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Politics Biden, Capito to continue bipartisan infrastructure talks Friday

12:50  03 june  2021
12:50  03 june  2021 Source:   abcnews.go.com

Capito, ‘a doer,’ embraces deal-maker role on infrastructure

  Capito, ‘a doer,’ embraces deal-maker role on infrastructure At the beginning of this year, Sen. Shelley Moore Capito appeared poised to take the gavel of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. But when two Senate races in Georgia upended that possibility, she became something else: the go-to deal-maker for Senate Republicans on infrastructure. In just 24 hours last weekend, the benefits and […] The post Capito, ‘a doer,’ embraces deal-maker role on infrastructure appeared first on Roll Call.

President Joe Biden will reconnect with Republican Sen. Shelley Moore Capito on Friday to further discuss a possible bipartisan compromise on an infrastructure bill.

The two met in the Oval Office for just over an hour Wednesday afternoon to talk about the $928 billion GOP infrastructure proposal unveiled last week, but announced no major breakthroughs on how they plan to bridge their still substantive differences.

Kelley Moore, a spokeswoman for Capito, said the senator -- who is leading negotiations on infrastructure -- intends to connect with other Republicans working on the package before resuming talks with the administration.

GOP Sen. Shelley Moore Capito Defends Biden's Efforts at Bipartisanship: 'We Can Work Together'

  GOP Sen. Shelley Moore Capito Defends Biden's Efforts at Bipartisanship: 'We Can Work Together' The Republican said Biden "has expressed to me and our group numerous times his desire to work with us."Republican leaders and many lawmakers have repeatedly attacked Biden for leading in a partisan manner after campaigning as a moderate who would seek out bipartisan solutions. GOP lawmakers point to the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan, which Biden and the Democrats pushed through with no Republican votes. Biden has taken a different approach with his proposed American Jobs Plan—focused on infrastructure—as he and White House officials continue to meet with Republican negotiators.

Joe Biden in a suit and tie: President Joe Biden speaks at a rally during commemorations of the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre on June 01, 2021 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. © Brandon Bell/Getty Images President Joe Biden speaks at a rally during commemorations of the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre on June 01, 2021 in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

In a statement following the meeting, Moore said the senator is still hopeful for a bipartisan outcome.

"Senator Capito reiterated to the president her desire to work together to reach an infrastructure agreement that can pass Congress in a bipartisan way," according to the statement. "She also stressed the progress that the Senate has already made. Senator Capito is encouraged that negotiations have continued."

But while conversations between the administration and GOP negotiators chug along, the administration has signaled that time is running out to strike a deal.

Biden-GOP spending talks hit critical juncture as patience runs thin

  Biden-GOP spending talks hit critical juncture as patience runs thin President Biden will speak with Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) on Friday afternoon to discuss a potential bipartisan compromise on infrastructure amid signs the talks are nearing their end as both sides remain far apart on key components.Friday's discussion - slated to take place by phone instead of in-person like the previous meetings - comes as the clock is ticking for striking an agreement.Capito, the lead GOP negotiator, and Biden missed an informal Memorial Day deadline to clinch a deal. Democratic lawmakers, who start returning to Washington next week, are now eager to move forward on an infrastructure package, with or without Republicans.

The White House has for weeks said they wanted to see progress on a bipartisan infrastructure package by Memorial Day, but with the holiday now passed, they've kicked the ball down the road a bit. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg told ABC "This Week" co-anchor Martha Raddatz that he needs to see movement on a deal by the time the Senate returns from its holiday recess.

John Barrasso, Shelley Moore Capito, Roy Blunt standing next to a man in a suit and tie © J. Scott Applewhite/AP

"As the president so often says, inaction is not an option, and we really are facing some serious time pressure as we look to that week following this week when Congress is going to be back in D.C," Buttigieg said.

MORE: GOP embrace of $1 trillion infrastructure package could help make a deal: Buttigieg

The Republican offer has nearly doubled since Capito unveiled their initial $568 billion framework in April, but it still leaves the Republicans hundreds of billions of dollars short of Biden's most recent $1.7 billion pitch.

What you should know about W. Va. Sens. Manchin and Capito

  What you should know about W. Va. Sens. Manchin and Capito WVa. Sens. Joe Manchin, a Democrat, and Republican Shelley Moore Capito are positioned to swing key parts of President Joe Biden's legislative agenda.West Virginia, which will be down to only two congressional seats after its next redistricting, isn't typically as powerful in Congress as larger, more populous counterparts such as California, New York and Texas.

And while the GOP offer is higher now than ever, their overall figure takes into account billions already approved in a water infrastructure bill earlier this year and considers a not-yet-passed bipartisan highway spending reauthorization worth over $300 billion as the "anchor" of their package. In total, the GOP offer proposes about $250 billion in new spending, while the administration has proposed that its entire $1.7 trillion package be funded with new money.

Negotiators have also sparred for weeks over how to fund the massive package. Republicans have refused tax hikes on corporations, which they said is a referendum on the 2017 tax bill. And Democrats have refused to consider using user fees, such as tolls or a gas tax, to pay for the package.

Republicans sought to side-step both concerns by proposing the federal government repurpose already allocated, but unspent funds from previous COVID-19 relief bills.

