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Politics Mitch McConnell Signals Smaller Infrastructure Deal Within Reach Ahead of GOP Talks With Joe Biden

06:50  04 may  2021
06:50  04 may  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Fact check: Biden's speech had an estimated 26.9 million viewers

  Fact check: Biden's speech had an estimated 26.9 million viewers The president’s first address to Congress had 26.9 million viewers, not 11.6 million as claimed in a social media post.An April 29 Facebook post from James T. Harris, a conservative radio host and social media personality, lists television ratings for five past presidential addresses — four from former President Donald Trump and one from Biden. The post says Biden’s address to Congress had only 11.6 million viewers, compared to 37.2 million viewers for Trump’s 2020 State of the Union speech.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell drew a 0 billion red line for an infrastructure and jobs plan on Monday, an amount less than a fifth of the trillion in economic spending plans that President Joe Biden has unveiled. "We're open to doing a roughly 0 billion package, which deals with what all of us "We're happy to look for traditional infrastructure pay-fors, which means the users participate." McConnell 's comments underscore the wide bridge between Republicans and Democrats on their economic priorities. Their ability to cut a deal will depend whether they can agree on methods to

(AP) — Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell , R-Ky., said Monday that Republicans are willing to spend up to 0 billion on infrastructure , far less than President Joe Biden is seeking, even as he ruled out supporting a higher corporate tax rate to pay for it. With Democrats holding only slim majorities in the House and Senate, Biden and congressional leaders will soon have to decide how they plan to muscle his priority legislation into law. Biden has been reaching out to Republicans and seeking their input, even as some in his party agitate to move ahead without GOP support.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on Monday signaled to Democrats that a smaller infrastructure deal is within reach ahead of expected White House negotiations with Republicans this week.

a man standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on Monday signaled that a smaller infrastructure deal is possible ahead of GOP negotiations with Joe Biden. © Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on Monday signaled that a smaller infrastructure deal is possible ahead of GOP negotiations with Joe Biden.

In a press conference in Kentucky, McConnell made clear that Republicans wouldn't support the high cost of President Joe Biden's $4.1 trillion sweeping infrastructure proposal and floated a smaller package.

"I think it's worth talking about but I don't think there will be any Republican support—none, zero—for the $4.1 trillion grab bag which has infrastructure in it but a whole lot of other stuff," the senator said.

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- Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell , R-Ky., said Monday that Republicans are willing to spend up to 0 billion on infrastructure , far less than President Joe Biden is seeking, even as he ruled out supporting a higher corporate tax rate to pay for it. With Democrats holding only slim majorities in the House and Senate, Biden and congressional leaders will soon have to decide how they plan to muscle his priority legislation into law. Biden has been reaching out to Republicans and seeking their input, even as some in his party agitate to move ahead without GOP support.

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden and Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell toughened their positions Monday over the tax increases for millionaires and corporations that Biden has proposed to fund his sweeping infrastructure and education plans. McConnell 's insistence on protecting the 2017 tax cuts effectively pours cold water on the best chance that the White House and congressional Republicans had to reach a deal on at least one part of Biden 's sweeping domestic agenda.

He added: "We're open to doing a roughly $600 billion package which deals with what all of us agree is infrastructure. If it's going to be about infrastructure, let's make it about infrastructure."

Biden's plan is divided into two parts: a $1.8 trillion American Families Plan that would allocate funds for education and tax cuts for families, and a $2.3 trillion American Jobs Plan that would boost infrastructure, create high-paying jobs to facilitate innovation, and strengthen manufacturing.

McConnell's $600 billion is far less than the $2.3 trillion that Biden is seeking for infrastructure, but his remarks were the strongest signal yet that a smaller bipartisan deal could be reached.

On April 22, a group of Republicans proposed a $568 billion counteroffer to Biden's $2.3 trillion American Jobs Plan as the party stepped toward bipartisan negotiations. They called their offer a good faith effort, but the package fell between the $600-$800 billion that members of the GOP floated earlier that week.

