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Politics GOP pressures Garland on border

23:10  04 may  2021
23:10  04 may  2021 Source:   politico.com

Rep. Henry Cuellar, one of Biden's harshest critics on the migrant surge, is urging White House to listen to border towns

  Rep. Henry Cuellar, one of Biden's harshest critics on the migrant surge, is urging White House to listen to border towns Texas Democratic Rep. Henry Cuellar has become an outspoken, critical voice on immigration as Biden grapples with migrants coming to the border.The 65-year-old congressman, donning a tan button-down shirt and matching pants, lamented about the issues he’s seen in his community as an increased number of migrant children, families and adults make their way to the U.S.-Mexico border. American teenagers are being recruited by cartels to help smuggle people into the United States, ranch property is being destroyed, and now migrants are replacing drugs as the newest and most valuable commodity to smuggle into the country, he said.

Attorney General Merrick Garland faced criticism from Republicans over the Biden administration’s immigration and policing policies on Tuesday as he navigated his first Capitol Hill appearance since taking his new post in March.

Merrick Garland wearing a suit and tie: Attorney General Merrick Garland told a House Appropriations subcommittee that the administration is proposing a 21 percent increase to funding for immigration courts, to help clear a 1.3 million-case backlog that the Trump administration began to shrink before it ballooned due to closures and slowdowns related to the coronavirus pandemic. © AP Photo/Andrew Harnik Attorney General Merrick Garland told a House Appropriations subcommittee that the administration is proposing a 21 percent increase to funding for immigration courts, to help clear a 1.3 million-case backlog that the Trump administration began to shrink before it ballooned due to closures and slowdowns related to the coronavirus pandemic.

However, during a two-hour House hearing, the former judge managed to completely escape questioning on some of his department’s most attention-grabbing work. Topics not raised in the hearing included the investigation into the storming of the Capitol on Jan. 6 and a separate foreign-agent probe that led the FBI to carry out search warrants last week against former President Donald Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani.

Montana tribe gifts vaccines to neighbors across the border

  Montana tribe gifts vaccines to neighbors across the border BABB, Mont. (AP) — On a cloudy spring day, hundreds lined up in their cars on the Canadian side of the border crossing that separates Alberta and Montana. They had driven for hours and camped out in their vehicles in hopes of receiving the season’s hottest commodity — a COVID-19 vaccine — from a Native American tribe that was giving out its excess doses. The Blackfeet tribe in northern Montana provided about 1,000 surplus vaccines last month to its First Nations relatives and others from across the border, in an illustration of the disparity in speed at which the United States and Canada are distributing doses. While more than 30% of adults in the U.S.

Republicans instead zeroed in on how the Justice Department is responding to increases in Central American immigrants, often families, seeking to cross the U.S. border with Mexico.

“It is a huge challenge and we basically have an invasion taking place in the southern border,” Rep. Steve Palazzo (R-Miss.) said. “I know we got to handle this in a humanitarian way, and I am all for that. And we are also a nation of law and order and, without that, we are creating chaos.”

Garland told a House Appropriations subcommittee that the administration is proposing a 21 percent increase to funding for immigration courts, to help clear a 1.3 million-case backlog that the Trump administration began to shrink before it ballooned due to closures and slowdowns related to the coronavirus pandemic.

With civil rights charges, Justice Dept. signals priorities

  With civil rights charges, Justice Dept. signals priorities The Justice Department is sending a strong message about its priorities these days. In just over the past two weeks, it has opened investigations of police in Louisville, Kentucky, and Minneapolis. In just over the past two weeks, it has opened investigations of police in Louisville, Kentucky, and Minneapolis. Federal prosecutors have charged four former Minneapolis police officers with civil rights violations in George Floyd's death, and accused three men of hate crimes in the death of Ahmaud Arbery in Georgia. In both criminal cases, authorities moved forward with federal charges before most of the defendants have gone to state trial.

“I’m very concerned about the backlog. I think it obviously is not working for the people who are in the system and not working for the government,” the attorney general said.

Garland emphasized that frontline border enforcement is handled by the Department of Homeland Security. “They have the primary responsibility at the border … We have a large number of U.S. attorneys at the border that prosecute the cases that are brought to them.”