But the administration has said there may not be as sizable a pot of money available to repurpose as Republicans suggest. They've also said they may not be comfortable repurposing funds from the $2.2 trillion COVID-19 relief bill.

On The Money: Biden ends infrastructure talks with Capito, pivots to bipartisan group | Some US billionaires had years where they paid no taxes: report | IRS to investigate leak

  On The Money: Biden ends infrastructure talks with Capito, pivots to bipartisan group | Some US billionaires had years where they paid no taxes: report | IRS to investigate leak Happy Tuesday and welcome back to On The Money, where we plan exploiting the taco tax break as much as we can. I'm Sylvan Lane, and here's your nightly guide to everything affecting your bills, bank account and bottom line.See something I missed? Let me know at slane@thehill.com or tweet me @SylvanLane. And if you like your newsletter, you can subscribe to it here: http://bit.ly/1NxxW2N.Write us with tips, suggestions and news: slane@thehill.com, njagoda@thehill.com and nelis@thehill.com. Follow us on Twitter: @SylvanLane, @NJagoda and @NivElis.

"We are concerned that the proposal on how to pay for the plan remains unclear: we are worried that major cuts in COVID relief funds could imperil pending aid to small businesses, restaurants and rural hospitals using this money to get back on their feet after the crush of the pandemic," White House press secretary Jen Psaki said last week.

Publicly, most Republicans are still backing a bipartisan path forward. Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said at a press conference in Kentucky on Wednesday that he is "hoping for the best that we can actually reach a bipartisan agreement on infrastructure."

But the fact remains that there are still major differences between the administration and Senate Republicans on how infrastructure even ought to be defined.

Pat Toomey, John Barrasso, Shelley Moore Capito, Roy Blunt standing next to a person in a suit and tie: Sen. Shelley Moore Capito speaks at a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, May 27, 2021. © J. Scott Applewhite/AP Sen. Shelley Moore Capito speaks at a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, May 27, 2021.

Republicans have argued that things like child care, home care, work training and other "human infrastructure" elements of the White House package have no place in an infrastructure bill.

The GOP package includes $506 billion for roads, bridges and major projects, $98 billion for public transit, $46 billion for freight rail, and funding for ports, airports, water storage, broadband and infrastructure financing -- items they've branded as "core" infrastructure.

Top Republican accuses White House of moving goalposts on infrastructure - but she didn't budge on either of Biden's requests

  Top Republican accuses White House of moving goalposts on infrastructure - but she didn't budge on either of Biden's requests After nearly six weeks, Biden ended infrastructure negotiations with Sen. Shelley Moore Capito. "They kept moving the goalposts on us," Capito said.Capito said in a Fox News interview on Wednesday that the White House "kept moving the goalposts" on the Republican group, and she was "frustrated" with how things turned out.

Buttigieg told Raddatz on Sunday he still has a "lot of concerns" about items that Republicans have stripped from their counteroffer.

Increasingly it seems that if the White House wants to strike a deal they'll need to split their package in two, keeping core infrastructure priorities on one bill that could pass the Senate through regular order with GOP backing and then offering a second bill to pass the more controversial "human infrastructure" priorities down party lines.

To do this, Democrats would need to use a procedural tool called reconciliation which allows the Senate to bypass the usual 60-vote threshold necessary to pass legislation.

MORE: Senate Republicans unveil latest counteroffer to Biden on infrastructure spending

Splitting the infrastructure bill in two could score Biden a bipartisan win, and Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., said Thursday that the president conveyed to Republicans his intention to do as much.

"The president was very upfront in our meeting with him, you know, if we divide this up he said, 'I'll try to get the rest of it some other way' and we totally understand that," Blunt said. "As a matter of fact, we don't mind debating things in the other bill and seeing if that's what the American people want to do, but let's not do it under the guise of infrastructure."

But using reconciliation will require the support of all 50 Democrats in the Senate and right now, at least two Democrats, Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema, oppose using the procedural work around.

Biden seemed to express his growing frustration on Tuesday, without naming names, though he was speaking about a separate voting rights bill.

"I hear all the folks on TV saying, 'Why doesn't Biden get this done?' Well, Biden only has a majority, effectively, of four votes in the House and a tie in the Senate, with two members of the Senate who vote more with my Republican friends," Biden said. "But we're not giving up."

MORE: Republicans plan to send Biden infrastructure counteroffer worth nearly $1 trillion

Psaki defended Biden's remarks on Wednesday, telling reporters that Biden was commenting on the media coverage of these members, not the members themselves.

While negotiations on a larger package are ongoing, committees in both the House and Senate are working their way through the surface transportation reauthorization bill that Capito describes as the "anchor" of her package.

The Senate committee managing the bill passed it unanimously out of committee last week. The House is expected to take up similar legislation in committee soon.

Have West Virginia's senators squandered their state's moment in the sun? .
On Monday afternoon, White House press secretary Jen Psaki made that rare assertion on which Democrats and Republicans can both agree. “West Virginia doesn’t usually get this much attention,” she said. The state has a breathtaking new national park, New River Gorge, but she didn’t mean that, either. The press secretary was also not referring to Babydog, Gov. Jim Justice’s jowly canine, who recently became the unofficial mascot of the state’s coronavirus vaccination effort. “West Virginia” has of late meant just two people, at least as far as Washington is concerned: Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, a Republican, and Sen. Joe Manchin, a Democrat.

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