•   
  •   
  •   

Politics 5 things to know for May 12: Coronavirus, Congress, Gaza, pipeline hack, voting

13:51  12 may  2021
13:51  12 may  2021 Source:   cnn.com

Oil pipeline builder agrees to halt eminent domain lawsuits

  Oil pipeline builder agrees to halt eminent domain lawsuits MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — A company seeking to build a disputed oil pipeline over an aquifer that provides drinking water to 1 million people agreed verbally Tuesday to stop pursuing lawsuits against Tennessee property owners who refused to sell access to their land for construction. Plains All American Pipeline spokesman Brad Leone said the company will put an agreement in writing with the Memphis City Council to set aside lawsuits filed against property owners fighting the Byhalia Connection pipeline. Leone spoke at a council committee meeting in which members discussed a proposed city law making it difficult for the pipeline to be approved and built.

About 37 million Americans are expected to travel for Memorial Day, a big boost from last year's record low. And a huge majority plans to drive -- not fly.

a group of people around each other: Family members look on as Jack Frilingos, 12, is inoculated with Pfizer's vaccine against coronavirus disease (COVID-19) after Georgia authorized the vaccine for ages over 12 years, at Dekalb Pediatric Center in Decatur, Georgia, U.S. May 11, 2021.  REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry © Chris Aluka Berry/Reuters Family members look on as Jack Frilingos, 12, is inoculated with Pfizer's vaccine against coronavirus disease (COVID-19) after Georgia authorized the vaccine for ages over 12 years, at Dekalb Pediatric Center in Decatur, Georgia, U.S. May 11, 2021. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry

Here's what you need to know to Get Up to Speed and On with Your Day.

(You can also get "5 Things You Need to Know Today" delivered to your inbox daily. Sign up here.)

What we know about the Colonial Pipeline ransomware cyberattack

  What we know about the Colonial Pipeline ransomware cyberattack What we know about the Colonial Pipeline cyberattack. The latest on who is behind it, how it could impact gas prices and more. Colonial Pipeline said on Saturday that it was the victim of a cyberattack involving ransomware and had "proactively" halted all pipeline operations as a result. The 5,500-mile pipeline system transports approximately 45% of all fuel consumed on the East Coast, according to its website, and runs from Texas to New Jersey.

1. Coronavirus

A CDC advisory panel is set to meet today to discuss whether to recommend use of Pfizer's Covid-19 vaccine in 12- to 15-year-olds. If it does, these vaccinations could begin swiftly (though some already have, after the FDA gave its authorization). A pediatrics group found nearly a quarter of new Covid-19 cases are in kids, so vaccinating them and getting vaccines approved for even younger groups, could be a big help. And remember that B.1.1.7 coronavirus variant first discovered in the UK that experts worried would take over in the US? It now accounts for 72% of coronavirus genetic sequences in the US. Meanwhile, the global pandemic death toll could be as high as 6.9 million, a study finds. That's more than double the reported total.

Overnight Energy: 5 takeaways from the Colonial Pipeline attack | Colonial aims to 'substantially' restore pipeline operations by end of week | Three questions about Biden's conservation goals

  Overnight Energy: 5 takeaways from the Colonial Pipeline attack | Colonial aims to 'substantially' restore pipeline operations by end of week | Three questions about Biden's conservation goals HAPPY MONDAY. Welcome to Overnight Energy, your source for the day's energy and environment news.Please send tips and comments to Rachel Frazin at rfrazin@thehill.com . Follow her on Twitter: @RachelFrazin . Reach Zack Budryk at zbudryk@thehill.com or follow him on Twitter: @BudrykZack . Signup for our newsletter and others HERE. Today it's pipelines all the way down as we examine what you need to know about the cyberattack that's haltedToday it's pipelines all the way down as we examine what you need to know about the cyberattack that's halted operations at a pipeline serving 45 percent of people on the East Coast, plus a look at President Biden's conservation plan.

The angler fish washed ashore at the Crystal Cove State Park in California. © Crystal Cove State Park The angler fish washed ashore at the Crystal Cove State Park in California.

2. Congress

Rep. Liz Cheney, the No. 3 House Republican, is expected to be ousted from her position as chair of the House GOP conference when the body meets today to vote on her fate. Cheney has been a vocal critic of former President Trump and his supporters, and has called out fellow Republicans for supporting his false claim that the 2020 election was somehow stolen from him. Cheney gave a defiant speech last night on the House floor, shaming colleagues who will vote to strip her of her post and calling Trump's hold on the GOP "a threat America has never seen before." Many House GOP members are eager to move on from talking about things like the Capitol riot and want to consolidate their party's message in order to try to take back the House in the midterm elections.

