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Politics Hillicon Valley: Meat producer JBS USA hit by cyberattack | White House says JBS hack likely from Russia | Report finds Amazon injury rate above warehouse standard

02:10  02 june  2021
02:10  02 june  2021 Source:   thehill.com

JBS cyberattack disrupts Australian meat production

  JBS cyberattack disrupts Australian meat production CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Thousands of Australian meat workers had no work for a second day on Tuesday after a cyberattack crippled the world’s largest meat processing company. A government minister said it might be days before production resumes. JBS is also Australia’s largest meat and food processing company, with 47 facilities across the country including abattoirs, feedlots and meat processing sites. JBS employs around 11,000 people. JBSJBS is also Australia’s largest meat and food processing company, with 47 facilities across the country including abattoirs, feedlots and meat processing sites. JBS employs around 11,000 people.

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a sign in front of a fence: Hillicon Valley: Meat producer JBS USA hit by cyberattack | White House says JBS hack likely from Russia | Report finds Amazon injury rate above warehouse standard © Getty Hillicon Valley: Meat producer JBS USA hit by cyberattack | White House says JBS hack likely from Russia | Report finds Amazon injury rate above warehouse standard

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The largest beef supplier in the U.S. was hit by a ransomware attack over the weekend that disrupted operations in North America and Australia, with the White House announcing Tuesday that the company believes Russian-based hackers to be responsible. Meanwhile, a new report concluded that injury rates at Amazon were nearly double those at other warehouses over the past few years, and a Defense Department report concluded that drones made by a Chinese group were not as much of a threat as some officials have feared.

White House says Russian criminals are likely behind the cyberattack on the world's largest meat supplier, JBS USA

  White House says Russian criminals are likely behind the cyberattack on the world's largest meat supplier, JBS USA JBS USA says it was the target of an "organized cybersecurity attack" that affected servers in North American and Australian IT systems. "Read the original article on Business Insider

BRIEF REPRIEVE FOR THE COWS: One of the largest meat suppliers in the country was hit on Sunday by a cyberattack that impacted operations, with the attack coming just weeks after Colonial Pipeline was forced to temporarily shut down operations due to a similar attack.

Meat producing group JBS USA said in a statement released Sunday that it had been the "target of an organized cybersecurity attack" that had affected servers in North America and Australia.

JBS USA said it notified authorities of the attack, suspended all impacted systems and was working with an "Incident Response firm" to respond, stressing that its backup servers were not affected.

Read more about the attack here.

IT'S RUSSIA, AGAIN: The White House said Tuesday that a cyberattack on major meat producer JBS USA this week likely originated from Russia, saying it is engaging with Moscow to hold accountable the hackers believed to be responsible for the attack.

What the JBS cyberattack means for your meat supply

  What the JBS cyberattack means for your meat supply Shoppers may want to brace themselves for yet another possible supply crunch — this time with meat. © Michael Ciaglo/Bloomberg/Getty Images Experts say the impact of the JBS USA cyberattack on the country's meat supply will depend on how long it takes to resolve the issue. JBS USA, the country's top beef producer and its second largest producer of pork, suffered a cyberattack this weekend, prompting reported shutdowns at company plants in the United States and globally.

"JBS notified the administration that the ransom demand came from a criminal organization, likely based in Russia," White House principal deputy press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre told reporters Tuesday aboard Air Force One.

"The White House is engaging directly with the Russian government on this matter, and delivering the message that responsible states do not harbor ransomware criminals," she added.

Read more about the Biden administration response here.

INJURED AT AMAZON: Amazon reported serious injuries at nearly double the rate of other warehouses between 2017 and 2020, according to a report released Tuesday.

The Strategic Organizing Center (SOC), a coalition of labor unions, analyzed data released by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and found that there were 5.9 serious injuries per 100 Amazon workers over the course of 2020, compared to 3.3 serious injuries per 100 workers at other warehouses.

Meat producer JBS hit by ransomware attack from group 'likely based in Russia'

  Meat producer JBS hit by ransomware attack from group 'likely based in Russia' The Biden administration said Tuesday that it had been notified of a ransomware attack targeting the meat processing company JBS. "Meat producer JBS notified us on Sunday that they are the victims of a ransomware attack," White House principal deputy press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre told reporters, adding that the firm "notified the administration that the ransom demand came from a criminal organization likely based in Russia.

Serious injuries are those that require workers either taking time off or being moved onto lighter tasks.

