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Politics Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell rejects claims he will be retire

01:36  31 march  2021
01:36  31 march  2021 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

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Mitch McConnell, Donald Trump that are talking to each other: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell sought to down rumors he was planning an exit after a Republican power play in his home state of Kentucky that ensures he will be succeeded by a Republican if he leaves before his term ends.

'I don't think we're going to have a vacancy. I'm not going anywhere,' McConnell said Tuesday.

He spoke after the GOP-controlled legislature voted Monday to override the veto of Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear after he tried to kill legislation that would require him to fill any temporary vacancy in a Senate seat with a member of the party holding the seat.

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  Mitch McConnell keeps getting caught telling lies: Being minority leader is less fun Whether it's about his filibuster, voting rights or phone calls with Biden, Mitch can't seem to tell the truth Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Michael Clubb-Pool/Getty Images

Mitch McConnell wearing glasses and looking at the camera: 'I'm not going anywhere': Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said he has no plans to retire, despite backing a state legislative effort that will ensure his temporary successor is a Republican should he leave office early or otherwise vacate his seat © Provided by Daily Mail 'I'm not going anywhere': Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said he has no plans to retire, despite backing a state legislative effort that will ensure his temporary successor is a Republican should he leave office early or otherwise vacate his seat

McConnell, 79, was reelected in November, and has served in the Senate since 1985.

After denouncing President Trump for having 'provoked' the January 6th Capitol riot, McConnell has reemerged as the most powerful force countering the Biden agenda in the Senate.

He has threatened 'scorched earth' tactics should Democrats use their narrow majority to force through changes to the legislative filibuster.

'I just got elected to a six-year term. And I'm still the leader of my party in the Senate,' he told reporters in Kentucky.

Kentucky lawmakers override veto of McConnell-backed Senate vacancy plan

  Kentucky lawmakers override veto of McConnell-backed Senate vacancy plan Override of Gov. Andy Beshear's veto of a bill limiting his ability to fill empty U.S. Senate seats sparks speculation Mitch McConnell may step down.Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, the commonwealth's powerful senior senator, threw his support behind Senate Bill 228. That sparked speculation that the 79-year-old statesman, who just got reelected last fall, might be eyeing the exits.

The bill in question requires the governor to select people to temporarily fill any vacancy from the executive committee of the state party controlling the seat – essentially giving McConnell the power to name at least his temporary successor in advance.

Amid the appearance McConnell was pulling the strings, Republican bill sponsor Robert Stivers said this month that McConnell "is not sick" and isn't leaving, the Hill reported.

Mitch McConnell says the GOP won't support the infrastructure plan, report says

  Mitch McConnell says the GOP won't support the infrastructure plan, report says "I think the last thing the economy needs right now is a big, whopping tax increase," McConnell said, according to Politico.At a Kentucky event, McConnell reportedly criticized the package for the impact it could have on debt, and the accompanying proposal to hike taxes on corporations.

McConnell statements come after Trump blasted him in a written statement in February that highlighted the schism within the party.

'Mitch is a dour, sullen, and unsmiling political hack, and if Republican Senators are going to stay with him, they will not win again,' Trump said in a statement issued by his PAC.

McConnell, whose Senate leadership office is steps from where MAGA rioters ran wild, had said Trump was 'practically and morally responsible' for the riot. McConnell also defended House GOP Conference chair Rep. Liz Cheney, who to impeach Trump, although his maneuverings helped ensure Trump's historic second impeachment took place after he had left office.

Since Trump left office, top House Republican leaders have made the trip to Mar-a-Lago, and Trump has repeatedly asserted himself as a force in the party.

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Video: Biden leaves door open for Senate changes to advance agenda (Associated Press)

Mitch McConnell Tries to Have it Both Ways on Corporate Cash .
Mitch McConnell Tries to Have it Both Ways on Corporate CashI thought Twitter had to have it wrong. It wouldn’t be the first time the partisan corners of social media had taken something out of context or intentionally left out part of the statement. There was absolutely no way Senate Republicans’ chief Mitch McConnell had told corporations to stay out of politics — but that they should please keep sending checks to political organs, thank you very much.

usr: 0
This is interesting!