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Politics The left hates Joe Manchin. His fellow Senate Dems are staying quiet.

03:05  08 june  2021
03:05  08 june  2021 Source:   politico.com

Manchin's homegrown bipartisanship comes up against a changing world

  Manchin's homegrown bipartisanship comes up against a changing world When Joe Manchin was in the fight of his political life, vying for reelection in a state where being a Democrat had long been out of fashion, the senator's opening message to voters focused on the place he knew best: Farmington, West Virginia. © Maddie McGarvey for CNN Michael Angelucci, former state delegate, and Donna Costello, former mayor of Farmington.

Joe Manchin is sparking outright fury from liberals — with some Black Democrats invoking Jim Crow and Mitch McConnell as they blast the West Virginian's resistance to a sweeping elections bill. Manchin ’s fellow Senate Democrats are being far more conciliatory. After all, the 50-vote Senate Manchin on Sunday criticized his party’s elections and ethics signature bill for lacking Republican support, vowing to vote against it and charging that “voting and election reform that is done in a partisan manner will all but ensure partisan divisions continue to deepen.” He also dug in to protect the 60-vote

Manchin is a centrist Democrat, but one progressive congressman called him “the new Mitch McConnell”, for helping the Republican Senate leader in his quest to stop progress on the Democrats’ agenda at all costs. In a column for the Charleston Gazette-Mail on Sunday, Manchin said he opposed the For the People Act, or HR1, which currently has no He also reiterated his support of the filibuster, under which 60 votes are needed to pass most legislation. The Senate is split 50-50 between the two parties and controlled by Democrats only through Kamala Harris’s casting vote as vice-president.

Joe Manchin is sparking outright fury from liberals — with some Black Democrats invoking Jim Crow and Mitch McConnell as they blast the West Virginian's resistance to a sweeping elections bill. Manchin’s fellow Senate Democrats are being far more conciliatory.

a man wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) on Sunday criticized his party’s elections and ethics signature bill for lacking Republican support. © Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) on Sunday criticized his party’s elections and ethics signature bill for lacking Republican support.

After all, the 50-vote Senate majority needs Manchin's vote to do just about anything. So not even its most progressive members seem to want to poke the bear.

Yet angst is quietly rising inside the Democratic caucus over Manchin’s approach. He opposes changing the rules for filibustering legislation, challenges the urgency of pursuing a party-line infrastructure spending bill and plans to vote against his party's high-profile elections bill. And amid Manchin's reluctance, it’s not clear at the moment how Democrats will break through on the priorities they campaigned on for years.

Mondaire Jones Says Manchin Op-Ed Might as Well Be Titled 'Why I'll Vote to Preserve Jim Crow'

  Mondaire Jones Says Manchin Op-Ed Might as Well Be Titled 'Why I'll Vote to Preserve Jim Crow' The West Virginia Democratic senator has come under fire for refusing to support the For the People Act following an op-ed he wrote for the Charleston Gazette-Mail.In the Sunday op-ed, the moderate Democrat from West Virginia said he was against the legislation because it had not garnered any Republican support. He felt a resolution for changes in voting rights should be reached with agreement from both parties.

WASHINGTON — Senator Joe Manchin III of West Virginia, the most conservative member of his party in the Senate , has a message for fellow Democrats hoping to capture the majority and quickly begin muscling through legislation to bring about sweeping, liberal change: not on his watch. With Democrats mounting an intense, long-shot campaign to win two Georgia Senate seats whose fates will be decided in runoffs in January — a feat that would give them control of both chambers of Congress along with the presidency — Mr. Manchin ’s unequivocal stance against ending the filibuster means

Joe Manchin ensured the enduring wrath of his party's activist base by announcing in an op-ed in the Charleston Gazette-Mail on Sunday that he would be voting against the For the People Act. Though you'd never know it from the howls of rage from the left , Manchin is right about just about everything More name-calling and denunciation on Twitter? More teeth gnashing and foot stomping by progressive activists? Threatening Manchin with a primary challenge from his left — as if that would accomplish anything other than increasing the chances that the GOP adds to its margin in the Senate by taking

“Of course I’m frustrated. Who isn’t frustrated?” said one Senate Democrat who requested anonymity to speak freely. “Do you want to see the patches where I pulled my hair out?”

