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Politics CNN's Barbara Starr's phone and email records secretly obtained by Trump DOJ

15:26  21 may  2021
15:26  21 may  2021 Source:   washingtonexaminer.com

Analysis of police misconduct record laws in all 50 states

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WHAT WERE THEY LOOKING FOR? CNN has revealed that some phone and email records of its longtime Pentagon correspondent Barbara Starr were obtained by the Justice Department under a secret court order during the last year of the Trump administration.

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CNN reported last night that government prosecutors had requested and obtained Starr’s phone and email records covering two months, between June 1, 2017, to July 31, 2017, a fact only disclosed to the cable network last week by the current administration.

Earlier this month, the Washington Post received a similar notification from the Justice Department that phone records were also obtained under a secret warrant for three of its reporters covering the period April 15, 2017, to July 31, 2017.

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“CNN strongly condemns the secret collection of any aspect of a journalist's correspondence, which is clearly protected by the First Amendment,” said CNN President Jeff Zucker in a statement. “We are asking for an immediate meeting with the Justice Department for an explanation."

BIDEN DOJ TO MEET WITH REPORTERS ABOUT TRUMP-ERA SECRET RECORDS SEIZURES

LOOKS LIKE A LEAK INVESTIGATION: In both the Washington Post and the CNN cases, prosecutors sought what’s called “non-content communications records,” which show times of phone calls and emails, along with who made them, but not the content of the communications.

CNN said its letter from the Justice Department listed phone numbers for Starr's Pentagon office, her home, and cellphones, as well as her work and personal email accounts.

CNN: Trump Justice Department seized reporter phone records

  CNN: Trump Justice Department seized reporter phone records WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration Justice Department secretly obtained the 2017 phone records of a CNN correspondent, the network said Thursday in revealing the existence of another apparent leak investigation. The revelation comes two weeks after The Washington Post disclosed that the Justice Department had last year seized phone records belonging to three current and former journalists. CNN said the Justice Department informed Pentagon correspondent Barbara Starr in a May 13 letter that it had obtained phone and email records covering a two-month period between June 1 and July 31, 2017.

Neither the Washington Post nor CNN was told the reason for the record seizure, but it appears the reporters are not suspected of any wrongdoing. “The targets of these investigations are not the news media recipients but rather those with access to the national defense information who provided it to the media and thus failed to protect it as lawfully required,” said Marc Raimondi, a Justice Department spokesman, after the Washington Post published its account earlier this month.

During the time in question, Starr reported on U.S. military options for North Korea that were being prepared for President Donald Trump, as well as stories on a possible chemical attack in Syria and the Pentagon’s policy on reporting combat deaths in Afghanistan.

The Washington Post reporting during those early months of Trump’s presidency focused on Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Trump DOJ seized CNN correspondent’s phone and email records

  Trump DOJ seized CNN correspondent’s phone and email records The news comes less than two weeks after The Washington Post reported the Justice Department secretly got three Post reporters’ phone records.CNN reported that the department informed Pentagon correspondent Barbara Starr last week about the move, in which prosecutors were able to get her email and phone records for two months in 2017. Those records included both her personal and work phones and emails.

NOT UNPRECEDENTED: The case has echoes of a 2006 leak investigation during the Bush administration in which phone calls made and received by New York Times reporter James Risen were allegedly tracked by the government in an effort to uncover his source for a story about U.S. efforts to sabotage Iran’s nuclear program.

During the Obama administration, Risen was subpoenaed to testify in the case of Jeffrey Sterling, a former CIA officer charged with leaking details about the operation in Iran. In addition, in 2011, the Justice Department secretly seized phone records from the Associated Press and labeled one Fox News reporter “a criminal co-conspirator.”

In 2013 the Associated Press was informed by the Obama Justice Department that it had obtained the records for more than 20 telephone lines of its offices and journalists, including their home phones and cellphones, as part of a leak investigation into an Associated Press story about the CIA’s disruption of a Yemen-based terrorist plot to bomb an airliner.

In 2015, after Risen refused to reveal his sources during a seven-year legal fight, the Obama Justice Department eventually backed down, with Obama’s Attorney General Eric Holder saying he would not seek to jail reporters for protecting sources.

Trump's DOJ went to war against the press: Seizure of CNN reporter's personal records is chilling

  Trump's DOJ went to war against the press: Seizure of CNN reporter's personal records is chilling The big question in all this is why were they seeking these records in 2020? The DOJ didn't inform the media organizations or the reporters of their reasons but it seems logical to assume that it was part of Special Prosecutor John Durham's ongoing snipe hunt for the "origins of the Russia investigation." However, the fact that CNN's Starr, who did not cover the Russia investigation, was also subpoenaed suggests that this went way beyond Durham's mandate. If he is looking at leaks about North Korea policy he's way off track.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

Good Friday morning and welcome to Jamie McIntyre’s Daily on Defense, written and compiled by Washington Examiner National Security Senior Writer Jamie McIntyre (@jamiejmcintyre) and edited by Victor I. Nava. Email here with tips, suggestions, calendar items, and anything else. Sign up or read current and back issues at DailyonDefense.com. If signing up doesn’t work, shoot us an email and we’ll add you to our list. And be sure to follow us on Twitter: @dailyondefense.

