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Politics Democratic Rep. Zoe Lofgren quietly releases massive social media report on GOP colleagues who voted to overturn the election

15:21  05 march  2021
15:21  05 march  2021 Source:   cnn.com

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  Connolly to GOP: I won't be lectured by those who voted to overturn the election Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) during a House panel on Wednesday pushed back against GOP lawmakers' claims of partisanship in calls to remove Trump-appointed Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, with the Virginia congressman saying he would "not be lectured by people," who voted to overturn the 2020 presidential election. The exchange came during DeJoy's hearing before the House Oversight and Reform Committee over his cost-cutting measures implemented in the months leading up to the November election. Connolly was among the 80 Democratic lawmakers who earlier this month called on President Biden to fill three vacancies on the U.S.

Democratic Rep. Zoe Lofgren has quietly posted a nearly 2,000-page report documenting social media posts by her Republican colleagues who voted against certifying results of the presidential election on January 6. The information compiled isn't secret, but the report is another sign of the deep distrust that has settled into the US Capitol in the weeks since the insurrection.

  Democratic Rep. Zoe Lofgren quietly releases massive social media report on GOP colleagues who voted to overturn the election © Senate TV

The report chronicles the social media activity of members on public forums immediately before the November election and right after the January 6 riot. The report has been online for a week.

CNN reported earlier Thursday that federal investigators are examining records of communications between members of Congress and the pro-Trump mob that attacked the Capitol, as the investigation moves closer to exploring whether lawmakers wittingly or unwittingly helped the insurrectionists.

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In a preamble to the report, Lofgren -- the chair of the House Administration Committee -- wrote that she had asked her staff to pull the relevant social media posts and compile them in an effort to gather facts.

"Any appropriate disciplinary action is a matter not only of the Constitution and law, but also of fact," the California Democrat wrote. "Many of former President Trump's false statements were made in very public settings. Had Members made similar public statements in the weeks and months before the January 6th attack? Statements which are readily available in the public arena may be part of any consideration of Congress' constitutional prerogatives and responsibilities."

Lofgren continued, "Accordingly, I asked my staff to take a quick look at public social media posts of Members who voted to overturn the 2020 presidential election."

Republicans have built a cult of personality around Trump that glosses over his disgraced presidency

  Republicans have built a cult of personality around Trump that glosses over his disgraced presidency As leading Republicans whitewash Trump's legacy and enable the personality cult surrounding him, it's also revealing deep fractures in the party. In a mid-February statement explaining why he was voting to convict Trump over the Capitol riot in the former president's Senate impeachment trial, GOP Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska warned about the dangers of "tribalism." Sasse was effectively calling out his Republican colleagues who were standing by Trump despite the damning, indisputable evidence against him on top of his relentless attacks on the foundations of America's democracy.

Tensions have risen within the Capitol since the January attack. A House floor that once was deemed impenetrable has been surrounded by metal detectors, while Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, a California Democrat, has said that "the enemy is within" the House, referencing the rhetoric and behavior of some Republican members of Congress.

"Like former President Trump, any elected Member of Congress who aided and abetted the insurrection or incited the attack seriously threatened our democratic government. They would have betrayed their oath of office and would be implicated in the same constitutional provision cited in the Article of Impeachment," Lofgren wrote in her foreword to the report. "That provision prohibits any person who has previously taken an oath as a member of Congress to support the Constitution but subsequently engaged in insurrection or rebellion from serving in Congress."

Taking names: Dem Rep. Lofgren catalogs GOP colleagues' election claims with a view toward discipline

  Taking names: Dem Rep. Lofgren catalogs GOP colleagues' election claims with a view toward discipline Rep. Zoe Lofgren's report examines social media posts and statements from Republican lawmakers who voted against certifying the election results."Like former President [Donald] Trump, any elected member of Congress who aided and abetted the insurrection or incited the attack seriously threatened our democratic government," Lofgren wrote in the prologue to her 1,939 page “social media review.

The report features a collection of social media posts and tweets that span dozens of pages from Arizona Rep. Paul Gosar where he urges supporters to "hold the line," days before what would become the Capitol insurrection. In another social media post included in the report, Gosar wrote that "sedition and treason for stealing votes is appropriate."

The report also captures numerous tweets where Gosar invoked @ali on Twitter, which was formerly the account used by Ali Alexander, a leader of the "Stop the Steal" group, who said in several Periscope livestream videos that he planned the rally that preceded the riot in conjunction with Gosar and two other congressional Republicans, Mo Brooks of Alabama and Andy Biggs of Arizona.

CNN has reached out to Gosar's office for comment.

House Democrats draw the line: No bipartisan cooperation with Republicans who questioned the election .
After the Jan. 6 riot, some Democrats say they simply can't work with anyone who voted against certifying the election.The Massachusetts lawmaker says he knows his constituents want him to work across the aisle, but he's drawing “a sharp red line” at working with Republicans who voted not to certify the Electoral College results as part of then-President Donald Trump's failed bid to overturn his election defeat.

usr: 14
This is interesting!