

Trump reportedly asked about naming far-right conspiracy theorist Sidney Powell to investigate Multiple advisors, including some who have been sympathetic to the president's baseless claims The New York Times reported that Trump advisors forcefully pushed back on the idea of naming

WASHINGTON — Then-President Donald Trump considered replacing acting attorney general Jeffrey Rosen in January with Justice Department lawyer Jeffrey Clark, who was willing to help Trump push his claims of widespread voter fraud in order to overturn the election results, according to a Justice Department official.

Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie © Provided by NBC News

Trump ultimately decided against firing Rosen out of fear that it would lead to mass resignations from Justice Department staff, which he worried could undermine his goal of staying in power.

Trump's unsuccessful efforts to use the Justice Department to stay in office were first reported by The New York Times and confirmed by NBC News.

Post-ABC poll: Overwhelming opposition to Capitol attacks, majority support for preventing Trump from serving again

  Post-ABC poll: Overwhelming opposition to Capitol attacks, majority support for preventing Trump from serving again Majorities also discount election fraud claims, though most Republicans say the party should continue to follow Trump’s lead. Even as the findings are sharply partisan, over half of Americans — and 1 in 8 Republicans — say Trump should be criminally charged for his role in the attacks.

Trying to find another avenue to push his baseless election claims , Donald Trump considered installing a loyalist. Their informal pact ultimately helped persuade Mr. Trump to keep Mr. Rosen in place, calculating that a furor over mass resignations at the top of the Justice Department would

Trump declined to comment to the Times. One of his advisers told the paper that the former President had pushed for investigating "rampant election fraud that has plagued our system for years" and "any assertion to the contrary is false and being driven by those who wish to keep the system broken."

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer wrote on Twitter that the Justice Department inspector general "must launch an investigation into this attempted sedition now."

Trump and Clark had come up with a plan to get rid of Rosen, freeing them up to use the Justice Department's resources to pressure Georgia state lawmakers to overturn its presidential election results.

Trump became fixated on Georgia after the state was called for President Joe Biden by roughly 12,000 votes, making Trump the first Republican to lose the state in over 20 years. Georgia's election results alone would not have been enough Electoral College votes to make Trump the winner.

Clark denied that he had devised a plan with Trump, saying in a statement provided to The New York Times: "There was a candid discussion of options and pros and cons with the president. It is unfortunate that those who were part of a privileged legal conversation would comment in public about such internal deliberations, while also distorting any discussions."

'Not my president': How 2021 inauguration anger compares to 2017 resistance movement

  'Not my president': How 2021 inauguration anger compares to 2017 resistance movement Since November's election result broke the way of President-elect Joe Biden, Democrats and the media have urged Trump supporters to move on and accept defeat so the country can move on and the healing can begin. © Provided by Washington Examiner But four years ago, when President Trump first took office, many of those same people were themselves quick to reject the election results, prompting the start of four years of the resistance movement.

According to a new bombshell New York Times report, Trump was plotting an 11th-hour sacking of Rosen in the final weeks of his administration so he could install a conspiracy theory-friendly DOJ deputy who was willing to put the agency’s imprimatur on the president’s bid to delegitimize the vote .

The fraud claims are mostly a fundraising gambit. “Normally, a losing candidate’s supporters emerge from an election despondent and highly unlikely to immediately dip back into their bank accounts for another political contribution. But dubious claims from the president and his team that they were

Throughout his presidency, Trump sought to bend Justice Department officials to act in his favor. His actions became increasingly troubling after he lost his re-election, leading some of his most loyal allies, including former Attorney General Bill Barr, to break from him.

Trump announced on Twitter in December that Barr would be leaving his post shortly after the attorney general said publicly there was no widespread fraud in the election, defying Trump. Rosen took over for Barr in the final month of Trump's presidency.

When asked for comment, an advisor to Trump said : "President Trump has consistently argued that our justice system should be investigating the broader, rampant election fraud that has plagued our system for years. Any assertion to the contrary is false and being driven by those who wish to keep the system broken."

News of Trump's actions sparked immediate criticism.

"We saw the coup attempt attempt at the Capitol on Jan. 6th, little did we know that one had been attempted at the Department of Justice," said former Justice Department official David Laufman in an interview with MSNBC's Rachel Maddow on Friday.

The Senate impeachment trial for Trump is expected to begin the week of Feb. 8th. Trump is the first U.S. president to be impeached by the House twice.

How to rig an America .
From the presidency down, an imbalanced system is being tugged consistently in one direction. But as polling from Pew Research Center last summer showed, about 4 in 10 Trump supporters had no friends who supported Biden, and vice versa. That effect was more pronounced in places where Trump had won by wider margins in 2016. In counties he won by 30 or more points, 46 percent of Trump supporters said they had no Biden-supporting friends. In counties Trump lost by the same margin, only 30 percent of Trump supporters said they knew no one backing Biden.

usr: 0
This is interesting!