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HAPPENING TODAY: President Joe Biden welcomes South Korean President Moon Jae-in to the White House at 12:45 p.m. Before the two leaders sit down in a one-on-one session and then an expanded bilateral exchange, Biden will present the Medal of Honor to retired Army Col. Ralph Puckett for “conspicuous gallantry” during the Korean War, with Moon and his wife in attendance.

President says he won't let DOJ seize phone records or emails from reporters: 'It's simply, simply wrong'

  President says he won't let DOJ seize phone records or emails from reporters: 'It's simply, simply wrong' President Joe Biden on Friday told CNN he would not let his Department of Justice seize phone records or emails from reporters. © Alex Brandon/AP President Joe Biden speaks during a joint news conference with South Korean President Moon Jae-in, in the East Room of the White House, Friday, May 21, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) Following a joint presser with Korean President Moon Jae-In in the White House East Room, Biden told CNN: "We should absolutely, positively -- it's wrong, it's simply, simply wrong," adding, "I will not let that happen.

“This visit will highlight the ironclad alliance between the United States and the Republic of Korea, and the broad and deep ties between our governments, people, and economies,” the White House said in a statement. “We expect that North Korea will be a central topic of the discussion,” added press secretary Jen Psaki, “but they also will discuss climate, they will also discuss economic partnership, they will also discuss China, and those will all be a part of this bilateral conversation.

Biden and Moon have a joint news conference scheduled for 5 p.m.

JOE BIDEN NEEDS THREE THINGS FROM SOUTH KOREAN PRESIDENT MOON

DOD LAGS IN VACCINE EFFORT: Now that masks are no longer required on Department of Defense installations for fully vaccinated employees, it's easier to get an idea of how many of the department’s civilian and military workers have gotten their shots. Walking the halls of the Pentagon yesterday, I saw lots of people still wearing masks, an indication of non-vaccination or extreme caution.

That anecdotal observation was confirmed by data released by the Pentagon in a late afternoon briefing, in which officials said 58% of the force has received at least one dose, and 44% has been fully vaccinated.

Still, the military is far from reaching herd immunity, reports the Washington Examiner’s Abraham Mahshie.

“We’re still having infections every single day in the hundreds,” said the Army Lt. Gen. Ronald Place, Pentagon’s Health Agency director. “Our efforts stop when we've eliminated people dying from this disease. Our efforts will stop when we've eliminated people being admitted to the hospital for this, and our efforts stop when it stops being a negative aspect to the way that commanders do commander business.”

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The Pentagon also released a memo yesterday outlining its efforts to overcome vaccine resistance in the ranks and encourage more military members to get their shots, which remain voluntary.

Leaders are encouraged to engage reluctant service members one-on-one and “acknowledge concerns in a nonjudgmental way.”

“These conversations are not easy, they may not be short, and they may require multiple touchpoints, but they are critically important. We know from our experience within the Department that use of this approach works, and encourage its widespread adoption,” said the memo signed by Deputy Defense Secretary Kathleen Hicks and Joint Chiefs Vice Chairman Gen. John Hyten.

MILITARY: MORE THAN HALF OF FORCE UNVACCINATED AMID HUNDREDS OF COVID-19 CASES EACH DAY

FRUSTRATION RISING ABOUT AFGHAN PARTNERS: At every congressional hearing on Afghanistan these days, the same question keeps coming up. What is the Biden administration doing to make sure the more than 18,000 Afghans who have worked for and with the Americans for two decades don’t face retribution from the Taliban once the U.S. troop withdrawal is done? And the answers continue to frustrate members of Congress.

“What's going to happen with our allies, people who stood by us?” asked Sen. Jim Inhofe at yesterday’s Armed Services Committee hearing, citing a report he read in USA Today about the panic many Afghans are in seeking Special Immigrant Visas to emigrate to the United States.

“In the article where it'll say, quote, that, ‘You will see the dead bodies in every street,’ and ‘They will slaughter us,’ They're in a panic right now because there's been such a backlog of these visas."

“We have a moral obligation to help those that have helped us over the past 20 years of our presence and work in Afghanistan,” said David Helvey, the Pentagon’s acting assistant secretary of defense for Indo-Pacific security affairs.

Biden’s DOJ Should Release the Trump-Case Memo

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“We are working very closely with our State Department and interagency colleagues to look at programs like the Special Immigrant Visa program, however as you know, that program in and of itself is limited,” Helvey said. “We'd like to be able to work with Congress to be able to increase the quotas and the resources for Special Immigrant Visas, but there are certain categories of our Afghan partners that wouldn't meet the thresholds for a Special Immigrant Visa.”

