•   
  •   
  •   

Politics McConnell says GOP open to $600 billion for infrastructure

00:30  04 may  2021
00:30  04 may  2021 Source:   msn.com

Joe Manchin urges Biden to focus on 'conventional' infrastructure

  Joe Manchin urges Biden to focus on 'conventional' infrastructure Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia, an influential Democrat, called for focusing on 'conventional' infrastructure and suggested splitting off parts of Joe Biden's $2.3 trillion plan.‘What we think the greatest need we have now, that can be done in a bipartisan way, is conventional infrastructure whether it's the water, sewer, roads, bridges, Internet — things that we know need to be repaired, be fixed,’ the influential West Virginia Democrat said at a press conference Friday.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Monday that Republicans are willing to spend up to $600 billion on infrastructure, far less than President Joe Biden is seeking, even as he ruled out supporting a higher corporate tax rate to pay for it.

FILE - In this April 20, 2021, file photo, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., talks after a GOP policy luncheon, on Capitol Hill in Washington. McConnell says Republicans are willing to spend up to $600 billion for roads, bridges and other projects. That's far less than what President Joe Biden is seeking, but is in line with a new $568 billion proposal put forward by other Senate Republicans.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this April 20, 2021, file photo, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., talks after a GOP policy luncheon, on Capitol Hill in Washington. McConnell says Republicans are willing to spend up to $600 billion for roads, bridges and other projects. That's far less than what President Joe Biden is seeking, but is in line with a new $568 billion proposal put forward by other Senate Republicans. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Instead McConnell is endorsing the $568 billion public works plan from his Republican colleagues that has a smaller price tag, a narrower definition of infrastructure and is funded by fees rather than tax increases.

The politics of going big

  The politics of going big Women and people of color were crucial to Biden’s presidential win, and they’re crucial to his jobs plan.Taken together, President Joe Biden’s $2.25 trillion American Jobs Plan and newly introduced $1.8 trillion American Families Plan come out to slightly over $4 trillion in proposed new spending. It’s an enormous investment in American job creation; the last bipartisan infrastructure bill Congress passed in 2015 clocked in at about $305 billion — about one-thirteenth the size of Biden’s proposed plan. And Obama’s $800 billion stimulus plan of 2009 was about one-fifth of Biden’s plan, not even taking into account the $1.

“We’re open to doing a roughly $600 billion package, which deals with what all of us agree is infrastructure and to talk about how to pay for that in any way other than reopening the 2017 tax reform bill,” McConnell said Monday at the University of Louisville.

McConnell had been clear before Monday that Senate Republicans would not go along with Biden’s initial $2.3 trillion infrastructure proposal, but his remarks were the strongest signal yet that a smaller deal is possible. Yet a core dividing line remains Biden’s effort to pay for infrastructure by undoing Donald Trump’s tax break for corporations, which GOP lawmakers consider a signature achievement.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., leaves a meeting with fellow Republicans on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 29, 2021, the day after President Joe Biden addressed Congress on his first 100 days in office. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) © Provided by Associated Press Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., leaves a meeting with fellow Republicans on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 29, 2021, the day after President Joe Biden addressed Congress on his first 100 days in office. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

With Democrats holding only slim majorities in the House and Senate, Biden and congressional leaders will soon have to decide how they plan to muscle his priority legislation into law. Biden has been reaching out to Republicans and seeking their input, even as some in his party agitate to move ahead without GOP support.

McConnell says focus is on 'stopping' Biden agenda as Trump continues to push election lies

  McConnell says focus is on 'stopping' Biden agenda as Trump continues to push election lies Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Wednesday that his focus was on “stopping” President Biden’s administration, citing the unity in his caucus. “One hundred percent of my focus is on stopping this new administration,” McConnell said during a press conference in Kentucky when asked if he was concerned that Republicans who acknowledged Biden as the rightful winner of the 2020 election could face political liabilities. “One hundred percent of my focus is on standing up to this administration,” McConnell continued. “What we have in the United States Senate is total unity from [moderate Maine Sen.] Susan Collins to [conservative Texas Sen.

McConnell said that raising corporate taxes would lead to job losses to overseas competitors with lower rates. He said “users” of the infrastructure should help pay for it. One example is the federal gas tax, which pays for road and bridge improvements and has not been increased since 1993. McConnell was not specific about what user fee increases Republicans could back.

“So how to pay for the infrastructure bill, on our side, is we’re not going to revisit the 2017 tax bill,” McConnell said. “We’re happy to look for traditional infrastructure pay-fors, which means the users participate.”

McConnell cited concerns about the federal debt, even though deficits grew substantially every year of Trump’s presidency, when the GOP was also in control of the Senate.

“I think it’s time to take a look at our national debt, which is now as large as our economy for the first time since World War II,” McConnell said.

Biden still 'ready to compromise' on infrastructure plan despite McConnell comments

  Biden still 'ready to compromise' on infrastructure plan despite McConnell comments President Joe Biden said he's "willing to hear ideas from both sides" of the aisle to get an infrastructure deal done, but Sen. Mitch McConnell stands in the way. "I’m willing to hear ideas from both sides," Biden said. "I’m ready to compromise. What I’m not ready to do, I’m not ready to do nothing. I’m not ready to have another period where America has another infrastructure month and doesn't change a damn thing.

Biden’s infrastructure proposal would lead to an eventual reduction of the debt if the tax hikes are fully enacted. He would raise the corporate tax rate from 21% to 28% to pay for it, reverting to what had been the corporate rate before the 2017 GOP tax cut was enacted.

The 2017 GOP tax bill, which all the Republicans voted for, slashed the corporate rate from 35% to 21%. It was supposed to usher in a new era of American investment and job creation, yet growth never came close to the promised levels.

The deficit came in at $587 billion for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 2016, then shot to $668 billion in Trump’s first year. It nearly hit $1 trillion in year 3 and jumped to $3.1 trillion in 2020, in large part because of the country’s response to the coronavirus pandemic.

This year, the deficit has continued its surge. Nancy Vanden Houten, senior economist at Oxford Economics, said she expects the deficit for this budget year will total $3.3 trillion, an all-time high and up 6.5% from last year’s record shortfall.

Federal debt levels hit nearly $27 trillion at the end of the latest fiscal year.

Democrats counter that Republican lawmakers didn’t seem as concerned about deficits when Trump was president.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said last week that investments in education “brings more money than anything back to the Treasury.”

“All of a sudden, they’re deficit hawks when they were giving away money to the wealthiest people in our country under President Trump,” Pelosi said in a CBS interview.

____

Freking reported from Washington.

Biden's infrastructure plan wouldn't protect the Colonial Pipeline from another attack .
The president's proposal includes $400 billion to support home care workers but doesn't address securing vital infrastructure from cyberattacks.The attack on Colonial Pipeline is one data point in an overall trend of increased attacks from ransomware, malicious software that prevents victims from accessing their data and requires a ransom payment in order to restore their systems. The consequences can range from the economically costly to the downright dire: Businesses get locked out of their computer systems for several hours or days at a time, halting operations, disrupting supply chains and significantly harming consumer trust.

usr: 2
This is interesting!