Those who serve alongside Manchin generally see nothing to gain by ticking off their mercurial colleague, at least in public. That’s not just because of how desperately they need Manchin to confirm President Joe Biden’s judicial nominees. Democrats also will have to rely on his vote if they try to push through a sweeping infrastructure spending bill on party lines.

Manchin on Sunday criticized his party’s elections and ethics signature bill for lacking Republican support, vowing to vote against it and charging that “voting and election reform that is done in a partisan manner will all but ensure partisan divisions continue to deepen.” He also dug in to protect the 60-vote threshold now required to steer most legislation through the upper chamber.

What you should know about W. Va. Sens. Manchin and Capito

  What you should know about W. Va. Sens. Manchin and Capito WVa. Sens. Joe Manchin, a Democrat, and Republican Shelley Moore Capito are positioned to swing key parts of President Joe Biden's legislative agenda.West Virginia, which will be down to only two congressional seats after its next redistricting, isn't typically as powerful in Congress as larger, more populous counterparts such as California, New York and Texas.

Joe Manchin on Sunday defended his decision to vote against a sweeping voting rights bill and reiterated his opposition to gutting the filibuster Senate Republicans are ready to deploy the filibuster to block a commission on the Jan. 6 insurrection, shattering chances for a bipartisan probe of the deadly assault on the U.S. Capitol and reviving pressure to do away with the procedural tactic that critics say has lost its purpose.

New York Rep. Jamaal Bowman on Monday compared fellow Democrat Sen. Joe Manchin to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and said he is trying to thwart President Joe Biden's agenda after the West Virginia lawmaker stood by his decision to vote against a sweeping voting rights bill and opposition to gutting the filibuster.

Those words stung many of Manchin’s colleagues. They're still trying not to antagonize him, because as chief vote-counter Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) put it: “Today’s adversary is tomorrow’s ally in this place.”

Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) spent years pressing to pass the massive elections and ethics bill in the Senate that Manchin formally tanked on Sunday. Merkley declined to criticize Manchin on Monday but said he was “very concerned about whether the Senate is a functional place and body.”

Then there’s Sen. Raphael Warnock, one of two Georgia Democrats to hand his party the majority with surprising wins in January. Warnock spoke to Manchin on Sunday and said he was “hopeful” to eventually win over the moderate Democrat.

“No, I’m not frustrated with my colleague. We’ve got to find a way to pass voting rights. I think he understands that,” Warnock said. “Joe Manchin understands that this is a defining moment in American history.”

Some Democrats wonder when Schumer will get tough with Manchin

  Some Democrats wonder when Schumer will get tough with Manchin Sen. Joe Manchin's defiant statement that he will not vote for a sweeping election reform bill nor vote to get rid of the filibuster has progressive groups and some Democratic lawmakers wondering when Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) will get tough with the West Virginia Democrat.Manchin is a member of Schumer's leadership team and Schumer has several points of leverage, including the power to replace him as chairman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. But Schumer doesn't have a reputation for getting tough with colleagues. Instead, he keeps them close and hardly ever criticizes Democratic senators who cause him headaches.

West Virginia Democratic Senator Joe Manchin said in an op/ed Sunday that he will vote against President Joe Biden's For the People voting rights act because it includes ending the filibuster. Psaki, meanwhile, fielded many questions about Senator Joe Machin, a Democrat from West Virginia who announced this weekend he will vote against voting rights legislation, effectively killing it. With a 50-50 Senate , Biden needs every Democratic vote. Last week he called on Machin and fellow moderate Democratic Senator Kyrsten Sinema to support the Democrats' bill.