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

The Rundown

Washington Examiner: Military: More than half of force unvaccinated amid hundreds of COVID-19 cases each day

Washington Examiner: GOP lawmakers worry Pentagon is rooting out conservatives

Washington Examiner: Joe Biden needs three things from South Korean President Moon

Washington Examiner: Biden DOJ to meet with reporters about Trump-era secret records seizures

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New York Times: Biden Is Facing an Uneasy Truth: North Korea Isn’t Giving Up Its Nuclear Arsenal

AP: U.S., Russia At Odds Over Military Activity In The Arctic

Australian Broadcasting Company: Vladimir Putin Says Russia-China Ties At 'Highest Level In History' During Launch Of Nuclear Projects

Washington Post: After backing Assad, Iran and Russia compete for influence and spoils of war

Defense News: Senate Rejects Defense Spending ‘Parity’ Amendment

Air Force Magazine: F-15EX Wins Some, Loses Some in Northern Edge

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Defense One: Space Force’s First Battle Is With the U.S. Army

Defense Daily: NATO Starts Steadfast Defender Exercise With First Deployment Of UK Carrier

Foreign Policy: U.S. Nears Extension on Philippine Basing Pact

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Calendar

FRIDAY | MAY 21

12:35 p.m. — South Korean President Moon Jae-in visits the White House for talks with President Joe Biden. https://www.whitehouse.gov

10 a.m. — Center for Strategic and International Studies webinar: “The Role of Integrated Air and Missile Defense for Strategic Deterrence,” Lt. Gen. Daniel Karbler, commander of U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command. https://www.csis.org/events

12 p.m. — Hudson Institute webinar, “Ukraine's Latest Security Crisis,” with Assistant NATO Secretary General for Intelligence and Security David Cattler; Assistant NATO Secretary General for Public Diplomacy Baiba Braze; Luke Coffey, director of the Heritage Foundation's Center for Foreign Policy; and Peter Rough, senior fellow at Hudson https://www.hudson.org/events

5 p.m. — Joint news conference at the White House with South Korean President Moon Jae-in and President Joe Biden.

SATURDAY | MAY 22

10 a.m. — Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin delivers commencement address at the U.S. Military Academy’s class of 2021 graduation ceremony at West Point, New York. Live stream at https://www.youtube.com/channel

MONDAY | MAY 24

11 a.m. — House Armed Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces hearing: “FY22 Priorities for National Security Space Programs,” with John Hill, performing as assistant secretary of defense for space policy; Space Force Gen. David Thompson, vice chief of space operations; Christopher Scolese; director, National Reconnaissance Office; Maj. Gen. Charles Cleveland, associate director of operations, National Geospatial Intelligence Agency; Jon Ludwigson, director, contracting and national security acquisitions, GAO. https://armedservices.house.gov/hearings

TUESDAY | MAY 25

10 a.m. 106 Dirksen — Senate Appropriations Committee hearing: “A Review of the FY2022 State Department Budget Request,” with Secretary of State Antony Blinken. http://appropriations.senate.gov

1 p.m. — Center for a New American Security “virtual fireside chat” with Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr., chief of staff of the Air Force, and Stacie Pettyjohn, senior fellow and director defense program, CNAS. https://www.cnas.org/events/special-event-virtual-fireside-chat

WEDNESDAY | MAY 26

11:30 a.m. EDT — Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley delivers commencement address at the Air Force Academy’s class of 2021 graduation ceremony at Colorado Springs, Co. https://www.usafa.edu

1 p.m. — House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on "The State Department's Foreign Policy Strategy and FY2022 Budget Request." http://foreignaffairs.house.gov

THURSDAY | MAY 27

11 a.m. — House Armed Services Subcommittee on Seapower and Projection Forces hearing: “Department of the Navy Fiscal Year 2022 Budget Request for Seapower and Projection Forces,” with Jay Stefany, acting assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisition; Vice Adm. James Kilby, deputy chief of naval operations, warfighting requirements and capabilities; and Lt. Gen. Eric Smith, commanding general, Marine Corps Combat Development Command. https://armedservices.house.gov/hearings

3 p.m. — House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces hearing: “Army Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Program Update and Review of Electrification,” Tim Goddette, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for acquisition policy and logistics; and Michael Cadiuex, director, Combat Capabilities Development Command Ground Vehicle Systems Center. https://armedservices.house.gov/hearings

FRIDAY | MAY 28

10 a.m. — Vice President Kamala Harris delivers commencement address at the U.S. Naval Academy’s class of 2021 graduation ceremony in Annapolis, Md. https://www.usna.edu

MONDAY | MAY 31

Memorial Day — No Daily on Defense

QUOTE OF THE DAY

“We do have a moral obligation to help those that have helped us over the past 20 years. And we are working intensely with our inner agency colleagues to identify those mechanisms and the resources required to provide that type of assistance.”

David Helvey, acting assistant secretary of defense for Indo-Pacific security affairs, responding to a question during a Senate hearing about whether the U.S. might mount a mass evacuation of Afghans on the scale of what was done for Vietnamese refugees in the 1970s.

Tags: National Security, Daily on Defense

Original Author: Jamie McIntyre

Original Location: CNN's Barbara Starr's phone and email records secretly obtained by Trump DOJ

Biden’s DOJ Should Release the Trump-Case Memo .
Who can be trusted? We have to be able to answer that question for ourselves, which is why the best medicine is transparency.It is time for sunshine over at Justice — and lots of it.

usr: 1
This is interesting!