•   
  •   
  •   

Politics Once omnipresent Kushner now MIA from Trump's political pack

16:12  04 march  2021
16:12  04 march  2021 Source:   cnn.com

Trump Thinks He’s Found a New Defense

  Trump Thinks He’s Found a New Defense In his response to an adverse decision by the Supreme Court, the former president previewed an argument he’s likely to keep using.Trump had already lost a bid to prevent Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance Jr. from acquiring his financial records via subpoena. The former president then sought a stay while he searched for other means to stall. As anticipated, the justices rejected the request. Trump then issued one of just a handful of public statements he’s issued since leaving office, blasting “the Continuing Political Persecution of President Donald J. Trump.

As Donald Trump plotted his Conservative Political Action Conference appearance last week, and a broader, more-robust plan to return to politics as an omnipresent disruptor, one person was conspicuously absent from the confab.

a man wearing a suit and tie © Win McNamee/Getty Images

Jared Kushner, Trump's son-in-law, was notably not on the list of advisers assisting the former President. Kushner, who previously served as chief adviser-cum-micromanager with far-reaching responsibilities and had virtual carte blanche, has tapped out, say several people who worked closely with Kushner at the White House or are familiar with his thinking and told CNN on background in order to maintain relationships.

Trump's “sabotage” plan: Watchdog groups want to know who was “burrowed” into career jobs

  Trump's “sabotage” plan: Watchdog groups want to know who was “burrowed” into career jobs Members of Trump’s Cabinet urged staffers to “be the resistance” against the incoming Biden administration Donald Trump and Joe Biden JIM WATSON,SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

"Right now, he's just checked out of politics," says one person, echoing the mindset of Kushner's wife, Ivanka Trump, who is so over the political bubble she has told friends and colleagues of late to not utter anything to do with Washington.

Given Trump's election loss and current out-of-power position, Kushner's absence from the aftermath follows a pattern critics have previously pointed out: being present for the wins and MIA from the losses. A person with close ties to Kushner told CNN that Trump's son-in-law is enjoying "some much needed time with his family," and his retreat is unrelated to the ebb and flow of the former President's popularity.

During the administration, Kushner was more than happy to speak on behalf of the moments that turned out well for the White House -- but also conveniently skip the parts embroiled in turmoil.

Jared Kushner proved the only useful Trump in government

  Jared Kushner proved the only useful Trump in government Donald Trump's ascendancy was a rebuke of American dynasties, as he buried Jeb Bush in the 2016 primary and then defeated Hillary Clinton in the general election. But the former president seems keen to make his family a new one. © Provided by Washington Examiner Despite never previously lived in Florida, Ivanka Trump was briefly touted as a potential primary competitor for Marco Rubio's Senate seat. Lara Trump, whose pre-2016 professional experience consisted of producing a tabloid TV show, is seriously considering running for a North Carolina Senate seat in 2022. And evidently, Trump's inner circle endorses this.

As far back as 2017, when Trump's health care plan floundered and failed, Kushner and his family were on the slopes of Aspen, Colorado. In 2018, they were vacationing in Florida amid the government shutdown, even though the White House insisted Kushner was actively leading negotiations. And in 2019, when Trump was under fire for multiple issues, from background checks to comments about Jews and Democrats, the couple was having downtime in Wyoming, something even Trump noted with a tweet of a photo of them on vacation: "Two incredible people. I can't believe they're not working (few work harder)!"

A Trump spokeswoman did not provide an on the record response to CNN's request for comment.

It's not clear, however, who is instigating this -- at least for now -- breakup. Some who have been in contact with Kushner place it at the feet of being done with his father-in-law's antics. Sources closer to Trump say he's angry with his son-in-law over the election loss.

Fact checking Trump's CPAC speech

  Fact checking Trump's CPAC speech Former President Donald Trump returned to the public stage on Sunday with a familiar kind of Trump speech -- a speech filled with debunked lies. © Joe Raedle/Getty Images ORLANDO, FLORIDA - FEBRUARY 28: Former President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. Begun in 1974, CPAC brings together conservative organizations, activists, and world leaders to discuss issues important to them.

Trump's regulars, minus one

That Kushner has now developed anathema to his father-in-law's political appetite is questionable in its timing, an indicator that Kushner again is putting space between his image and Trump's, in the wake of the delusional flow of falsehoods after Election Day and the deadly Trump-incited insurrection at the US Capitol on January 6.

Yet several people told CNN that Kushner is truly -- this time -- effectively done with Trump's rhetoric.

Kushner and Ivanka Trump got out of their posh Washington rental home soon after January 20, the last moving trucks rolling towards their new high-rise, beachside Miami rental departing within 24 hours of President Joe Biden's inauguration. Another person familiar with Kushner's new chapter, says he wants closure and a fresh start, one that doesn't include advising his father-in-law on a daily basis.

Yet two other people who spoke with CNN indicated the schism was instigated by Trump, who has been telling those in his inner circle he is angry with Kushner.

Late last week, when Trump convened what he believes is his strongest political brain trust for a meeting to discuss his political future he did not include Kushner. The group looked at the 2022 midterms and, more and more likely, say people who have spoken to Trump of late, a presidential run in 2024.

