•   
  •   
  •   

Politics 10 Things in Politics: Biden's big business romance

14:03  26 february  2021
14:03  26 february  2021 Source:   businessinsider.com

Biden heads out of D.C. for town hall and first major presidential trip

  Biden heads out of D.C. for town hall and first major presidential trip President Biden took his message to Milwaukee, attempting to move past former president Donald Trump’s impeachment and sell his own agenda. But even as he tries a return to normalcy, Biden’s events are heavily restricted by the pandemic. Speaking at a CNN town hall, Biden pledged that any American who wants a vaccine will have access to one by the end of July. He said he wanted many elementary and middle schools to be open five days a week by the end of April. And he said that "by next Christmas, I think we'll be in a very different circumstance.

Good morning! Welcome back to 10 Things in Politics. I'm Brent Griffiths. Sign up here to get this newsletter in your inbox each day.

a group of people sitting around a living room: President Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris, and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen meet with business leaders, including JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon (right) earlier this month. Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images © Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images President Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris, and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen meet with business leaders, including JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon (right) earlier this month. Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

Send your tips and thoughts to bgriffiths@insider.com or tweet me @BrentGriffiths.

Here's what you need to know:

  • Big business, usually friendlier with conservatives, is cozying up to Biden and Democrats.
  • Democrats suffered a major loss in their efforts to increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour.
  • The House voted to legal protections for LGBTQ Americans.

1. CORPORATE AMERICA AND DEMS' COMPLICATED STATUS: Big business' typical suitors are out of power, and its relationship with the Democrats is complicated. The two sides agree on some issues, like infrastructure investment and immigration reform. But splits are still apparent on raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour, higher corporate taxes, and stricter environmental regulations.

Live updates: Biden to host labor leaders in Oval Office to discuss coronavirus relief, infrastructure

  Live updates: Biden to host labor leaders in Oval Office to discuss coronavirus relief, infrastructure As part of his focus on the pandemic this week, the president plans to visit a Pfizer coronavirus vaccine manufacturing site in Michigan on Thursday. The meeting comes amid a stepped-up focus on the pandemic. Speaking at a nationally televised town hall on Tuesday, Biden pledged that any American who wants a vaccine will have access to one by the end of July and said he wants many elementary and middle schools to be open five days a week by the end of April.

  • Some businesses are glad to see Trump gone: "Our companies have been very concerned about former President Trump's rise in protectionism and chaotic governing," said Nancy McLernon, president and CEO of the Global Business Alliance, which represents the domestic interests of 200 multinationals including BP, Honda, and Sony.

Our exclusive report looks at where Dems and Corporate America stand on five key areas.

Campaign cash carries the day: Biden accepted most of the up to $1 million in donations corporations could put toward his inauguration. A newly-formed dark-money group in support of Biden's agenda, which may or may not disclose its donors, will offer another avenue for business influence.

But Republicans say the fight isn't over: "Let's be clear: Republicans, not Democrats, cut taxes and burdensome regulations that held American businesses back for decades," said Rep. Nancy Mace, a Republican from South Carolina who previously ran a consulting business.

Joe Biden's CNN Town Hall Transcript in Full—President on Trump, Vaccines and More

  Joe Biden's CNN Town Hall Transcript in Full—President on Trump, Vaccines and More President Biden spoke about everything from the end of the pandemic to being "tired of talking about Donald Trump," while answering questions from members of the audience.Biden discussed a range of topics, from when every American will be able to receive the COVID-19 vaccine and the end of the pandemic, to being "tired of talking about Donald Trump" while answering questions from Cooper and members of the audience.

Read the full report.

2. Democrats' "Fight for $15" just got a lot more complicated: The Senate Parliamentarian, an unelected, nonpartisan rules referee, handed down a long-expected ruling saying Democrats cannot include a $15 minimum wage increase as written in the massive $1.9 trillion relief package. (More on who that parliamentarian is here.)

  • What this means: The White House has said it would not overrule the parliamentarian, so Democrats will have to be creative if they want to pass an increase that doesn't deprive the relief package of its fast-track status that will allow it to pass without any Republican support.
  • What's next: Sen. Bernie Sanders said he's working on an amendment that would remove tax deductions "from large, profitable corporations" that don't pay their workers at least $15 per hour and provide incentives to small businesses to raise their wages. The House will still vote on the relief package later today. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the $15 minimum wage increase will stay in for now.

3. Biden ordered airstrikes against "Iranian-backed militant groups" in Syria: The strikes come after militants last week fired rockets that hit an Iraqi airbase used by the US military. That attack killed a US military contractor and wounded others. The strikes, according to defense officials, were primarily aimed at the militants' "infrastructure," not necessarily their personnel.

Jill Biden is hitting the ground running -- in all directions

  Jill Biden is hitting the ground running -- in all directions As far as Jill Biden is concerned, there isn't necessarily going to be one "first lady platform," or even two or three. A month into the job, and Biden has heaped a lot on her agenda, unsure at the moment exactly how it will unfold, only that it will "naturally evolve," she has told her staff.Unlike her predecessor Melania Trump, Biden has packed a calendar-full of events, appearances (most virtual) and interviews, aggressively pursuing policy passion projects, and maintaining her schedule as a teacher at a northern Virginia community college.

