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Politics Mitch McConnell stands by criticism of companies and accuses Democrats of misrepresenting restrictive voting laws

01:05  08 april  2021
01:05  08 april  2021 Source:   cnn.com

Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell rejects claims he will be retire

  Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell rejects claims he will be retire Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said he doesn't think there will be a vacancy for his seat and said he 'isn't going anywhere,' after backing a law to keep his seat in Republican hands.'I don't think we're going to have a vacancy. I'm not going anywhere,' McConnell said Tuesday.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Wednesday that the complaints he had leveled a day earlier at corporations for publicly protesting a new Georgia voting law were not said "very artfully" even as he stood by his criticism of the CEOs who he charged "ought to read the damn bill.".

Senator Mitch McConnell has lashed out at executives with Major League Baseball, Delta and other corporations for criticizing Republican-led efforts in some states to impose restrictions on voting access. Senator Mitch McConnell , Republican of Kentucky, has long argued that corporate campaign donations are a protected, nearly sacred, form of political communication. On Tuesday he made the case that business executives might be better off limiting their free speech to writing checks.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Wednesday that the complaints he had leveled a day earlier at corporations for publicly protesting a new Georgia voting law were not said "very artfully" even as he stood by his criticism of the CEOs who he charged "ought to read the damn bill."

Mitch McConnell wearing a suit and tie: mitch mcconnell corporate america stay out of politics sot vpx_00002911.png © Provided by CNN mitch mcconnell corporate america stay out of politics sot vpx_00002911.png

McConnell also defended changes being made to voting laws by several states and insisted "there is nothing remotely involved in suppressing the vote by the adjustments the Georgia law made."

His remarks came the day after he had said corporations were "stupid" for getting involved in the issue.

Voting rights: Democratic-led states eye expansion amid GOP push to restrict access

  Voting rights: Democratic-led states eye expansion amid GOP push to restrict access Virginia and New Jersey this week joined other Democratic-led states moving ahead with new laws that would expand voting access -- a stark contrast to the Republican rush in statehouses across the country to make voting more difficult. © Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images Voters fill out their ballots at an early voting center at the Mount Vernon Governmental Center on October 31, 2020 in Alexandria, Virginia. According to the Brennan Center for Justice, which has tracked voting measures across the country, 843 bills that would expand voting access, largely offered by Democrats, have been introduced in 47 states.

The political positions of Mitch McConnell are reflected by his United States Senate voting record, public speeches, and interviews, as well as his actions as Senate majority and minority leader. McConnell was known as a pragmatist and a moderate Republican early in his political career

Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell also reiterated his criticism of Joe Biden’s infrastructure plan at a press conference in Kentucky earlier today. Senator Joe Manchin, whose vote will likely determine whether Joe Biden’s infrastructure plan can pass the Senate, has expressed criticism of the proposal. In a radio interview with a local West Virginia station today, Machin said he had serious concerns about Biden’s plan to raise the corporate tax rate to 28% to help pay for the legislation.

"Republicans buy stock, fly on planes and drink Coca-Cola too. So what I'm saying here is this is quite stupid, to jump into the middle of a highly controversial issue, especially when they got their facts wrong," the Kentucky Republican said Tuesday in response to a question at a news conference in Louisville.

"I didn't say that very artfully yesterday. They are certainly entitled to be involved in politics," McConnell told reporters Wednesday in his home state of Kentucky about corporate entities like Delta Airlines, Coca Cola and Major League Baseball. "My principle complaint is that they didn't read the darn bill."

On Wednesday, McConnell highlighted remarks from President Joe Biden asserting that the Georgia law was designed to suppress minority voters and McConnell suggested the corporations didn't do their own assessments before criticizing the law.

Democrats decry “new Jim Crow” as Georgia GOP passes drastic new voting restrictions

  Democrats decry “new Jim Crow” as Georgia GOP passes drastic new voting restrictions Georgia GOP responds to election lies by cutting mail and early voting, even banning water for voters in long lines Former Georgia House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images

McConnell said these companies are “behaving like a woke parallel government” and would “invite serious consequences if they become a vehicle for far-left mobs to hijack our country.” Businesses must not use economic blackmail to spread disinformation and push bad ideas that citizens reject at the ballot box. Corporations that side with the Democrats in criticizing the Georgia election law are engaged in bullying and are hypocrites, since they have no problem doing business in blue states with more restrictive rules on absentee voting than Georgia now has, McConnell said.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) listens as the Senate Rules Committee holds a hearing on the “For the People Act,” which would expand access to voting and other voting reforms, at the Capitol in Washington. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) in recent days has chastised chief executives and corporations for weighing in on a hot-button political issue, in a way that seems to fly in the face of his own past positions on the role of business in politics. And his attempts to clarify the statements appear to downplay the purpose of political contributions: to use one’s dollars to

"The President of the United States called the bill a Jim Crow exercise to suppress voter turnout, presumably based on race because that's what the Jim Crow allegation is. That bastion of conservativism, The Washington Post, gave the President four Pinocchios for lying about it," McConnell said.

