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Politics Trump says Biden's plan to withdraw US troops from Afghanistan is a 'wonderful and positive thing to do'

14:40  19 april  2021
14:40  19 april  2021 Source:   businessinsider.com

Why America Can't End Its 'Forever Wars'

  Why America Can't End Its 'Forever Wars' The U.S. military's new way of fighting, developed after two decades at war, traps us in conflicts that last forever.Though the new administration seems intent on ending America's oldest war and there is growing fatigue over endless wars in the Middle East, and though the Pentagon is scrambling to refocus resources and attention away from counterterrorism to big war pursuits against the likes of Russia and China, war isn't going to actually end. That's because there is something about the way the United States fights—about how it has learned to fight in Afghanistan and on other 21st-century battlefields—that facilitates endless war.

Joe Biden, Donald Trump are posing for a picture: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images, Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images © Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images, Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images, Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
  • Donald Trump said President Joe Biden's plan to withdraw troops from Afghanistan later this year is a "wonderful and positive thing to do."
  • He urged the president to withdraw the troops even sooner.
  • Republican Senator Lindsey Graham tweeted that he "could not disagree more," with the former president.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Former President Donald Trump has praised President Joe Biden's plan to withdraw all remaining US troops from Afghanistan as a "wonderful and positive thing to do," drawing criticism from some Republicans.

Biden to withdraw all US forces from Afghanistan by Sept. 11

  Biden to withdraw all US forces from Afghanistan by Sept. 11 President Joe Biden will make the announcement on Wednesday, according to a senior administration official. There are roughly 2,500 U.S. troops in Afghanistan now. American troop levels reached a high of 100,000 troops in August 2010 and stayed at that level for much of the next year.

Biden on Wednesday formally announced that he planned to withdraw all troops stationed in Afghanistan by September 11, bringing an end to what he called "America's longest war."

US coordinates Afghanistan pullout with NATO withdrawal

  US coordinates Afghanistan pullout with NATO withdrawal BRUSSELS (AP) — U.S. President Joe Biden’s top national security aides were consulting with NATO on Wednesday to coordinate the alliance’s withdrawal from Afghanistan with the planned pullout of American troops by the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin were meeting senior officials from the alliance’s 30 members on Wednesday to discuss NATO’s future presence in Afghanistan in light of the announcement of the U.S. withdrawal that Biden was to make later in the day.Blinken said that he expected the allies to withdraw together but maintained that neither the U.S.

Trump praised the decision, but urged the president to pull troops out before the symbolic September 11 deadline, which marks the 20th anniversary of the deadly terrorist attacks which prompted the start of US involvement in a decades-long conflict in Afghanistan.

"Getting out of Afghanistan is a wonderful and positive thing to do. I planned to withdraw on May 1st, and we should keep as close to that schedule as possible," Trump said in a statement on Sunday.

He added: "I wish Joe Biden wouldn't use September 11th as the date to withdraw our troops from Afghanistan, for two reasons."

Afghanistan: Why the US is there, why it's leaving, what will happen when it's gone

  Afghanistan: Why the US is there, why it's leaving, what will happen when it's gone President Joe Biden's promise to remove US troops from Afghanistan by September 11 is his effort -- each of the last four presidents has had one -- to end America's longest war.The deadline for Biden's withdrawal is significant -- September 11, 2021, is 20 years after the 9/11 terror attacks in New York, Washington, DC, and Pennsylvania that led the US to target Afghanistan in the first place.

"First, we can and should get out earlier. Nineteen years is enough, in fact far too much and way too long [...] Secondly, September 11th represents a very sad event and period for our country and should remain a day of reflection and remembrance honoring those great souls we lost."

Trump's praise for the pullout drew condemnation from Republican South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham, who tweeted that "I could not disagree more," with the former president.

"With all due respect to former President Trump, there is nothing 'wonderful' or 'positive' about allowing safe havens and sanctuary for terrorists to reemerge in Afghanistan or see Afghanistan be drawn back into another civil war," he tweeted.

There are an estimated 3,500 US troops currently serving in Afghanistan, the New York Times reported.

Biden formally announced his plan to withdraw US troops from Afghanistan on Wednesday, saying it was "time to end America's longest war."

'The progress Afghanistan has made ... will all be for naught,' retired general fears

  'The progress Afghanistan has made ... will all be for naught,' retired general fears President Biden has ordered the last 2,500 US troops home by Sept. 11, giving the Taliban as well as al-Qaeda room to grab power, ex-general says.The estimated 2,500 U.S. troops that President Biden has ordered home offered some slim assurance that the Afghan government could withstand the Taliban insurgency that has re-emerged across the country of 37 million.

"I'm now the fourth United States president to preside over American troop presence in Afghanistan: two Republicans, two Democrats. I will not pass this responsibility on to a fifth," he said.

Lawmakers have been divided on the wisdom of the move. Democratic Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said the plan was "careful and thought-out" but several top Republicans condemned it.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell criticized the plan, saying US troops in Afghanistan had "helped keep radical Islamic terrorism in check."

"Apparently, we're to help our adversaries ring in the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks by gift-wrapping the country and handing it right back to them," McConnell said.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Graham: 'I could not disagree more' with Trump support of Afghanistan troop withdrawal .
Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) on Sunday pushed back on former President Trump's support for removing all troops from Afghanistan, writing on Twitter that he "could not disagree more with former President Trump regarding his support for President Biden's withdrawal of all forces from Afghanistan against sound military advice."Earlier on Sunday, Trump released a statement criticizing Biden's goal for all troops to be pulled out of Afghanistan by Sept. 11, but saying that "Getting out of Afghanistan is a wonderful and positive thing to do.""I planned to withdraw on May 1st, and we should keep as close to that schedule as possible," Trump wrote.

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