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Politics FAA orders stepped up inspections on some Boeing 777s after engine failure incident

03:41  22 february  2021
03:41  22 february  2021 Source:   thehill.com

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The announcement came shortly after the aviation authority in Japan ordered airlines there to stop flying the plane. Both the Japanese and American orders apply to Boeing 777 s equipped with Pratt & Whitney PW4000 engines . “We reviewed all available safety data following yesterday’s incident “Based on the initial information, we concluded that the inspection interval should be stepped up for the hollow fan blades that are unique to this model of engine , used solely on Boeing 777 airplanes.” Mr. Dickson said the F.A.A. was working with its counterparts around the world and said that its safety

FAA Administrator Steve Dickson said in a statement late Sunday that officials ordered the inspections after examining the hollow fan blade that failed , triggering the failure Saturday; the directive covers Boeing 777 airplanes equipped with certain Pratt & Whitney PW4000 engines and Meanwhile, Japan’s Civil Aviation Bureau ordered operators of the Boeing 777 involved in Saturday’s incident to halt operations, according to the FAA . This means that ANA Holdings and Japan Airlines will ground Boeing 777 planes they operate indefinitely. ANA operates 19 planes and JAL 13 with

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said Sunday it will be stepping up inspections of Boeing 777s that contain the same engine model that failed over Denver this weekend, with some likely to be removed from service.

a sign on the side of a building: FAA orders stepped up inspections on some Boeing 777s after engine failure incident © Getty Images FAA orders stepped up inspections on some Boeing 777s after engine failure incident

"After consulting with my team of aviation safety experts about yesterday's engine failure aboard a Boeing 777 airplane in Denver, I have directed them to issue an Emergency Airworthiness Directive that would require immediate or stepped-up inspections of Boeing 777 airplanes equipped with certain Pratt & Whitney PW4000 engines," Steve Dickson, FAA Administrator said in a statement posted on Twitter.

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The FAA says it will order inspections of some Boeing 777 jetliners after an engine failure on a United flight. United Flight 328 made an emergency landing back at Denver International Airport shortly after takeoff. No one was injured on board but debris, including what appeared to be the large engine covering was found in front of a house nearby. "We reviewed all available safety data following yesterday's incident . Based on the initial information, we concluded that the inspection interval should be stepped up for the hollow fan blades that are unique to this model of engine , used solely on

The order covers Boeing 777 airplanes equipped with certain Pratt & Whitney PW4000 engines and “will likely mean that some airplanes will be removed from service,” FAA administrator Steve Dickson said in a statement. The order came after a United Airlines passenger jet powered by two Pratt There were also no reports of injuries in suburban Broomfield, where huge chunks of engine and debris landed in yards, parks and on vehicles. An initial review of the incident showed that “ inspection interval should be stepped up for the hollow fan blades that are unique to this model of engine used

"We reviewed all available safety data following yesterday's incident," he added.

Dickson was referring to an engine malfunction that occurred on a Boeing 777 shortly after it took off from the airport in Denver. The engine dropped metal debris into a Denver neighborhood, but the flight was able to land safely and no injuries related to the engine failure have been reported.

"Based on the initial information, we concluded that the inspection interval should be stepped up for the hollow fan blades that are unique to this model of engine, used solely on Boeing 777 airplanes," Dickson added. "The FAA is working closely with other civil aviation authorities to make this information available to affected operators in their jurisdictions."

FAA orders 'stepped-up' inspections of Boeing 777 aircraft after engine failure on United flight

  FAA orders 'stepped-up' inspections of Boeing 777 aircraft after engine failure on United flight Federal regulators said the inspections apply to aircraft with certain Pratt & Whitney engines.The inspections would apply to 777s equipped with Pratt & Whitney model PW4000 engines, said Steve Dickson, the Federal Aviation Administration administrator.

The US Federal Aviation Administration ( FAA ) said on Sunday the directive required immediate or stepped - up inspections of planes similar to the one involved in the Denver incident . The FAA administrator Steve Dickson said in a statement that the directive covered Boeing 777 airplanes equipped with certain Pratt & Whitney PW4000 engines and it “will likely mean that some airplanes will be removed from service”. Dickson said the initial review of Saturday’s engine failure shows “ inspection interval should be stepped up for the hollow fan blades that are unique to this model of

United Airlines has ‘voluntarily’ grounded its fleet of 24 Boeing 777 airliners with Pratt & Whitney 4000 engines , after the Federal Aviation Administration issued an emergency airworthiness directive for the model.

After Dickson's announcement, CNN reported that United Airlines said it would be removing 24 Boeing 777 airplanes from its fleet that use the Pratt & Whitney PW4000 "immediately."

Delta's CEO said last year that the airline would be retiring Boeing 777 airplanes from its fleet amid ongoing financial difficulties due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The 777's will be replaced by Airbus 330s and 350-900s, which are more fuel and cost efficient.

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