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Politics Appearance of military vehicles in Myanmar's major cities sparks warning from US embassy

22:51  14 february  2021
22:51  14 february  2021 Source:   thehill.com

Japan's Kirin ditches Myanmar beer partner because of its ties to the military

  Japan's Kirin ditches Myanmar beer partner because of its ties to the military Japanese companies bet on Myanmar years ago as the Southeast Asian country emerged from decades of military rule. But this week's coup has already ended one of those deals. © Yichuan Cao/Sipa USA Kirin Brewery Company's Kirin Light and Kirin Ichiban beer can be seen at a store in Cupertino, California, United States on Thursday, November 21, 2019. The Japanese conglomerate Kirin Holdings has acquired Colorado-based New Belgium Brewing.

The U.S. embassy in Myanmar on Sunday warned American citizens in that country to "shelter in place" as armored vehicles began rolling through major cities.

a truck on a city street: A military vehicle rolls down a street in Myanmar. © Getty Images A military vehicle rolls down a street in Myanmar.

Reuters reported armored vehicles appeared in the cities of Yangon, Myitkyina and Sittwe. The news service noted this is the first large-scale rollout of such vehicles to occur in the country since the military on Feb. 1 overthrew the democratically elected government.

Security forces were also deployed by Myanmar's military junta and sent to power plants on Sunday, Reuters reported, causing a confrontation with demonstrators who feared the government would cut off electricity. Shots were fired at the demonstrators to disperse them, according to Reuters, though it is currently unclear whether the bullets were rubber or live fire.

Myanmar's internet shut down as protestors flooded the streets. The military coup leaders sought to shut down Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter earlier this week.

  Myanmar's internet shut down as protestors flooded the streets. The military coup leaders sought to shut down Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter earlier this week. Leaders of the military coup in Myanmar shut down the country's internet, after asking providers to block Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. The shutdown would "severely limit coverage of anti-coup protests," said NetBlocks. Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. As protestors on Saturday flooded Myanmar's streets, calling for an end to the military coup, the country's internet access was almost entirely shut down. "The regime has cut off all internet lines amid ongoing protests against the #militarycoup," wrote Myanmar Now, an independent local news agency, on Twitter.

Two journalists from The 74 Media were arrested, the outlet said in a Facebook post. The reporters had been broadcasting live from the scene of the confrontation.


Gallery: Photos of the Day (Reuters)

a view of a city street at night: Flames rise from the municipality building that was set on fire during protests against the lockdown and worsening economic conditions, in Tripoli, Lebanon, January 28. Clashes continue between security forces and protesters angry over a strict lockdown that has cut off livelihoods in a collapsing economy. REUTERS/Walid Saleh

Government workers have also staged a strike in response to the coup, Reuters reported, with the junta ordering them to return to work with the threat of action if they do not. Myanmar-based analyst Richard Horsey told Reuters that the strikes by civil servants have caused many government departments to cease functioning.

"This has the potential to also affect vital functions - the military can replace engineers and doctors, but not power grid controllers and central bankers," Horsey said.

In addition to warning people to shelter in place, the U.S. embassy also cautioned there was a "possibility of telecommunications interruptions overnight between 1:00 a.m. and 9:00 a.m," Reuters reports.

Around a dozen embassies for Western countries such as the U.K. and Canada called on the Burmese security forces to "refrain from violence against demonstrators and civilians, who are protesting the overthrow of their legitimate government."

President Biden last week announced sanctions against military commanders in Myanmar in response to the coup. The U.S. will also redirect $42.4 million of U.S. assistance away from the country's government and instead funnel it to civil society and private sector projects.

Facebook removed the main page of Myanmar military as protests continue following a military coup .
The military, known as the Tatmadaw, staged a coup on February 1, detaining officials over debunked claims of voter fraud during their election.Insider has reached out to Facebook for comment, but a spokesperson told Reuters: "In line with our global policies, we've removed the Tatmadaw True News Information Team Page from Facebook for repeated violations of our Community Standards prohibiting incitement of violence and coordinating harm.

usr: 1
This is interesting!