One Democrat, Rep. Ed Case of Hawaii, also pressed Garland on immigration issues. Case said delays in the immigration court process were encouraging human traffickers to send more foreigners into the U.S. illegally.

“It seems pretty obvious that the delay in adjudication, especially on the asylum side, is directly manipulated by those that are engaged in human trafficking,” Case said.

Garland said Biden’s budget proposal to add 100 immigration judges along with support staff should help cut the backlog.

The Model for Fixing the DOJ

  The Model for Fixing the DOJ Joe Biden has inherited a department plagued by scandal, just as Gerald Ford did in 1974.Ford managed to make progress on all of these problems in just two and a half years. By the end of his presidency, he had laid the groundwork for a historic improvement in both the appearance and the reality of nonpartisanship and professionalism at Justice. Jimmy Carter’s one-term presidency continued the work. The 1970s ended in a much better place than they had begun, with solidly entrenched laws, rules, and norms that kept the Department of Justice largely—not entirely, but largely—free from partisanship and serious misconduct for decades.

“It’s very hard to project what the reduction will be, but with this kind of many-pronged attack on the problem, the impact should be very substantial,” the attorney general said. However, he ignored a question from Case about whether asylum laws needed to be overhauled — something Garland’s Trump administration predecessors strongly urged.

Garland also gave a confusing answer on gun buybacks, referring to the program as a way to take guns from people ineligible to own them because of felony convictions. The Biden administration has framed the effort as a broader, voluntary effort to try to reduce the number of assault-style weapons on the streets.

Republicans also questioned changes the Biden administration is making to civil rights programs, including budget increases for mediators at the Community Relations Service and a return to broad pattern-and-practice investigations of police departments involved in shootings of Black Americans.

Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-Ala.) called the recent moves a return to “heavy-handed and constitutionally troubling” policies of the Obama administration. He also raised doubts about new funding for what he termed “sensitivity training programs” for police and said the shifts in funding “likely come at the expense of more important national priorities.”

DOJ to Open Probe Into Louisville Police Roughly a Year After Death of Breonna Taylor

  DOJ to Open Probe Into Louisville Police Roughly a Year After Death of Breonna Taylor Attorney General Merrick Garland announced a ‘pattern and practice’ investigation into the Louisville Metro Police Department – the second such probe announced by the government in a week.It's the second such investigation into law enforcement announced in the past week. Garland said Wednesday that the agency was opening a probe into the Minneapolis Police Department, less than a day after ex-Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was convicted of murdering George Floyd, a Black man, last May.

“It’s important to know or evaluate any trade-offs that are being made. Your budget summary only tells one side of the story,” he told Garland.

The only mention of the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol came during the opening remarks of the subcommittee chairman, Rep. Matt Cartwright (D-Pa.), but no one pressed Garland on the status of the sprawling probe.

Aderholt did press Garland on another violent episode: the 2017 shooting at a congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Va. The Alabama Republican asked the attorney general to explore and reverse a decision by the FBI to classify the shooting as a suicide-by-cop rather than domestic terrorism.

Aderholt faulted the response he got last week on the issue from a top FBI official, Jill Sanborn. Testifying before the same House panel, she appeared to defend the description of the effort but also said it would likely be called domestic terrorism under current practices.

“Unfortunately, I think the answer that I received was wholly unsatisfactory. As attorney general, are you able to right this obvious wrong?” Aderholt asked. “Many members of Congress could have lost their lives in that situation.”

Garland said he was aware of the controversy but had not yet been able to find out why the FBI changed its view on the incident.

"I don’t know enough about what the classification means at this point, but I promise I will raise this issue with the FBI,” the attorney general said.

How President Biden confronted racism and injustice in his first 100 days .
President Biden has promised to address inequities in health care, criminal justice, housing, voting, pay and more.He described the trauma many of the nation’s Black and brown people experience. They worry, he said, that encounters with the police could turn deadly, that their children aren’t safe going to the grocery store, driving down the street, playing in the park or even sleeping at home.

usr: 1
This is interesting!