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Politics Garland calls Capitol riot 'heinous attack' in opening statement to Senate Judiciary Committee

05:50  21 february  2021
05:50  21 february  2021 Source:   cnn.com

LIVE COVERAGE: Democrats focus on Trump remarks before attack on Capitol

  LIVE COVERAGE: Democrats focus on Trump remarks before attack on Capitol The Senate kicks off day two of the second impeachment trial of former President Trump on Wednesday.While the first day focused on the constitutional question of whether the Senate could hold a trial for a former president, the actual oral arguments begin today.The historic trial centers on whether Trump incited a mob that attacked the Capitol on Jan. 6, sending lawmakers fleeing for safety and temporarily halting Congress's certification ofWhile the first day focused on the constitutional question of whether the Senate could hold a trial for a former president, the actual oral arguments begin today.

Judge Merrick Garland, President Joe Biden's nominee for attorney general, calls the January 6 attack on the US Capitol a "heinous attack" in his prepared opening statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee, which the Department of Justice released Saturday night ahead of his confirmation hearing on Monday.

Merrick Garland wearing a suit and tie: WILMINGTON, DELAWARE - JANUARY 07: Federal Judge Merrick Garland delivers remarks after being nominated to be U.S. attorney general by President-elect Joe Biden at The Queen theater January 07, 2021 in Wilmington, Delaware. Garland, who serves as a judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, was nominated to the Supreme Court by President Barack Obama in 2016 but Senate Republicans refused him a hearing or confirmation vote. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) © Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images WILMINGTON, DELAWARE - JANUARY 07: Federal Judge Merrick Garland delivers remarks after being nominated to be U.S. attorney general by President-elect Joe Biden at The Queen theater January 07, 2021 in Wilmington, Delaware. Garland, who serves as a judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, was nominated to the Supreme Court by President Barack Obama in 2016 but Senate Republicans refused him a hearing or confirmation vote. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

"If confirmed, I will supervise the prosecution of white supremacists and others who stormed the Capitol on January 6 -- a heinous attack that sought to disrupt a cornerstone of our democracy: the peaceful transfer of power to a newly elected government," Garland says in the statement.

The Backstory: What we've learned about the Capitol rioters — and why we'll continue to dig

  The Backstory: What we've learned about the Capitol rioters — and why we'll continue to dig We've been tracking those who stormed the Capitol. Here's what we know about the 'toxic brew of conspiracy theorists' who met up that deadly day.Twenty-four Texans have been arrested for their roles in the Capitol riot, the most of any state. Nationwide, the list of arrested includes 180 men and 26 women, from 18 to 70 years old.

The attorney general nominee plans to stress that the role is meant to "serve the Rule of Law and to ensure equal justice under the law." Additionally, he will explain why he is leaving a lifetime position as a federal judge.

"...(M)any of you have asked why I would agree to leave a lifetime appointment as a judge," Garland says in the statement. "I have told you that I love being a judge. I have also told you that this is an important time for me to step forward because of my deep respect for the Department of Justice and its critical role in ensuring the Rule of Law."

Barring any surprises at his hearing, he's poised to become Biden's first attorney general, bringing a longtime jurist with a steadying hand to a department that's teetering between crises. Garland has served in the Justice Department as an assistant US Attorney in Washington, DC, and if confirmed by the Senate will step away from 24 years on the bench.

This is a breaking story and will be updated.

Top officials testify they never saw FBI warning of possible Jan. 6 “war” against Congress .
Security officials who resigned in the wake of the Capitol riot blamed intelligence failures — and each other Former US Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund appears before a Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs & Senate Rules and Administration joint hearing on Capitol Hill, Washington, DC, February 23, 2021, to examine the January 6th attack on the Capitol.

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This is interesting!