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Politics Overnight Health Care: WHO-backed Covax gets a boost from Moderna

02:25  04 may  2021
02:25  04 may  2021 Source:   thehill.com

The world is in the midst of its worst Covid crisis so far. It didn't have to be this way

  The world is in the midst of its worst Covid crisis so far. It didn't have to be this way A year ago, when the Covid-19 pandemic was still in its relative infancy, the head of the World Health Organization stressed that a global approach would be the only way out of the crisis. © Fariha Farooqui/Getty Images MUMBAI, INDIA - APRIL 29: People line up to receive their Covid-19 vaccines at a mass vaccination center on April 29, 2021 in Mumbai, India. With recorded cases crossing 380,000 a day and 3000 deaths in the last 24 hours, India has more than 2 million active cases of Covid-19, the second-highest number in the world after the U.S.

Moderna will supply 34 million doses of its COVID-19 vaccine this year and Sweden has donated 1 million AstraZeneca shots to the global COVAX programme, a small boost as it struggles to get stocks to inoculate the world's poorest people. The advance purchase contract agreed with Moderna is The agreement follows the U.S. drugmaker's shot being approved for emergency use listing by the WHO on Friday, a prerequisite for COVAX eligibility. GAVI runs the COVAX vaccine sharing facility with the World Health Organization. The Swedish donation is the second by a European Union member after

Moderna will supply 34 million doses of its COVID-19 vaccine this year and Sweden has donated 1 million AstraZeneca shots to the global COVAX programme, a small boost as it struggles to get stocks to inoculate the world's poorest people. The advance purchase contract agreed with Moderna is for up to 500 million doses, but the roll out will only start in the fourth quarter, with 34 million doses available this year, the GAVI vaccine alliance said on Monday. additional reporting by John Miller in Zurich, writing by Stephanie Nebehay, editing by Josephine Mason and Louise Heavens.

Welcome to Monday's Overnight Health Care. We've all seen and heard young children, and cats, interrupt interviews throughout the pandemic. Meet Misneach, a Bernese Mountain Dog puppy who just wanted attention. Misneach belongs to Ireland's President Michael Higgins, who was slightly occupied with an interview.

a man standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) arrives to address reporters at her weekly on-camera press conference © Greg Nash Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) arrives to address reporters at her weekly on-camera press conference

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What India's 2nd COVID-19 wave may mean for Africa

  What India's 2nd COVID-19 wave may mean for Africa As India grapples with a second wave of COVID-19 infections that has pushed its health system to the brink of collapse, officials in Africa are on high alert. "What’s happening in India must not happen here," Dr. Matshidiso Moeti, the World Health Organization's regional director for Africa, said at a virtual press briefing last Thursday. "If we prepare now, we will not pay the price later.

Share this Story: COVAX gets boost from Moderna deal, Sweden's donation of COVID-19 vaccines -GAVI. Copy Link. The WHO has repeatedly urged wealthier countries to share excess doses to help inoculate health workers in low-income countries and tame the pandemic which has killed more than 3.3 million. But COVAX has also been hit by supply problems for COVID-19 vaccines, notably the AstraZeneca shot made in India, where authorities have restricted exports because of its fast-growing epidemic.

GENEVA — Moderna will supply 34 million doses of its COVID-19 vaccine this year and Sweden has donated 1 million AstraZeneca shots to the global COVAX program, a small boost as it struggles to get stocks to inoculate the world's poorest people. The advance purchase contract agreed with Moderna The deal expands the program's pipeline of vaccines to eight and contains options to potentially access doses of variant-adapted vaccines in the future, it said. The agreement follows the US drugmaker's shot being approved for emergency use listing by the WHO on Friday, a prerequisite for COVAX eligibility.

Today: The WHO-backed Covax initiative will get a boost from Moderna, but it won't do much for short-term supply issues. Speaker Pelosi said a return to normalcy won't happen until more lawmakers get vaccinated, and the CDC said a brief Ebola epidemic in the Congo is now over.

We'll start with Moderna:

Moderna providing up to 500M vaccine doses to Covax program for lower-income countries

Moderna committed to providing up to 500 million doses of its COVID-19 vaccine to a United Nations-backed initiative designed to supply vaccinations to middle- and low-income countries.

The company announced an agreement with Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance to sell an initial 34 million doses to COVAX at the "lowest tiered price" within the fourth quarter of this year. The deal also permits Gavi to purchase 466 million additional vaccine doses in 2022.

WHO Places Heat-Sensing Sticker on China's Sinopharm COVID Shot So Workers Know if it's Viable

  WHO Places Heat-Sensing Sticker on China's Sinopharm COVID Shot So Workers Know if it's Viable The World Health Organization called the decision to use the sticker a first. It will change colors when exposed to heat to signal if it is safe for use. "This afternoon, WHO gave emergency use listing to sign off on Beijing's COVID-19 vaccine, making it the sixth vaccine to receive WHO validation for safety, efficacy and quality," Tedros Adhahom Ghebreysus, the WHO's director-general, told reporters Friday, the Associated Press reported.For more reporting from the Associated Press, see below. © Darko Vojinovic/AP Photo In this Tuesday, Jan.

