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Politics Three California, Four New York House Seats Among Those GOP Aiming to Flip for 2022

17:50  04 may  2021
17:50  04 may  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Census reapportionment likely helps GOP, but only slightly

  Census reapportionment likely helps GOP, but only slightly Changes in how many congressional representatives each state gets for 2022 and beyond appear to benefit Republicans — but only a little. © Provided by Washington Examiner Redistricting fights to come will be much more influential in determining which party has an edge in “safe” congressional districts. The Census Bureau revealed on Monday that as a result of the 2020 counting of the population, reapportionment of the 435 House seats means losses of districts in mostly Democratic-leaning states and gains in mostly Republican-leaning states.

The Republican Party is going on the offensive for 2022 as it aims to reclaim power on Capitol Hill.

a large building: The presidential inaugural platform is under construction in front of the U.S. Capitol as part of the West Front lawn is closed to the public November 9, 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. On Tuesday, the National Republican Congressional Committee released a list of 10 additional seats the party will look to flip from blue to red in the upcoming election cycle. © Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images The presidential inaugural platform is under construction in front of the U.S. Capitol as part of the West Front lawn is closed to the public November 9, 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. On Tuesday, the National Republican Congressional Committee released a list of 10 additional seats the party will look to flip from blue to red in the upcoming election cycle.

On Tuesday, the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) released a list of 10 additional seats the party is looking to flip from blue to red in the upcoming election cycle. Three of the targets are in California, four are in New York, and the others are in Illinois, Pennsylvania and Michigan.

At the Races: It’s (still) Trump’s party

  At the Races: It’s (still) Trump’s party Welcome to At the Races! Each week we’ll bring you news and analysis from the CQ Roll Call campaign team. Know someone who’d like to get this newsletter? They can subscribe here. By Bridget Bowman, Stephanie Akin and Kate Ackley If you still need proof of former President Donald Trump’s stranglehold on the Republican Party, […] The post At the Races: It’s (still) Trump’s party appeared first on Roll Call.

"Republicans are on offense all across the country," NRCC Chairman Tom Emmer said in a statement. "Every House Democrat is facing an uphill battle having to defend their toxic socialist agenda that prioritizes trillion-dollar tax hikes on the middle class, opens our borders, closes our schools and defunds the police."

With about 18 months until the midterms, the GOP's list of seats to flip has grown to over 50.

The Republican Party was on the verge of an identity crisis early this year after being pushed out of power in the White House and Congress. The GOP lost control of the House of Representatives in the 2018 midterms, as well as the White House and the Senate in 2020, prompting some members to attempt to shift the party in a new direction after Donald Trump's presidency.

US marks slowest population growth since the Depression

  US marks slowest population growth since the Depression WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. population growth has slowed to the lowest rate since the Great Depression, the Census Bureau said, as Americans continued their march to the South and West and one-time engines of growth, New York and California, lost political influence. Altogether, the U.S. population rose to 331,449,281 last year, the Census Bureau said Monday, a 7.4% increase that was the second slowest ever. Experts say that paltry pace reflects the combination of an aging population, slowing immigration and the scars of the Great Recession more than a decade ago, which led many young adults to delay marriage and families.

Still, the party exceeded expectations in the 2020 elections by netting 11 seats in the House and flipping more than a dozen seats from blue to red. Democrats will now have to defend a narrow 222-214 majority in the lower chamber next year.

Still one of the party's most prominent figures, Trump has already gotten involved in the 2022 midterms by teaming up with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and issuing endorsements for more than a dozen candidates for federal and statewide offices.

On Monday, Trump credited himself with boosting Republicans in a special election in Texas's 6th Congressional district. The GOP shut Democrats out of the race by advancing two Republicans to a runoff, which Trump called a "very big win."

The former president's Save America PAC reportedly has a $85 million war chest heading into next year's races. Filings with the Federal Election Commission show the committee ended 2020 with $31 million in cash on hand.

Reapportionment's hidden surprises for 2022

  Reapportionment's hidden surprises for 2022 Predicting reapportionment’s consequences is impossible without taking into account the convoluted landscape of redistricting. Every state has its own process for redrawing lines. An accurate tally requires close examination in nerdy detail. Seven seats changed hands, the smallest shift since 1920, when rural legislators fearful of losing power stopped reapportionment from happening entirely. The resulting changes to the House of Representatives, and the corresponding Electoral College votes, are therefore small by historical standards.

The GOP will also have some advantages heading into 2022, including census reapportionment numbers and redrawing of congressional maps. According to The Cook Political Report, a nonpartisan election forecaster, the GOP could gain eight House seats through the redrawing of maps alone.

"We're going to get the majority back. We're five seats away," McCarthy pledged during an appearance at the Conservative Political Action Conference earlier this year. "I would bet my house. My personal house. Don't tell my wife, but I will bet it."

Newsweek has reached out to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee for a response to the NRCC's 2022 targets but did not receive a response before publication.

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Democrats appear unfazed after Texas shutout .
House Democrats hoping to project strength going into the 2022 midterms got two doses of bad news last week, with the high-profile retirement of Illinois Rep. Cheri Bustos followed by the weekend shutout of all Democratic candidates from the runoff in the competitive special election in Texas’ 6th District. The twin developments offered an opening […] The post Democrats appear unfazed after Texas shutout appeared first on Roll Call.

usr: 1
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