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Politics Republicans must offer more than criticism on climate and infrastructure

22:50  16 april  2021
22:50  16 april  2021 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

'Child care is infrastructure': Democrats mocked for expanded definition beyond roads and bridges

  'Child care is infrastructure': Democrats mocked for expanded definition beyond roads and bridges Arguments from Democrats in favor of an expanded definition of infrastructure as it relates to President Joe Biden's $2 trillion American Jobs Plan, widely described as an infrastructure package, reached a new level on Wednesday. © Provided by Washington Examiner "Paid leave is infrastructure. Child care is infrastructure. Caregiving is infrastructure," New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand said in a tweet. Paid leave is infrastructure.Child care is infrastructure.Caregiving is infrastructure.

President Joe Biden’s $2 trillion infrastructure plan has been roundly criticized by Republicans as a boondoggle and a gimmick intended to ram through Democratic wish lists on green energy, healthcare, broadband, and more.

  Republicans must offer more than criticism on climate and infrastructure © Provided by Washington Examiner

The plan includes "Green New Deal"-like policies to shift America to net-zero carbon emissions through massive subsidies for wind and solar and battery storage, while largely leaving out other promising renewable energy sources such as hydrogen. Critics fear that the plan would dramatically change America’s economy and risk wiping out the gains from the Trump administration’s economic policies while weakening the natural gas and fossil fuel industry. The Biden plan also leaves out any realistic discussion about how this package of trillions of dollars in spending would be paid for. Except, that is, for raising the corporate tax rate to a level that would represent the highest of any country in the G-7!

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  Opinion: California wildfires. Hurricanes on the coast. Is anywhere safe from the climate crisis? After visiting Tracy, a woman in California who is ready to flee her dream house to escape wildfires and other effects of climate catastrophe, John Sutter traveled halfway across the country, to Duluth, Minnesota to try to answer her question: Where can she go? Is anywhere safe? It turns out, Tracy isn't alone in asking the question.Tracy thought she'd built her forever home. She and her 5-year-old granddaughter live in an energy-efficient house in Northern California that Tracy designed — by a pond that's frequented by otters, ducks and herons (oh my!).

Contrary to Biden’s previous campaign promises not to eliminate the natural gas industry and to embrace innovative technologies to reduce emissions, the Biden plan instead doles out hundreds of billions for a "climate innovation fund," $174 billion in spending on electric vehicles (that consumers aren’t interested in), $40 billion toward "energy efficient" homes, and even $10 billion for a civilian "climate corps."

While it is important to shed light on the true nature of this misnamed Biden infrastructure boondoggle, Republicans should take care not to repeat mistakes of the past when it comes to slamming Democratic energy and environmental proposals. They must also offer viable alternatives to the public. It is not enough to argue against government spending anymore, as both parties have long since abandoned principles of restraint regarding the budget. Democrats may have the majorities in both houses to pass this bill into law, and Republicans must negotiate in good faith to try to curb some of the more extreme aspects of the bill.

OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan | House GOP's planned environmental bills drop Democratic priorities | Advocates optimistic Biden infrastructure plan is a step toward sustainability

  OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan | House GOP's planned environmental bills drop Democratic priorities | Advocates optimistic Biden infrastructure plan is a step toward sustainability IT'S MONDAY! Welcome to Overnight Energy, your source for the day's energy and environment news.Please send tips and comments to Rachel Frazin at rfrazin@thehill.com . Follow her on Twitter: @RachelFrazin . Reach Zack Budryk at zbudryk@thehill.com or follow him on Twitter: @BudrykZack . Signup for our newsletter and others HERE. Today we're looking at President Biden's meeting with bipartisan lawmakers on infrastructure, a forthcoming GOP climate package and ways in which advocates are hoping the infrastructure package contributes to sustainability.

Some Republicans in the Senate are working on a smaller infrastructure proposal, and leaders such as Sam Graves and others have outlined clear infrastructure principles with the BUILDER Act. This bill offers a means to modernize permitting processes and streamline projects. Unfortunately, it has not been met with widespread support by a majority of the caucus. Nor have Republicans coalesced around a serious messaging plan to raise awareness of their legislative activity. Republicans need to unify around a single set of principles and a single proposal. We must offer a serious alternative or risk suffering yet more negative political fallout.

Samantha Dravis is a visiting fellow at the Independent Women’s Forum. She served as an associate administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under President Donald Trump.

Tags: Opinion, Beltway Confidential, Blog Contributors, Energy and Environment, Climate Change, Budgets and Deficits, Republican Party, Infrastructure

Original Author: Samantha Dravis

Original Location: Republicans must offer more than criticism on climate and infrastructure

Summit shows Biden big vision on fighting climate change .
WASHINGTON (AP) — What did the world learn at Joe Biden's global summit about his vision of the battle to save the world’s climate? For two days, Biden and his team of climate experts pressed his case that tackling global warming not only can avert an existential threat, but also benefit the U.S. economy — and the world’s as well. The virtual summit, based at the White House and featuring more than 40 world leaders whose views were beamed to a global online audience, offered fresh details on how the U.S. might hope to supercharge its efforts on climate while leveraging international action to spur new technologies to help save the planet.

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