3. Gaza

At least 35 people are dead in Gaza after the latest exchange of airstrikes between Israeli and Palestinian forces last night. Palestinian militants in Gaza fired hundreds of rockets into Israel, which responded with ramped up airstrikes on the coastal enclave, as unrest has spread to cities and towns beyond Jerusalem. Israel declared a state of emergency in the central city of Lod and called up 5,000 reserve troops to active duty to enhance its operation in Gaza. The US and the European Union have both called for a de-escalation of violence, while several countries in the Middle East, including Turkey, have condemned the Israeli police response to tensions in Jerusalem. The UN denounced both the Israeli airstrikes and the Palestinian rocket shelling.

Gaza militants, children among 24 dead as Israel hits Hamas

  Gaza militants, children among 24 dead as Israel hits Hamas The escalation in the conflict was sparked by weeks of tensions in contested Jerusalem. © Khalil Hamra/AP Photo Flares by Israeli forces light up the sky of eastern Gaza Strip on May 11. Since sundown Monday when the cross-border attacks began, 24 Palestinians — including nine children — were killed in Gaza, most by airstrikes, Gaza health officials said. The Israeli military said 15 of the dead were militants. During the same period, Gaza militants fired more than 250 rockets toward Israel, injuring six Israeli civilians in a direct hit on an apartment building.

4. Pipeline hack

States including Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia and Florida have declared emergencies as gas demand soars due to the ongoing Colonial Pipeline crisis. The company is still working to get its system fully operational again following a security hack, and the shutdown has caused serious shortages up and down the East Coast. Some gas stations are fully out of fuel, while others have been set upon by snaking lines of cars. Federal and state leaders have warned businesses against price gouging. Federal officials also say they are considering more ways to ease fuel delivery, like shipping fuel to nearby coastal ports. Even American Airlines has had to add stops on two long-range flights out of Charlotte because of the disruption.

5. Voting

A sweeping Democratic-backed elections and campaign finance overhaul faced a clash in the Senate Rules Committee, making it clear that Republican opposition to the voting rights bill isn't flagging anytime soon. The panel was deadlocked on passing the bill, known as the For the People Act. Democrats are hoping to still move it forward as a way to mitigate Republican state-level efforts to restrict voting access. One such effort just passed in Arizona, where Gov. Doug Ducey signed into law a controversial bill that could remove tens of thousands of voters from the state's early mail-in voting list, which allows a voter to automatically get a ballot by mail for every election.

Colonial Pipeline shutdown: Expect fuel shortages to go away by Memorial Day, expert says

  Colonial Pipeline shutdown: Expect fuel shortages to go away by Memorial Day, expert says Colonial Pipeline will likely resume over the next two days, but consumers may have to wait longer in line, experts say.The shut-off of the pipeline, the primary fuel conduit serving the East Coast, spurred many people on the east coast and in the southeast into panic-buying — with some hoarding gas — and drained supplies at thousands of gas stations. Average gas prices are above $3, and some stations in the Southeast are running out or low on fuel.

BREAKFAST BROWSE

2 New York mayoral candidates guessed a house in Brooklyn costs ... $100K or less

It's OK to laugh at how wrong they are ... or cry.

One reason there's a chicken shortage? Disappointing roosters

"Well, THAT's rude." -- the roosters, probably

A monstrous-looking fish normally found thousands of feet deep in the ocean washed up on a California beach

Jump-scare warning: It looks exactly like you'd think a monstrous fish normally found thousands of feet deep in the ocean would look.

How to cautiously hug in the pandemic, now that it's allowed in the UK

Also good advice for those whose love language is not physical touch.

Voyager spacecraft detects 'persistent hum' beyond our solar system

Interstellar beings, if you're trying to contact us, we're kind of sorting through our own problems right now.

TODAY'S NUMBER

178,000

That's how many migrants were encountered at the southern US border in April. That's the highest one-month total in two decades. An overwhelming majority -- 110,000 -- were single adults subject to quick expulsion to Mexico or their home countries under a Trump-era pandemic emergency rule.

TODAY'S QUOTE

"We will move fairly quickly on that matter to go before the court to make our arguments to get the videos released."

Harry Daniels, an attorney for the family of Andrew Brown Jr., who was fatally shot last month by police in North Carolina. Video footage of the shooting has been in debate in the case, and after viewing it, Brown's family says it's recommitted to pursuing its release.

TODAY'S WEATHER

Check your local forecast here>>>

AND FINALLY

You can learn a lot of things from the flowers

It's been raining constantly here in Georgia. Hopefully it will make the flowers bloom as beautifully as they do in this time lapse. (Click here to view.)

Calls mount for Gaza-Israel cease-fire, greater US efforts .
The U.N. Security Council and Muslim nations convened emergency meetings Sunday to demand a stop to civilian bloodshed as Israeli warplanes carried out the deadliest single attacks in nearly a week of unrelenting Hamas rocket barrages and Israeli airstrikes. President Joe Biden gave no signs of pressuring Israel to agree to an immediate cease-fire despite new calls from some Democrats for the Biden administration to get more involved. His ambassador to the United Nations, Linda Thomas-Greenfield, told an emergency high-level meeting of the Security Council that the United States was “working tirelessly through diplomatic channels" to stop the fighting.

usr: 4
This is interesting!