"Amazon's abysmal health and safety record is not an accident," the report argues. "Rather, it is the predictable outcome of a company that prioritizes growth and profits over the health and safety of its employees."

The company has been on a hiring spree in recent years and is now the second-largest private employer in the U.S., with nearly 1.3 million workers worldwide. In 2020, Amazon reported 24,505 serious injuries among its average annual workforce of 581,624.

The injuries at Amazon warehouses forced employees off work for an average of 46.3 days in 2020, longer than the industry standard.

The serious injuries per 100 workers ratio at Amazon warehouses grew from 6.5 in 2017 to 6.9 in 2018 and 7.8 in 2019, the peak year. By comparison, those ratios were 2.9, 3.1 and 3.1 per 100 workers the same years at non-Amazon warehouses, according to data shared with The Hill.

Amazon spokesperson Kelly Nantel told The Hill that the company has made investments into health and safety teams, but she did not dispute the veracity of the injury data shared by the SOC.

Hacking: These are just the attacks we know about

  Hacking: These are just the attacks we know about Ransomware hacks are everywhere if you look for them. These are just the ones we know about: © Shutterstock Food -- A hack of JBS Foods, the world's largest meat processor, shut multiple plants over the weekend.Fuel -- The Colonial Pipeline hack led to fuel shortages on the East Coast last month. The company has admitted to paying more $4.4 million in ransom, although the FBI has said ransoms of more than $25 million have been demanded.Hospitals -- A hack of the Scripps hospital system in San Diego has led to the breach of medical information for more than 150,000 people.

Read more.

OPEN SEASON: Two drone models made by China's largest manufacturer have been cleared for use by a Pentagon audit, according to a report summary obtained by The Hill.

An analysis of the two Da Jiang Innovations (DJI) drones built for government use found "no malicious code or intent" and are "recommended for use by government entities and forces working with US services," the summary said.

The remainder of the report, dated May 6, remains classified. The report's author, second chief warrant officer with the U.S. Army Special Operations Command Adam Prater, declined to publicly comment on the summary.

The Defense Department did not immediately respond to an inquiry from The Hill.

The report appears to analyze changes made to two drones used by the Interior Department.

The agency temporarily grounded its fleet of more than 500 DJI drones in January 2020 over cybersecurity concerns, with some exceptions for emergency use. The Interior Department in March made it easier for a drone mission to qualify as an emergency.

Read more.

SEIZED DOMAIN: The Department of Justice (DOJ) on Tuesday announced that the U.S. has obtained court orders to seize control of two online domains used by suspected Russian hackers to send malicious emails to organizations posing as the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

Largest meat producer getting back online after cyberattack

  Largest meat producer getting back online after cyberattack The FBI attributed the attack on meat processor JBS SA to REvil, a Russian-speaking gang that has made some of the largest ransomware demands on record.In a statement late Wednesday, the FBI attributed the attack on Brazil-based meat processor JBS SA to REvil, a Russian-speaking gang that has made some of the largest ransomware demands on record in recent months. The FBI said it will work to bring the group to justice and it urged anyone who is the victim of a cyberattack to contact the bureau immediately.

The domains were seized following Microsoft's announcement last week that what it assessed to be Russian hackers had accessed an email marketing program used by USAID to target hundreds of groups with malicious emails.

Microsoft assessed that the hackers were the same group behind the SolarWinds incident, which allowed Russian government-backed hackers to compromise nine federal agencies and at least 100 private sector groups for most of a year.

Following the new incident, court orders were issued in the Eastern District of Virginia allowing the DOJ to seize command and control and malware distribution domains used as part of this effort in order to protect other organizations from being targeted and to identify the hackers.

Read more about the actions here.

ON THE ROAD AGAIN: Drivers are gradually returning to the Uber ride-hailing platform after the company struggled to meet demand this year as more Americans got vaccinated and started traveling again.

The company said the week of May 17 marked a new record for drivers returning to the platform since the start of the year, with 33,000 drivers joining the platform, Reuters reported Tuesday.

The platform reportedly said its active driver hours for the week increased 4.4 percent from the previous week, but declined to say how that number compared to pre-pandemic times.

"With the economy bouncing back, drivers are returning to Uber in force to take advantage of higher earnings opportunities from our driver stimulus while they are still available," Carrol Chang, Uber's head of U.S. and Canada driver operations, said in a statement to Reuters.

