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Politics Pressure on Big Tech from Republicans is working

08:05  25 april  2021
08:05  25 april  2021 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

Hillicon Valley: Biden administration sanctions Russia for SolarWinds hack, election interference

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Despite bipartisan agreement that Big Tech has monopoly power, differences on how to fix the problem raise doubts about sweeping tech regulation. Even though Democrats and Republicans are in broad agreement that the tech titans have monopoly power, party differences on how to fix the problem make it doubtful sweeping regulation will come to pass. Google CEO Sundar Pichai testifies before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law during a hearing on "Online Platforms and Market Power" in the Rayburn House office Building on Capitol Hill, in Washington, July

Republicans and Democrats agree that Big Tech has too much power. They also agree that something needs to be done about it. But they disagree on just about everything else, and as hearings are scheduled, subpoenas are issued and lawsuits are filed, partisan conflicts over the means could Republicans are focused on censorship, arguing that platforms like Twitter and Facebook silence conservative voices. The Republican -controlled Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote this week on whether to subpoena Twitter’s Jack Dorsey and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg to testify about

The recent pressure on Big Tech from Republicans is working, and they should keep it up.

Josh Hawley wearing a suit and tie © Provided by Washington Examiner

On Monday, Apple announced that it will allow Parler back on its App Store. Apple’s decision comes in response to a letter sent a few weeks ago by Colorado Republican Rep. Ken Buck and Utah Republican Sen. Mike Lee to Apple, Google, and Amazon over their treatment of Parler in the wake of the events on Jan. 6 at the Capitol. They demanded answers on whether the companies handled Parler’s suspensions differently from their usual review processes and whether they coordinated at all in their actions. The congressmen got more than an answer; they got a reversal of Apple’s decision.

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“Unless Republicans have a death wish, and it is also the right thing to do, they must approve the 00 payments ASAP,” Trump tweeted. “Also, get rid of Section 230 — Don’t let Big Tech steal our Country, and don’t let the Democrats steal the Presidential Election. Major tech companies and other sites and services — from small apps to large news publishers — maintain the decades-old Section 230 rules facilitate free online speech and give platform owners the legal leeway to moderate those posts without fear of lawsuits. Trump and his allies, however, have labored to undo the rules over unproven

As the US, Europe and Australia increase their legislative & judicial pressure on Big Tech , why are investment This was just the beginning of a trend from lawmakers everywhere asking Big Tech to be good corporate Several Republicans were also frustrated that the report didn’t address claims of

This letter is just one of several recent efforts by Republicans to challenge the actions of Big Tech. Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida recently addressed a letter to Amazon questioning its removal of Ryan T. Anderson’s book on transgender issues, When Harry Became Sally, with Sens. Lee, Josh Hawley of Missouri, and Mike Braun of Indiana.

Earlier this month, Hawley unveiled legislation, called the "Trust-Busting For the 21st Century Act," with the intent of prohibiting Big Tech companies from buying up competitors or startups and opening up the market for new businesses. Hawley signaled that he wants to see companies such as Facebook, Google, and Amazon broken up. This legislation is a direct threat against their abusive behavior.

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House panel’s probe into Big Tech reportedly draws skepticism from Republicans . A key congressional committee is poised to call for a crackdown on Big Tech companies — but some Republicans are already balking at its proposals, according to reports. The House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust panel is expected to release a highly anticipated report this week detailing the findings of its yearlong probe into the market dominance of Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook.

In the House, Republican staff on the House Energy and Commerce Committee recently distributed a memo as part of their "Big Tech Accountability Platform" to bring “much-needed reform and oversight to Big Tech.” The memo suggests a variety of ways Congress could remove liability protections granted to tech platforms under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. And Buck, who last October released an antitrust report on Big Tech called “The Third Way,” is also expected to introduce a series of antitrust bills targeting the tech industry soon.

Republicans have not previously been in favor of intervening to counter Big Tech’s power because of their stance on preserving the free market system. But in just the last few months, Facebook and Twitter removed President Donald Trump from their platforms, Apple, Google, and Amazon banned Parler from their app stores and withdrew their support services, and Amazon stopped selling Anderson’s book, among others. As a result, many Republicans are now acknowledging that this drastic increase in online censorship and the clear coordination of censorship efforts have crossed a serious threshold and have changed the political calculus for Republicans in taking on Big Tech.

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US tech companies have faced increased scrutiny in Washington over their size and power in recent years. The investigation by the House Judiciary Committee is just one of multiple probes firms such as Facebook and Apple are facing. The 449-page report, penned by committee staff, accused the companies In fact, from what we've already heard from Republicans many of the recommendations are "non-starters" for conservatives. It's also been reported that some Republicans were angered by omissions in the report. Republicans wanted sections on alleged anti-conservative bias - which was

Big Tech , Big Pharma and Big Media are now actively colluding to silence all doctors, websites, videos and online content that explains why hydroxychloroquine can save lives and end the coronavirus pandemic in mere weeks. In other words, Big Tech is now complicit in the mass murder of Americans in order to protect the profit interests of Big Pharma. This is where we are now in America: A criminal conspiracy of powerful corporations is now blacklisting critical knowledge for human health. They are doing it on purpose.

This broader shift against Big Tech taking place in the Republican Party can also be attributed in part to Trump and his administration, as they were willing to undertake a broad-scale regulatory scrutiny of technology companies and repeatedly called on Congress to bring fairness to Big Tech. And when the Department of Justice filed its monumental antitrust lawsuit against Google under Attorney General William Barr’s leadership, the tide really started to turn.

And it isn’t just politicians whose perspectives are shifting. A majority of Republican voters now favor the government regulating social media giants and breaking up Big Tech, according to a Center for Growth and Opportunity poll released in February. Fifty-six percent of Republicans, plus around half of independent voters, said they favored breaking up Big Tech companies.

The message now coming from Republicans is clear: Big Tech has gone too far, and we won’t tolerate it any longer. The chorus of voices on the Hill willing to hold the Silicon Valley giants accountable is only growing. The good news, as shown by Apple’s decision this week, is that the new approach is working. Republicans must continue to keep the pressure on Big Tech.

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Clare Morell is a policy analyst at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, where she works on the EPPC’s Big Tech Project. Prior to joining the EPPC, she worked in both the White House counsel’s office and the Department of Justice, as well as in the private and nonprofit sectors.

Tags: Opinion, Op-Eds, Technology, Amazon, Apple, Parler, Josh Hawley, Republican Party, Censorship, Antitrust, Congress

Original Author: Clare Morell

Original Location: Pressure on Big Tech from Republicans is working

Democrats shun Hawley Big Tech reforms that include many of their proposals .
Missouri Republican Josh Hawley is struggling to gain support for his anti-tech monopoly legislation from both parties because of the controversy following his actions the day of the Capitol attack. © Provided by Washington Examiner In the past few weeks, Hawley has introduced two Big Tech-bashing bills that have not received any support from Democrats or Republicans, even though his policies are popular and there is bipartisan agreement to hold the tech giants more accountable through increased regulation and government intervention.

usr: 3
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