Joe Manchin announced Tuesday he planned to stay put in the Senate and not run for West Virginia governor, spelling relief for Democrats who now see a pathway to taking the Senate majority in 2020. “I have always said that ‘public service is not self-service.’ So, when considering whether to run for Manchin entered the Senate in 2010 and ran for re-election last year. He squeaked out a win against Republican Patrick Morrisey, the state’s attorney general, with 49.5 percent of the vote. Republicans were licking their lips at the prospect of easily replacing Manchin in the Senate as the state has

That’s a far cry from the blistering rhetoric of House progressives, who’ve spent the last 36 hours lacing into Manchin. Rep. Mondaire Jones (D-N.Y.) said Manchin’s op-ed “might as well be titled, ‘Why I’ll vote to preserve Jim Crow'” and Rep. Jamaal Bowman (D-N.Y.) tweeted that Manchin is the “new Mitch McConnell.”

Even Biden has flashed some frustration with Manchin. Last week, he suggested that Manchin and Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) vote more with Republicans.

Other Democrats have issues with the party's agenda, of course, and Sinema also is rock-ribbed in her own defense of the filibuster. But Manchin is the most visible sand in the gears of Democrats’ tenuous majority, writing both an op-ed and appearing on two Sunday shows to push his message of bipartisanship.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) said he was “saddened” to hear of Manchin’s latest brushback to progressive priorities.

“I hope that Sen. Manchin will be impacted by the same, sort of, aggregation of grievances that has caused almost all my colleagues to change their minds about the filibuster,” Blumenthal said.

Inside Biden and Manchin's Joemance

  Inside Biden and Manchin's Joemance Democratic senators say that only the president can convince the influential centrist to sign off on key parts of the party's agenda.Four months after Biden helped secure Manchin’s vote for a party-line, $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief law, the president is taking a different approach with the West Virginia Democrat who's blocking multiple party priorities. Biden didn't sound pleased last week when, during a speech marking the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa massacre, he appeared to take a public swipe at Manchin and Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) by citing two Democrats who frequently sided with Republicans.

Some Democrats say that despite his current opposition to the elections bill, Manchin could still help the cause, either by helping to advance it procedurally or being open to supporting it if changes are made. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) has vowed to put the legislation on the floor the last week of June. But a vote that’s not unanimous would only allow Republicans to highlight the bipartisan opposition, working against Schumer's goal.

Manchin is slated to meet with civil rights groups Tuesday about voting. Durbin said senators should “talk to Joe” before putting a voting rights bill on the floor.

“He has certainly not said that he would vote against a motion to proceed,” said Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.). “And we know that he would vote against it as is. But the question is: OK, can there be adjustments made? And we know there are some things he really likes.”

Manchin has been playing team ball since tanking the nomination of Neera Tanden to be Biden’s budget director. He’s reliably supported Biden’s nominees ever since and cast the deciding vote for the $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill. He’s also probably the only Democrat who can win a Senate seat in West Virginia these days.

But the gregarious centrist's talk about aisle-crossing is at a crucial pivot point. He’s working with a group of bipartisan senators on an infrastructure package of about $900 billion over five years, according to a source with direct knowledge of the talks. That figure includes current spending levels and could be released in the coming days. It’s also far short of what Biden and progressive Democrats want.

Manchin has also pushed for a more narrow voting rights bill named after the late Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) as an alternative to the bigger elections package. That proposal has picked up the support of Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) but has little chance of getting support from the 10 Republicans needed to overcome a filibuster.

“I admire Joe’s optimism but at some point anyone who is defending the 60-vote threshold has an obligation to help the body to get to 60 votes,” said Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii.) "It would be wonderful if we could get 10 Republican votes for democracy reforms. There’s just literally no evidence that it’s going to happen.”

Joe Manchin keeps Democrats guessing on sweeping election bill .
Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) is keeping his colleagues guessing on whether he will back a sweeping election bill during a high-profile vote next week. Democrats are expected to hold a key test vote next week on S. 1, titled the For the People Act. The debate will spotlight a simmering months-long fight over voting rights. The measure is guaranteed to run headlong into a filibuster, but Democrats are hoping to at least put up a unified front and keep the focus on GOP opposition - not their own divisions. Progressive activists, meanwhile, want to get all senators in the Democratic caucus to back the bill.

usr: 4
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