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Politics GOP Sen. Marco Rubio suggested Hillary Clinton could be impeached if Trump was convicted in impeachment trial

23:55  13 february  2021
23:55  13 february  2021 Source:   businessinsider.com

To Try a President

  To Try a President Should Richard Nixon have faced criminal prosecution? A never-before-published article from 1974, written by a leading legal scholar, offers answers that speak to the present.A law professor at the University of Chicago, my father was an expert in several fields—torts, taxation, empirical research on legal institutions—but his consuming passion was the First Amendment. After suffering a heart attack in 1969 at the age of 55, he reordered his priorities and began to work on a book he had conceived of early in his career but had long deferred: an intellectual history of the Supreme Court’s encounters with the First Amendment. “The book,” he told me, “I’ve always wanted to write.

Marco Rubio sitting at a table looking at a laptop: Rubio worked with several bipartisan leaders to secure $377 billion in funding to support small businesses during the pandemic. Getty pool © Getty pool Rubio worked with several bipartisan leaders to secure $377 billion in funding to support small businesses during the pandemic. Getty pool
  • Sen. Marco Rubio argued that if Hillary Clinton could be convicted in light of Trump's impeachment.
  • The Senate on Saturday voted to acquit Trump during his second impeachment trial.
  • Prior to the acquittal, Rubio said that if Trump were to be convicted, Clinton could be impeached in the future.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida argued on Friday that a conviction for former President Donald Trump during his second impeachment could mean there's nothing preventing the Senate from doing the same to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Opinion: The Senate should do everything it can to avoid a zombie impeachment trial

  Opinion: The Senate should do everything it can to avoid a zombie impeachment trial Tim Naftali writes that with almost 6 in 10 Americans saying they blame President Trump for the January 6 insurrection, is it really inevitable that this dark episode will lead to a zombie Senate trial that mindlessly sleepwalks to an acquittal? Many historians don't like the idea of inevitability, since it denies the important role of individuals and institutions in bucking perceived trends. In that spirit, I believe there are three potential outcomes, not all of which are mutually exclusive, that would be better than where we seemed to be headed now. The Senate trial could be short-circuited now without a verdict.

"Voting to convict the former president would create a new precedent that a former official can be convicted and disqualified by the Senate," Rubio said. "Therefore, is it not true that under this new precedent, a future House, facing partisan pressure to lock her up, could impeach a former Secretary of State and a future Senate be forced to put her on trial and potentially disqualify from any future office?"

Rep. Jamie Raskin, the impeachment manager tapped by the House to oversee the proceedings, said Trump was impeached a second time while he was still in office.

The "hypothetical [scenario raised] has no bearing on this case," Raskin said.

The House of Representatives voted to impeach Trump a second time in January, just days after the January 6 riot during which insurrectionists stormed the Capitol building. House members impeached him on an "incitement of insurrection" charge.

What Matters: America's future was at stake on the first day of the impeachment trial

  What Matters: America's future was at stake on the first day of the impeachment trial The second impeachment trial of President Donald J. Trump is underway. It is only the fourth impeachment trial in US history, and the first time a president has been tried after leaving office -- as well as for a second time. © Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images House impeachment managers, led by Congressman Jamie Raskin, Lead Manager, proceed through the Capitol Rotunda from the House side of the U.S. Capitol to the U.S. Senate chamber as the second impeachment trial of former U.S. President Donald Trump begins February 9, 2021 in Washington, DC.

Ten Republican House members were among those who voted to impeach Trump.

On Saturday, the Senate voted to acquit Trump. All 50 Democrats and 7 Republicans voted to convict Trump, while 43 Republicans voted to acquit.

During the four years of his presidential tenure and on the campaign trail in 2016, Trump used "lock her up" as a rallying cry against his former rival Clinton. His supporters have since applied this call to other women in power, including Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer.

Trump often blasted Clinton, referring to her as "crooked Hillary" in tweets and while addressing crowds.

Rubio was one of the fiercest opponents to the impeachment proceedings. In January, he called it "stupid" and promised to vote "the first chance I get" to "end this trial."

His office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Read the original article on Business Insider

When Will Donald Trump's Second Impeachment Trial Begin? .
Impeachment trial proceedings begin this week, more than a month after the Capitol riots that triggered the former president's second impeachment in the House.Senators will convene on Capitol Hill at 1 p.m. ET to begin the trial. C-SPAN will livestream the trial, and many major television networks are also expected to cover the proceedings.

usr: 1
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