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Politics ‘The president is committed to codifying Roe’: White House backs abortion rights as Supreme Court takes on controversial case

22:40  17 may  2021
22:40  17 may  2021 Source:   news.yahoo.com

Assaults on Roe v Wade increasing

  Assaults on Roe v Wade increasing Last week alone, governors of seven states signed laws that restrict or defy abortion rights under Roe — ripe for the new conservative Supreme Court.Last week alone, governors of seven states signed laws that restrict or defy abortion rights under Roe. That could soon give the newly reshaped U.S. Supreme Court an opportunity to chip away at or even overturn it.

President Biden will continue to advocate for the rights established under Roe v. Wade regardless of what the Supreme Court decides on a case challenging a Mississippi law that ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

“[T]he president is committed to codifying Roe, regardless of the … outcome of this case,” White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said Wednesday, referring to Roe V. Wade, the historic ruling that legalized abortion on a national scale.

The Supreme Court announced Monday that it would consider the challenge to Mississippi law. Last year, the Supreme Court struck down a Louisiana law regulating abortion clinics with a 5-4 vote, but the balance has since changes with the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who was replaced by the Trump-appointed Amy Coney Barrett.

Opinion: This could be the case that takes down Roe v. Wade

  Opinion: This could be the case that takes down Roe v. Wade In agreeing to hear Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, the Supreme Court (and its new conservative supermajority) are gearing up to take a direct hit on the question of abortion and the future of Roe v. Wade, says law professor Mary Ziegler.Just a week ago, it seemed hard to imagine that the Supreme Court, with its conservative supermajority, was ready for a direct attack on Roe v. Wade. After all, the justices had been considering a Mississippi abortion case since September without saying a word.

Supporters of abortion rights fear that former President’s Trump’s reshaping of the courts through appointments of consevative judges — including the confirmation of two new conservative Supreme Court justices — puts the future of Roe v. Wade in danger.

text, whiteboard: Abortion rights demonstrators rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington in March 2020. (Jacquelyn Martin/AP) © Provided by Yahoo! News Abortion rights demonstrators rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington in March 2020. (Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

Biden campaigned on a promise to codify aborition right by passing federal legislation, though he likely lack the kind of bipartisan support needed to pass any bill that efforts protections similar to those provided by Roe v. Wade. Only two Republicans have voiced support, though their vote is not guaranteed, and the GOP has argued that passing federal legislation in this area would infringe on states’ rights.

Long-standing hopes and fears of Roe v. Wade reversal rekindled by new Supreme Court case

  Long-standing hopes and fears of Roe v. Wade reversal rekindled by new Supreme Court case For decades, conservatives have been chasing the goal of overturning Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court’s 1973 decision legalizing abortion, while liberals have been warning it could be as few as one Republican-appointed justice away from disappearing. © Provided by Washington Examiner Monday’s news that the justices, now split 6-3 in favor of nominees picked by Republican presidents, will hear a challenge to the Roe precedent in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization.

The White House in the meantime is currently attempting to push several other bills through Congress, all which need, and do not currently have, across the aisle support needed to guarantee they will pass.

Psaki declined to comment specifically on the Supreme Court’s decision to hear the case, but she did clarify that President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris would continue to fight for reproductive rights.

“Generally speaking, given this is a state law, I can say that over the last four years critical rights like the right to healthcare, the right to choose, have been under withering and extreme attack including through draconian state laws,” Psaki said. “And the president and the vice president are devoted to ensuring that every American has access to health care, including reproductive healthcare regardless of their income, zip code, race, health insurance status, or immigration status.”

Roe v. Wade: More states are expected to pass anti-abortion bills ahead of monumental Supreme Court case

  Roe v. Wade: More states are expected to pass anti-abortion bills ahead of monumental Supreme Court case The Supreme Court's move on Monday to take up a case concerning a Mississippi 15-week abortion ban will efforts to pass state-level abortion restrictions coming out of Republican-controlled legislatures, according to activists on both sides of the issue. © Kai Eiselein/The Moscow-Pullman Daily News/AP Protestors gather across from each other for rallies, Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, in Moscow, Idaho. "Why not?" Mallory Quigley, vice president of communications of the anti-abortion group Susan B.

The White House has previously reaffirmed the president’s commitment to supporting the rights established under Roe v. Wade — a promise Biden made repeatedly on the campaign trail. Just days following his inauguration, Biden said in a statement that reproductive health was under “relentless attack” during the Trump administration.

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Imagining a Post-Roe America .
The Supreme Court now has an opportunity to gut its 1973 abortion ruling. A savage landscape of inequality and culture war awaits.For those who favor greater reproductive rights, the Supreme Court’s decision to reconsider long-established precedent is deeply ominous. There won’t be a ruling until spring or summer of 2022, and it’s impossible to guess exactly what the new conservative majority might support. The Court could surprise us, as it did with the 1992 decision Planned Parenthood v.

usr: 1
This is interesting!