•   
  •   
  •   

Politics Maxine Waters repudiates Chauvin trial judge who criticized her 'confrontational' protest comments

04:25  20 april  2021
04:25  20 april  2021 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

Prosecution case nears end in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death

  Prosecution case nears end in ex-cop's trial in Floyd death MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The trial of a former Minneapolis police officer charged in George Floyd 's death enters its third week Monday, with the state nearing the end of a case built on searing witness accounts, official rejections of the neck restraint and expert testimony attributing Floyd's death to a lack of oxygen. Derek Chauvin, 45, who is white, is charged with murder and manslaughter in Floyd’s May 25 death. Police were called to a neighborhood market where Floyd, who was Black, was accused of trying to pass a counterfeit bill.

Rep. Maxine Waters dismissed the concerns raised by a judge who criticized her encouraging protesters to get "confrontational" if former police officer Derek Chauvin is acquitted in the killing George Floyd.

Maxine Waters et al. posing for the camera © Provided by Washington Examiner

"The judge says my words don’t matter," the California Democrat repeatedly said, according to CNN's Manu Raju.

When pressed on Judge Peter Cahill's observation that Waters's comments could be grounds for an appeal by the defense, Waters replied, "Oh no, no, they didn’t."

Earlier on Monday, Cahill said Waters's comments over the weekend demanding a guilty verdict for Chauvin could result in the trial being overturned.

"I'll give you that congresswoman Waters may have given you something on appeal that may result in this whole trial being overturned," Cahill said in response to comments by a defense attorney.

CHAUVIN JUDGE SAYS MAXINE WATERS'S COMMENTS COULD LEAD TO OVERTURNING OF TRIAL ON APPEAL

The Minnesota judge called on politicians to stop speaking publicly about the trial, saying their commentary is disrespectful to the separation of powers.

"This goes back to what I've been saying since the beginning. I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case, especially in a manner that is disrespectful to the rule of law and to the judicial branch and our function," he said. "I think if they want to give their opinions, they should do so in a respectful [way] and in a manner that is consistent with their oath to the Constitution to respect a coequal branch of government. Their failure to do so, I think, is abhorrent."

The judge in the Derek Chauvin case is orchestrating one of the nation’s most widely watched murder trials. Meet Peter Cahill.

  The judge in the Derek Chauvin case is orchestrating one of the nation’s most widely watched murder trials. Meet Peter Cahill. While Judge Peter Cahill allowed cameras in the courtroom for the first time in Minnesota state history, he's also been strict on other matters.That is exactly where Hennepin County District Court Judge Peter Cahill finds himself in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin, entering its sixth week and bringing daily controversy and scrutiny to every step taken in the courtroom.

As Waters said, Cahill denied the defense's motion for a mistrial, saying, "A congresswoman's opinion really doesn't matter a whole lot."

The courtroom remarks allude to recent comments by Waters, who demanded Chauvin be found “guilty, guilty, guilty" in the killing of Floyd folllwing an arrest in Minneapolis last May.

“We’re looking for a guilty verdict,” she told a crowd of protesters on Saturday. “And we’re looking to see if all of the talk that took place and has been taking place after they saw what happened to George Floyd, if nothing does not happen, then we know that we’ve got to not only stay in the street, but we’ve got to fight for justice.”

Waters urged demonstrators to "get more confrontational" if Chauvin is acquitted.

Her comments attracted widespread criticism, with Republicans calling for her expulsion from Congress for incitement. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene introduced a resolution that would remove Waters from Congress, and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy announced his intention to propose a censure resolution.

EXPLAINER: Why is 'excited delirium' cited at Chauvin trial?

  EXPLAINER: Why is 'excited delirium' cited at Chauvin trial? MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The attorney for the former Minneapolis police officer on trial in George Floyd ’s death revisited the disputed concept of excited delirium Tuesday in an effort to show that the force Derek Chauvin used was objectively reasonable given Floyd's resistance. Chauvin, 45, who is white, is charged with murder and manslaughter. Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, was arrested outside a neighborhood market on May 25, accused of trying to pass a counterfeit $20 bill. A panicky-sounding Floyd struggled and claimed to be claustrophobic as police tried to put him in a squad car.

"This weekend in Minnesota, Maxine Waters broke the law by violating curfew and then incited violence," McCarthy said in a tweet Monday evening. "Speaker Pelosi is ignoring Waters’ behavior—that’s why I am introducing a resolution to censure Rep. Waters for these dangerous comments."

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi disputed Republicans' interpretation of Waters's remarks, saying she didn't need to apologize because she wasn't inciting violence.

"No, I don't think she should apologize," Pelosi said in response Monday. "Maxine talked about confrontation in the manner of the civil rights movement."

Asked whether the comments from Waters incited violence, the speaker said, “No, absolutely not.”

Waters's remarks reflect the views of many on the Left, who believe Chauvin's actions led to Floyd's death. On May 25 last year, Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, was arrested after allegedly using a counterfeit $20 bill. When law enforcement attempted to apprehend him, officers pinned him to the ground, and Chauvin, who is white, placed his knee on Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes, during which Floyd said, "I can't breathe." Floyd died following the incident.

Attorneys at Chauvin trial in Floyd death make final pitch

  Attorneys at Chauvin trial in Floyd death make final pitch MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Attorneys in the trial of a former Minneapolis police officer charged with killing George Floyd are set to make their closing arguments Monday, each side seeking to distill three weeks of testimony to persuade jurors to deliver their view of the right verdict. For prosecutors, Derek Chauvin recklessly squeezed the life from Floyd as he and two other officers pinned him to the street for 9 minutes, 29 seconds outside a corner market, despite Floyd's repeated cries that he couldn't breathe — actions they say warrant conviction not just for manslaughter but also on two murder counts.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

Floyd's death led to nationwide protests last summer and conversations about officers' use of force, particularly when apprehending minorities. Similar scenes have played out in the last week after the police shooting of Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old black man. Wright was shot and killed by former officer Kimberly Potter during a traffic stop on Sunday in nearby Brooklyn Center. Minnesota called in the National Guard to respond to the unrest.

Chauvin has pleaded not guilty to charges of third-degree murder, second-degree murder, and manslaughter. Attorneys made closing arguments on Monday and jurors are now deliberating their verdict in the case.

Tags: News, Maxine Waters, George Floyd, Derek Chauvin, Judge, Court

Original Author: Carly Roman

Original Location: Maxine Waters repudiates Chauvin trial judge who criticized her 'confrontational' protest comments

DOJ weighs charging Chauvin for 2017 incident involving Black teen: Source .
Federal investigators probing Derek Chauvin's use of force against George Floyd are also weighing charging him for a 2017 incident involving a Black teen, a source said. The videos, from Sept. 4, 2017, allegedly showed Chauvin striking a Black teenager in the head so hard that the boy needed stitches, then allegedly holding the boy down with his knee for nearly 17 minutes, and allegedly ignoring complaints from the boy that he couldn't breathe.

usr: 2
This is interesting!