Trump is facing probes from 5 independently elected investigators

  Trump is facing probes from 5 independently elected investigators Five independently elected investigators have turned their attention to former President Donald Trump, a sign his legal woes are mounting as he no longer enjoys the protections once afforded to him by the Oval Office. © Joe Raedle/Getty Images ORLANDO, FLORIDA - FEBRUARY 28: Former U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. Begun in 1974, CPAC brings together conservative organizations, activists, and world leaders to discuss issues important to them.

Ensconced in Trump's private quarters at Mar-a-Lago, his club/post-White House headquarters/home in Palm Beach, the advisers consisted in part of former campaign manager Bill Stepien, adviser Jason Miller, former White House social media director Dan Scavino, Trump's son Donald Trump Jr. and another former campaign manager, Brad Parscale, who Kushner fired at Trump's request last summer and replaced with Stepien.

On the table was a push to create a super PAC to raise money, as well as a broader discussion of who would do what as Trump determined where and when and to whom to dole his outsized influence within a fractured Republican Party.

For Kushner not to be present at a strategic roundtable struck many who know his deep involvement in every aspect of Trump's political messaging as odd.

"That's about as 180 a turn as he could ever make," said a third person, who worked inside the Trump White House with Kushner. "This was a guy who for four years did everything on behalf of President Trump. He lived that job."

Another former White House colleague expressed surprise at Kushner's decision to walk away, adding there was nothing in the administration's portfolio that Kushner didn't "meddle" in, according to this person.

From domestic policy, foreign policy, staffing, speechwriting, national security, criminal justice reform, budget, Covid-19, Kushner had a hand in it all.

Republicans have built a cult of personality around Trump that glosses over his disgraced presidency

  Republicans have built a cult of personality around Trump that glosses over his disgraced presidency As leading Republicans whitewash Trump's legacy and enable the personality cult surrounding him, it's also revealing deep fractures in the party. In a mid-February statement explaining why he was voting to convict Trump over the Capitol riot in the former president's Senate impeachment trial, GOP Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska warned about the dangers of "tribalism." Sasse was effectively calling out his Republican colleagues who were standing by Trump despite the damning, indisputable evidence against him on top of his relentless attacks on the foundations of America's democracy.

"He was an 'expert' in everything," said the former colleague, who noted Kushner's flitting from one topic to the next was often the bane of some senior West Wing staff's existence.

Distanced relationship

But Kushner's -- and similarly Ivanka Trump's -- ability to maneuver in and out of topics, day-in and day-out, was due in part to being family.

"It's not like Trump could fire his son-in-law, or give him a nickname and attack him on Twitter," said the person who worked inside the Trump White House.

As such, Kushner was able to be a chief strategist and an influential voice for the then-President.

Not so much now.

Two of the people who spoke to CNN say Kushner's relationship with Trump, son-in-law or no, has been fractured since Trump's reelection loss.

Trump, they say, has at times in the last several weeks expressed to those close to him that he faults Kushner for losing.

A person who speaks with Kushner frequently strongly denied any contention between the two men, noting Kushner and Trump met for lunch Wednesday in Florida at Trump's Doral property.

Kushner, however, would be a plausible surrogate, seeing it was he who orchestrated much of the administration's response to, essentially, most things, from the economy to immigration reform and ultimately coronavirus -- and who can forget Kushner's pledge last April during an interview that the United States would be "really rocking again" by July?

"We know the boss isn't going to blame himself" (for losing the election), said one source speaking to the nature of their relationship, highlighting Trump's habitual avoidance of personal responsibility.

However, if it is Trump who is keeping Kushner at arm's length, or vice versa, one thing is clear to those who have talked to Kushner in recent weeks: "He wants a break," said a person familiar with his thinking. But the source predicted that after a cooling-off period, and if and when Trump decides to launch a 2024 campaign, Kushner would likely come back into the fold as an adviser.

For now, however, Kushner is more than willing to see Trump Jr. or even Parscale assume the role of Trump whisperer and loyal first lieutenant, though Kushner's close associate said he keeps tabs on Stepien, Parscale and Miller, and speaks with them frequently.

Several of the people who spoke to CNN noted Kushner's peripheral interests still include an ongoing focus on the Middle East, brokering peace deals and helping ensure they take hold.

He would also like to be part of advancing criminal justice reform, such as reviving parole in the federal prison system, something that was eliminated in 1984 and Kushner feels deserves reexamination.

"He is trying to be someone you would go to on the Republican side to put a deal together," said the person familiar with Kushner's potential career path.

Yet for the foreseeable future, don't expect to spot Kushner among the former presidential advisers eagerly volunteering for a second tour.

"The drama of politics wore him down. Eventually, Trump wears everyone down," the person said.

‘Allen v. Farrow’ Team on Doc’s “Eye-Opening” Revisiting of Woody Allen, Mia Farrow Custody Case and Investigations .
“There are facts and details and documents and people who are corroborating what [they] have said for years, and no one listened,” Amy Herdy, the investigative producer on the HBO docuersies, tells The Hollywood Reporter of Mia and Dylan Farrow being “gaslit” by Allen.“Mia did not want to speak,” filmmaker Amy Ziering, who narrates some of the third episode, told The Hollywood Reporter. The credit goes to Amy Herdy, the lead investigative producer at co-directors Ziering and Kirby Dick’s Jane Doe Films, for repeatedly asking and gaining Farrow’s trust. “[Mia] obviously has been through a tremendous amount, through no wrongdoing of her own, that none of us would ever wish for anyone.

usr: 0
This is interesting!