Covax is co-led by the World Health Organization ( WHO ), the Gavi vaccine alliance and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI). "We are very pleased to sign this new agreement with Moderna , giving Covax facility participants access to yet another highly efficacious vaccine," said Gavi chief executive Seth Berkley. "Expanding and having a diverse portfolio has always been a core goal for Covax , and to remain adaptable in the face of this continually evolving pandemic—including the rising threat posed by new variants." The deal also contains options for potential access to future versions

Welcome to Monday's Overnight Health Care . President Biden has a new timeline for vaccinating everyone who wants to be, and his administration is also going to resume coronavirus briefings with health officials. Moderna is testing a booster shot just in case, while Merck is ending its vaccine President Biden said he thinks any American who wants a COVID-19 vaccine should be able to get one by the spring. “I think we’ll be able to do that this spring,” Biden said in a press conference with reporters. “It’s going to be a logistical challenge that exceeds anything we’ve ever tried in this country

But while the move will help with global access, the vaccines won't be delivered until the second half of the year. That means the short- and even medium-term supply issues won't be solved by the sale.

What's COVAX? Gavi co-leads, along with the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations and the World Health Organization (WHO), the COVAX program, which aims to give lower-income nations access to shots by 2022. Covax aims to distribute up to 2 billion doses this year, with a goal of reaching 20 percent of the population in participating countries. To date, it has delivered 49 million doses.

The COVAX program hit a roadblock in recent weeks when India outlawed exports of COVID-19 vaccines as the nation deals with rapidly rising case and death numbers. India hosts the world's largest vaccine manufacturer and has been a main supplier of AstraZeneca doses.

Follows: Moderna's pledge comes three days after the WHO authorized the company's vaccine for emergency use - the fifth vaccine to get such approval.

Mexico metro overpass collapses, killing 23 and injuring dozens

  Mexico metro overpass collapses, killing 23 and injuring dozens Top of The World: A section of a subway overpass of the Mexico City metro collapsed late Monday night, sending two cars of a passenger train onto traffic. And, US President Joe Biden signed an emergency presidential determination formally raising the country's cap on refugee admissions from 15,000 to 62,500 this year. Also, COVAX is getting a boost from US biotechnology company Moderna.Mexico City's subway cars lay at an angle after a section of Line 12 of the subway collapsed, May 4, 2021.

Geneva: Moderna will supply 34 million doses of its COVID-19 vaccine this year and Sweden has donated 1 million AstraZeneca shots to the global COVAX programme, a small boost as it struggles to get stocks to inoculate the world's poorest people. The advance purchase contract agreed with But COVAX has also been hit by supply problems for COVID-19 vaccines, notably the AstraZeneca shot made in India, where authorities have restricted exports because of its fast-growing epidemic. Moderna said in a statement the doses would be offered at its "lowest tiered price" without disclosing further

healthcare |03 May, 2021. COVAX gets boost from Moderna deal, Sweden's donation of COVID-19 vaccines -GAVI. COVAX hopes to have 2bln doses available by the end of 2021. A nurse prepares to administer the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine under the COVAX scheme against the coronavirus The agreement follows the U.S. drugmaker's shot being approved for emergency use listing by the WHO on Friday, a prerequisite for COVAX eligibility. GAVI runs the COVAX vaccine sharing facility with the World Health Organization. The Swedish donation is the second by a European Union member after

Read more here.

FDA set to authorize Pfizer vaccine for those aged 12 to 15

The Food and Drug Administration is poised to authorize Pfizer and BioNTech's coronavirus vaccine for adolescents as young as age 12 by early next week, the New York Times reported, though a decision could be made as early as later this week.

The highly anticipated decision would be a major step towards ensuring middle and high schools can operate for full in-person learning next fall, and would be a major boon to parents concerned about the safety of summer activities.

Vaccinating children of all ages will also be crucial to stopping the pandemic

But children broadly have a much lower risk of severe COVID than adults, so an authorization could bring up a host of ethical questions, especially when much of the rest of the world is struggling with vaccine supply.

Read more here.

COVID-19 on Capitol Hill: Vaccine hesitancy among lawmakers slows return to normalcy

Lawmakers, like the rest of the country, are all eligible for the coronavirus vaccine. But President Biden's speech to Congress last week looked like he was addressing a group that hadn't gotten a single shot.