Read more on the operation and what it means as Biden tries to restart nuclear talks with Iran.

a person wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: Democratic Rep. David Cicilline speaks to reporters about the passage of the Equality Act. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Rep. Jerry Nadler look on. Jacquelyn Martin/AP © Jacquelyn Martin/AP Democratic Rep. David Cicilline speaks to reporters about the passage of the Equality Act. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Rep. Jerry Nadler look on. Jacquelyn Martin/AP

4. The House voted to expand legal protections for LGBTQ Americans: "The Equality Act amends existing civil rights law to explicitly include sexual orientation and gender identification as protected characteristics," the Associated Press reports. "The protections would extend to employment, housing, loan applications, education, public accommodations, and other areas."

Just three Republicans joined Democrats in passing the bill. The White House has said the act is a top priority, but it faces a difficult path in the Senate.

5. Right-wing extremists "want to blow up the Capitol," police chief tells lawmakers: They want to attack when Biden gives his first address to a joint session of Congress, Yogananda Pittman testified. The Capitol Police now want to keep their enhanced security, which has included National Guard troops and a fence around the area. More details here.

Centrists flex political muscle in critical week for Biden agenda: The Note

  Centrists flex political muscle in critical week for Biden agenda: The Note The Democrats' divide is making itself evident in a week that is posing the most significant hurdles Biden has yet faced in terms of personnel and policy on Capitol Hill. The opposition of a single moderate Democrat has the White House shopping for Republican support -- so far in vain -- for the president's choice to lead the Office of Management and Budget. There's even more public skepticism among some Democrats over a $15-an-hour minimum wage, which could fall victim to either complicated Senate procedure or simple congressional math in the coming days.

6. Washington moves of the week: Former Trump staffers are finding new jobs in Washington. Top party committees are also gearing up for the midterms.

Erin Perrine joined Republican Sen. Ted Cruz's office. She previously worked on Trump's 2020 campaign. Mindy Myers, Tracey Lewis, and Sarah Callahan Zusi launched MZL Media, a Democratic consulting firm. Roger Lau, a Warren 2020 veteran, was named deputy executive director for the DNC.

As for federal agencies, Richard Sauber is now general counsel for the Department of Veterans Affairs; Mickeala Carter, a former Democratic Hill staffer, is the USDA's new deputy director of communications. And, finally, Susan Fox will become Disney's top lobbyist in Washington.

Read our complete, exclusive list of DC hirings.

  • Want to see your name here too?: We've put together tips on how to work on the Hill, get a gig working in Washington at large, or land in the Biden administration. And don't forget to share your news with us!
  • Looking for something different?: The Peace Corps' program is on pause, but they want to send volunteers back out as soon as it's safe. We have some exclusive advice on how you can get ready.

7. The top things for your calendar, all times Eastern:

  • 11:00 a.m.: The White House's pandemic team holds a news briefing.
  • 12:55 p.m.: Biden tours the Harris County Emergency Operations Center during a trip to Texas with the first lady.
  • The House will vote on the $1.9 trillion relief plan.

8. A Manhattan prosecutor has Trump's taxes: The former president's long court fight ended with his turning over past tax returns to the Manhattan district attorney, shortly after the Supreme Court rejected a last-ditch effort.

GOP congresswoman's husband, whose truck had Three Percenters decal, says he never heard of armed group before

  GOP congresswoman's husband, whose truck had Three Percenters decal, says he never heard of armed group before Illinois state Rep. Chris Miller said he was given the sticker featuring the armed group's logo by a friend "who said that it represented patriotism."Illinois state Rep. Chris Miller’s truck was seen with a large Three Percenter decal, which the FBI has labeled a "radical militia group," while on Capitol grounds the day of the attack. But Miller denied promoting the group and told the Daily Beast that he "never was a member" and didn’t know about the Three Percenters until "fake news started this fake story and read about them.

Read our explainer on the "potential treasure trove" of information on Trump's financial dealings.

9. Wall Street had its worst sell-off since October: Tech stocks led the plunge as the 10-year Treasury yield spiked to its highest point in a year. The Dow closed down 1.76% (526 points), while the tech-heavy Nasdaq slid 3.52%. Experts say it's all about the bond market.

10. Sheer joy: Baarack was having a rough time before he was rescued. The domestic sheep was found in an Australian forest weighed down by 78 pounds of overgrown wool. He could barely see before, but he can "now see the world more clearly."

a sheep standing in a room: Baarack the sheep before his thick wool was shorn. Edgar's Mission Inc/Handout via REUTERS © Edgar's Mission Inc/Handout via REUTERS Baarack the sheep before his thick wool was shorn. Edgar's Mission Inc/Handout via REUTERS

One last thing.

Today's trivia question: In 1844, who sent the first telegraph from the original Supreme Court chambers in the US Capitol? Email your guess and a suggested question for Monday to me at bgriffiths@insider.com.

  • Yesterday's answer: The reverse of the $5 shows the Lincoln Memorial, which was dedicated in 1922. There were 48 states at the time, but only the front side of the memorial is shown. So, the answer was 26 states.

That's all for now! See you Monday.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Biden’s Quiet Style Belies Ambitions Beyond Undoing Trump Legacy .
(Bloomberg) -- The new U.S. president starts his days with an early morning workout in the gym of the White House residence, watching MSNBC or CNN, and ends them at a reasonable hour often with a bowl of Breyers chocolate chip ice cream. He doesn’t read Twitter unless someone shows him a tweet, and the posts at his own accounts are written by other people and almost never make news. He pores through briefing books, his aides say, beginning about 7:30 a.m. on weekdays, and receives an intelligence briefing most every day. He requires masks in the White House.

usr: 0
This is interesting!