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Politics EU politician calls for U.S. to sanction Russian gas pipeline

22:55  16 april  2021
22:55  16 april  2021 Source:   thehill.com

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A top European Union politician is encouraging the U.S. to sanction a Russian gas pipeline headed for Germany, as part of efforts to push back on Moscow's destabilizing efforts more broadly.

a person wearing a blue shirt: EU politician calls for U.S. to sanction Russian gas pipeline © Getty Images EU politician calls for U.S. to sanction Russian gas pipeline

Radosław Sikorski, the interparliamentary delegation chair for the European Union, was in Washington this week meeting with Biden administration officials and Congressional lawmakers on E.U. and U.S. priorities.

Sikorski, who served as Poland's foreign minister between 2007 and 2014, said that the U.S. position on the Russian gas pipeline Nord Stream 2 was at the top of discussions he had with lawmakers and administration officials.

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He met with House Foreign Affairs Chairman Gregory Meeks (D-N.Y.); Rep. Jim Costa (D-Calif.), chair of the Transatlantic Legislators' Dialogue caucus; and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.), the chair of the Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee on Europe And Regional Security Cooperation.

"I made the point that if the U.S. imposes sanctions they should be effective," Sikorski said in an interview with The Hill.

U.S. sanctions on Nord Stream 2 were noticeably absent from a raft of economic actions targeting Russia that were announced by President Biden on Thursday. The actions were a response to Moscow's cyber attacks, election interference and threats against American troops in Afghanistan.

Biden addressed his decision to hold off sanctioning the pipeline in remarks to reporters at the White House, saying it is a complicated issue affecting allies in Europe.

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"I've been opposed to Nord Stream 2 for a long time, from the beginning... when I was out of office and even before office, when we - before I left office as Vice President. But that still is an issue that is in play."

Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle support expanded sanctions on the pipeline, which is believed to be between 90 and 95 percent complete.

The Trump administration on its last day in office sanctioned the Russian vessel Fortuna for its involvement in the pipeline's construction, but lawmakers say they have identified more than a dozen entities working on the pipeline that should be sanctioned.

Sikorski said that Europe is divided on the pipeline, accusing Germany of behaving "selfishly" for putting its own economic interests ahead of concerns shared by other E.U. member countries, in particular Central and Eastern European countries like Poland. He also noted concerns from Ukraine, which holds close relations with the E.U. and where gas exports are key drivers of its economy.

Forthcoming Russia sanctions won't include Nord Stream 2

  Forthcoming Russia sanctions won't include Nord Stream 2 DOJ's legal approval for a new slate of sanctions to stop the Russia-Germany pipeline was reversed recently.The Justice Department gave legal sign-off last month to at least two sanctions packages targeting Nord Stream 2 AG, the company responsible for the planning, construction and subsequent operation of the pipeline, and its CEO Matthias Warnig. But that legal approval was reversed last week amid an ongoing internal debate over which entities meet the legal threshold for sanctions, according to three people familiar with the matter.

"I recognize that the U.S. has a dilemma whether to back Germany or Central and Eastern Europe, but it's an issue over which Germany behaves selfishly, putting its economic interests ahead of the interests of the entire West and of the economic interests of Central and Eastern Europe and I just hope that U.S. sanctions succeed," he said.

"The E.U. is torn on this because there is a fundamental difference of opinion between E.U. members. There are some that are in favor and some that are fundamentally opposed."

On policy towards Russia, Sikorski said the U.S. and E.U. are aligned but urged in his meetings for Washington to do more to support Ukraine in the face of aggression from Moscow by increasing lethal assistance to Kyiv, in particular Javelin anti-tank missiles.

Ukraine has purchased 360 of these missiles and 47 launchers from the U.S., between 2018 and 2019.

"I advised my interlocutors that President Putin, by threatening Ukraine, is giving us a good opportunity that should not be wasted by reinforcing Ukraine militarily," Sikorski said.

"We should impose an embargo on Russian gas imports, that would resolve the Nord Stream problem at a stroke, and if Russia waged war and changed borders by force in Europe, again, we should cut it off from the SWIFT systems," he added, referring to the global financial messaging network.

Biden administration officials along with European allies have condemned large Russian troop build ups on Ukraine's border and on the Crimean peninsula, which Moscow illegally annexed in 2014.

But the head of the U.S. European Command Gen. Tod Wolters told lawmakers on Thursday that there is a "low to medium risk" of a Russian invasion, despite the largest massing of Russian troops on Ukraines border since fighting broke out in 2014.

Russian troops start pulling back from Ukrainian border .
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian troops began pulling back to their permanent bases Friday after a massive buildup that caused Ukrainian and Western concerns. On Thursday, Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu declared the sweeping maneuvers in Crimea and wide swaths of western Russia over, and ordered the military to pull the troops that took part in them back to their permanent bases by May 1. At the same time, he ordered their heavy weapons kept in western Russia for another massive military exercise called Zapad (West) 2021 later this year.

usr: 0
This is interesting!