Moderna's founder says mRNA can treat a wide range of diseases

  Moderna's founder says mRNA can treat a wide range of diseases Derrick Rossi, the founder of Moderna, says vaccines are just the beginning of mRNA therapeutics.In 2008, he began researching messenger RNA (mRNA), building on the long-ignored work of Hungarian researcher Katalin Karikó and Drew Weissman, an immunologist at the University of Pennsylvania. In 2010, his discovery that modified mRNA, the molecule that gives DNA instructions on how to behave, could be inserted into cells to produce proteins opened up a world of possibilities for the medical uses of mRNA technology.

With a crowd a fraction of its usual size - and those present all socially distancing and wearing masks - the speech underscored how life on Capitol Hill has been slow to return to normal and how difficult it is to persuade holdouts to get immunized.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) estimated a day after the address that about 75 percent of House members have been vaccinated, a figure unchanged since March. Until more members get vaccinated, Pelosi said, the House won't return to pre-pandemic operations.

Some lawmakers in both parties initially expressed discomfort in December with getting vaccinated before the shots were more widely available to the public. But now that all U.S. adults are eligible, the only known holdouts are those skeptical of the need.

At the same time, numerous Republicans have been pushing Democratic leaders in recent weeks to end the pandemic restrictions in the Capitol, even though some of them aren't taking the steps recommended by public health experts to reach that point.

Among the holdouts: Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Ky.) said he isn't planning to get his vaccine after previously testing positive for the virus last year. Sens. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) and Rand Paul (R-Ky.) have voiced similar rationales for not getting vaccinated after positive tests in 2020.

#VAXLive: Emmanuel Macron responds to Selena Gomez and announces sending vaccines to Africa

 #VAXLive: Emmanuel Macron responds to Selena Gomez and announces sending vaccines to Africa © provided by Le Parisien Le Parisien after the call of the star, comes the announcement of the president. This Sunday, Emmanuel Macron announced the sending of vaccine doses against Cvid-19 in Africa. A statement that occurs the day after a singer Selena Gomez calling for several leaders to engage in immunization for the poorest. "France has just sent the first doses intended for Covax.

The CDC recommends that people who previously tested positive for COVID-19 still get vaccinated as soon as they can.

Read more here.

Good news: Ebola outbreak ends in Congo

A small flare-up of the Ebola virus has been contained in an eastern province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), international health officials said Monday.

The 12th known Ebola epidemic in the DRC led to 12 infections and six deaths in the North Kivu Province. But no new cases have been recorded in the last 42 days, designating the epidemic's official end.

The first case in this outbreak occurred in a woman whose husband survived Ebola in 2018 after scientists learned the virus stayed in the husband's system.

Genetic sequencing showed the virus was linked to a previous outbreak that tore through North Kivu and a neighboring province beginning in 2018. That outbreak killed more than 2,000 people in what became the second-largest Ebola epidemic in modern history.

The CDC said in a statement it had helped the Ministry of Health establish a mobile genetic sequencing lab in Goma to help understand more about the ability of the virus to survive for long periods of time even in people who have recovered.

Read more here.

Cities, states experiment with incentives for vaccinations

States and cities are experimenting with offering incentives and privileges for residents to get vaccinated for COVID-19 as concerns have mounted over the slowdown in vaccinations across the U.S.

Officials are turning to initiatives such as giving vaccine recipients payments through savings bonds, free drinks or gift cards to motivate Americans to get their COVID-19 shot.

The Latest: Pakistan receives 1st vaccines through COVAX

  The Latest: Pakistan receives 1st vaccines through COVAX ISLAMABAD— Pakistan on Saturday received its first supply of COVID-19 vaccines through the U.N.-backed COVAX initiative, over 1.2 million doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. The prime minister’s special aide on health, Dr. Faisal Sultan, asked people over age 40 to register for shots and said the Pakistani government would soon be able to expand its immunization program to other age groups. A statement issued by Pakistan's National CommandThe prime minister’s special aide on health, Dr. Faisal Sultan, asked people over age 40 to register for shots and said the Pakistani government would soon be able to expand its immunization program to other age groups.

West Virginia committed last week to giving those aged 16 to 35 who get the vaccine $100 in savings bonds, Connecticut plans to offer vaccine recipients one free drink with purchase of food and Detroit launched on Monday its program giving $50 prepaid debit cards to anyone who drives another person to get their vaccination, as long as they preregister.

These state and local governments are taking a page out of some businesses' playbooks, including Krispy Kreme, which offers a free doughnut every day of 2021 to Americans who prove they got their shot.

Why this matters: Public health and psychology experts said these programs have the potential to bring in more people willing to get the vaccine and that incentives are worth a try to close the country's gap in vaccinations.

The push for incentives comes as the average number of vaccines administered daily in the U.S. has been declining in recent days, which experts have attributed to a waning demand for vaccines after enthusiastic recipients have already gotten their shots.

Read more here.

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More than a year into the pandemic, we're still figuring out what risks we're willing to take (The Washington Post)

State by state

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