McConnell's comments on Biden are an apparent reference to statements Biden made recently where he suggested the new Georgia election law would shorten voting hours. The law does not shorten Georgia's Election Day hours and counties can choose to extend early voting to as early as 7 a.m. ET and as late as 7 p.m. The Washington Post gave Biden "Four Pinocchios" for the comments and CNN has described Biden's remarks as "misleading." Still, the new law imposes new voter identification requirements for absentee ballots, empowers state officials to take over local elections boards, limits the use of ballot drop boxes and makes it a crime to approach voters in line to give them food and water.

Why some Democrats are quietly unhappy with the House’s big voting rights bill

  Why some Democrats are quietly unhappy with the House’s big voting rights bill There’s a debate over whether some of the For the People Act’s provisions are misconceived.Known as HR 1 in the House, where it passed in early March with only a single Democratic defection, and S 1 in the Senate, where it’s co-sponsored by every Democrat except West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin, it’s a bill that Democrats and allied outside advocates argue is urgently necessary to save the country not only from voter suppression, but also from gerrymandering and the malign influences of big and dark money in politics.

Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) says that corporations should stay out of politics and stop inserting themselves into debates over divisive issues. 'It's stupid': McConnell 's warning for corporate America.

McConnell heavily criticized Biden and corporations for spreading disinformation about the new law in a statement. The bill implements voter laws that require, among other things, that voters provide a photo I.D. such as a driver’s license when they submit an absentee ballot. “The Washington Post has repeatedly debunked White House lies about legislation in Georgia: ‘In reality, Election Day hours were not changed and the opportunities to cast a ballot in early voting were expanded.’ Plenty of Democrat -run states allow fewer days of early voting than the new Georgia law requires

McConnell suggested businesses were being scared into reacting to Democratic criticism of the legislation.

"They got intimidated into adopting an interpretation of that by the Georgia Democrats in order to get their way. And what did it cost them? It cost them an All-Star game."

McConnell said there is not a problem in the US getting people to the polls, citing the high turnout of the November election as proof.

"We don't have a turnout problem in this country," he said. "The turnout in 2020 was bigger than any presidential race since 1900 -- 120 years. People's votes are not being suppressed. Voting is more and more convenient all across America. Different states do it differently."

McConnell has repeatedly defended states' efforts tightening the rules related to voting. On Monday, he warned big businesses they would face "serious consequences" after accusing them of employing "economic blackmail" in attempts to influence voting laws.

"From election law to environmentalism to radical social agendas to the Second Amendment, parts of the private sector keep dabbling in behaving like a woke parallel government," the Kentucky Republican said in a statement Monday. "Corporations will invite serious consequences if they become a vehicle for far-left mobs to hijack our country from outside the constitutional order."

Mitch McConnell's Favorability Rating Down 10 Points in Months Since Trump Lost Election

  Mitch McConnell's Favorability Rating Down 10 Points in Months Since Trump Lost Election Though both his job approval and favorability ratings have dropped, the Kentucky Republican easily won his bid for reelection last fall.The Kentucky Republican's favorability rating has also taken a hit in the months since Trump lost his bid for re-election to President Joe Biden.

Lawmakers in all but three states have introduced bills aimed at restricting ballot access, according to a new tally by the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University. Its latest report finds 361 bills restricting voting had been introduced in 47 states as of March 24. The total, released Thursday morning, marks a 43% rise in the number of bills introduced since Brennan last released a count a little over a month ago.

Florida, Arizona and Georgia were all battleground states in 2020 and will host US Senate races in 2022. Republican legislative majorities and GOP governors are moving to make it more difficult to vote in these states, with Georgia becoming the first of them to enact new restrictions this year.

The statements by McConnell earlier this week are particularly notable not only because he has long championed the involvement of corporate money in politics -- a past position he attempted to square with new remarks on Tuesday -- but because the Republican Party traditionally has been more sympathetic to big business.

McConnell has previously supported businesses' involvement in politics, including backing the US Supreme Court's 2010 decision in the Citizens United case, which allowed big businesses more power to spend freely in federal elections. In 2014, he spoke out against Democrats' attempts to allow Congress to set limits on corporate campaign spending in federal elections, calling it a threat to basic speech rights.

Asked about how he squares his support of Citizens United with his call for corporations to stay out of politics in the debate over election laws, McConnell said, "They have a right to participate in the political process. They do."

"But selecting how you do that in a way that doesn't completely alienate an awful lot of people who depend on your products strikes me as not very smart," he said.

How Georgia's new voting law compares to other states .
Georgia's new voting law has sparked outrage from Democrats and even been called "Jim Crow on steroids" by President Joe Biden, but many of its provisions have governed elections in other states across the country for years. From voter ID requirements to ballot drop boxes, and early voting schedules to absentee ballot access, there is little new or unique in the freshly minted Georgia rules. In fact, many of the measures critics are attacking have long been in place in blue states, including Biden's home state of Delaware.

usr: 0
This is interesting!