As ransomware attacks cripple US infrastructure, a look at why they're on the rise

  As ransomware attacks cripple US infrastructure, a look at why they're on the rise A recent spate of ransomware attacks has left the nation reeling. A recent spate of ransomware attacks has crippled critical American infrastructure, disrupted major food supply chains and revealed that no firm -- big or small -- is safe from these insidious cyberattacks.

Read more here.

BRING IT ON: Amazon has cut its arbitration proceedings and is allowing customers and employees to file lawsuits in a move that received no official announcement.

The change is shown on Amazon's website with the arbitration requirements being dropped and a line about how lawsuits can be brought in state or federal courts against the company being posted, The Wall Street Journal reported.

The arbitration process is used by many companies and is put in a customer's contract. The process is similar to a court case but it is done privately, has no appeals, less evidence is presented and multiple customers are not allowed to team up on the same accusation.

Read more here.

FLEETING ADS: Twitter is testing ads on its temporary story feature Fleets, the company said Tuesday.

"Fleet ads are full-screen billboards for advertisers," Twitter said in a blog post.

The ads will be the first full-screen, vertical ads on Twitter and are similar to the ads users see in stories on Instagram or Snapchat.

The update comes after Twitter launched Fleets globally in November, following updates from other social media platforms that launched 24-hour story features.

Read more about the update.

ICYMI: UNDER PRESSURE: Officials are calling for harsher measures against Russia following Microsoft's assessment that hackers behind the devastating SolarWinds hack were continuing to launch cyberattacks against U.S. government agencies and other organizations.

President Biden just last month levied sweeping sanctions on Russia in retaliation for both the SolarWinds hack and election interference. But in the wake of the new hacking efforts, some officials are urging the Biden administration to get tougher.

"If Moscow is responsible, this brazen act of utilizing emails associated with the U.S. government demonstrates that Russia remains undeterred despite sanctions following the SolarWinds attack," House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) said in a statement Friday. "Those sanctions gave the administration flexibility to tighten the economic screws further if necessary - it now appears necessary."

JBS Must Open 24-Hour Hotline to Report Discrimination, Pay $5.5M to Muslim Ex-Employees

  JBS Must Open 24-Hour Hotline to Report Discrimination, Pay $5.5M to Muslim Ex-Employees "This case serves as a reminder that systemic discrimination and harassment remain significant problems that we as a society must tackle," the chair of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said.The commission's lawsuit filed in federal court in Denver in 2010 said JBS discriminated against Muslim, Somalian migrants and Black employees at its U.S. headquarters in Greeley, Colo. The $5.5 million is to be paid to 300 employees named in the settlement.

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Mark Warner (D-Va.) had similar thoughts.

"We have to step up our cyber defenses, and we must make clear to Russia - and any other adversaries - that they will face consequences for this and any other malicious cyber activity," Warner said in a separate statement Friday.

Read more here.

ICYMI: ALTERING THE ALGORITHM: Instagram has changed its algorithm after a group of employees complained that pro-Palestinian content was being hidden from other users in the midst of conflict between Israelis and Palestinians that culminated in an 11-day conflict in Gaza.

The Verge reports that Instagram will now surface original and reposted content at the same rate, as it had previously surfaced original content before reposted.

As BuzzFeed News reported last week, employees at Facebook, the parent company of Instagram, complained that content featuring Arabic or pro-Palestinian content was often flagged or received a label warning.

Read more here.

Lighter click: Pride Month Puppos!

An op-ed to chew on: To counter China, allied nations must cooperate on technology innovation

NOTABLE LINKS FROM AROUND THE WEB:

U.S. tech giants' vise over Israel tightens despite ceasefire (Politico / Emily Birnbaum)

Ex-US ambassador, anti-corruption activists in Ukraine were targets of suspected Russian phishing (CyberScoop / Sean Lyngaas)

Uber and Lyft Experiment with Labor Practices Amid Driver Shortage (The Markup / Dara Kerr)

JBS Must Open 24-Hour Hotline to Report Discrimination, Pay $5.5M to Muslim Ex-Employees .
"This case serves as a reminder that systemic discrimination and harassment remain significant problems that we as a society must tackle," the chair of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said.The commission's lawsuit filed in federal court in Denver in 2010 said JBS discriminated against Muslim, Somalian migrants and Black employees at its U.S. headquarters in Greeley, Colo. The $5.5 million is to be paid to 300 employees named in the settlement.

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