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) says President Joe Biden can expect "zero" Senate Republicans to sign on to the administration's trillion behemoth of an infrastructure package, saying it costs too much and has "a whole lot of other stuff" in it beyond its purported purpose. There is a sense of urgency among Biden and his allies, who feel they have a limited window to pass any legislation before members start focusing on the midterm elections, in which Democrats could lose one or both chambers of Congress. If Democrats all rally behind the White House's plan, the package

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) says he has 50 votes against President Biden ’s ambitious infrastructure and family plans. Slamming Biden ’s sprawling plans as non-starters, the powerful GOP leader insists he can keep the Republicans in line to oppose both plans, which he derides as a smorgasbord of liberal priorities and giveaways to pro-Democratic special interests. McConnell was derisively referring to Biden ’s .3 trillion infrastructure plan and a .8 trillion plan to help families with free child care, community college and a permanent expansion of the child tax credit.

Asked if the GOP proposal was a "hard cap" on Monday, McConnell said it wasn't a red line.

"If it's going to be about infrastructure, let's make it about infrastructure. And I think there's some sentiment on the Democratic side for splitting it off," he added.

Biden wants to fund his plan by raising taxes on capital gains and wealthy individuals, but McConnell strongly warned that "revisiting the 2017 tax bill" was a non-starter. "We're not willing to pay for it by undoing the 2017 bill," he said.

On Sunday, Independent Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont told NBC "the very rich and large corporations should start paying their fair share of taxes to help us rebuild America and create the jobs that we need."

The Republican leader's remarks comes ahead of an expected meeting between the Biden administration and Republicans. In a recent interview on CBS, White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain said that Biden has invited Republicans, including West Virginia Senator Shelley Moore Capito, a lead GOP negotiator, to a meeting this week, according to the Wall Street Journal.

While Trump calls him 'gutless,' Mitch McConnell says focus is 100% on 'stopping' Biden

  While Trump calls him 'gutless,' Mitch McConnell says focus is 100% on 'stopping' Biden In Georgetown, Sen. McConnell refused to talk about Rep. Liz Cheney or many Republicans' baseless beliefs about the validity of the 2020 election.He refused to address either topic during a short press conference in Georgetown, Kentucky, on Wednesday and instead stressed his opposition to President Joe Biden.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is hitting the brakes on emerging COVID-19 aid package from a bipartisan group of lawmakers, saying Republican senators won’t support 0 billion in state and local funds as part of a potential trade-off in the deal . McConnell ’s office did not immediately respond for a request for comment. The hardened stance from McConnell , who does not appear to have the votes from Republicans for a far- reaching compromise, creates a new stalemate over the 0-billion-plus package, despite days of toiling by a bipartisan group of lawmakers toward a deal .

Mitch McConnell turned to his friend Joe Biden for a lifeline. Then-Vice President Joe Biden addresses the press on Capitol Hill after a Senate Democratic caucus meeting about the fiscal cliff The Last Time He Tried, Mitch McConnell Picked His Pockets Badly. In 2012, the GOP was in trouble.

"We're going to work with Republicans. We're going to find common ground," Klain said.

Centrist Republican Senator Susan Collins of Maine said Biden should make the next offer in negotiations to reach a deal.

On Sunday, Biden senior adviser Anita Dunn told CNN that Biden's open to comprise. "He wants to move this package forward in a bipartisan way, if that's possible," she said. "His red line if inaction, that we cannot afford not to make these investments in America's economy."

Democrats, who narrowly control both chambers of Congress, could use the budget process called reconciliation to pass at least a significant portion of Biden's overall bill without GOP support.

However, centrist Democratic Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia has signaled that he supports a bipartisan deal and could be against using reconciliation.

Newsweek reached out to the White House for comment. This story will be updated with any response.

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President Biden's first 100 days: What he's gotten done .
President Joe Biden has moved fast since his January 20 swearing-in, signing a $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill into law less than two months into his term and issuing more executive orders so far than his three predecessors. © Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images A first-grader works on an English exercise on the first day of class in Los Angeles on April 13, 2021. Those efforts have paid off, with the administration reaching the milestones of 200 million coronavirus shots delivered and vaccine eligibility opened to everyone 16 and over before Biden's 100th day in office.

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