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Politics Volkswagen says former executive paying $13M over role in emissions scandal

11:55  10 june  2021
11:55  10 june  2021 Source:   thehill.com

He Robbed a Taco Joint With a Toy Water Gun for $264. He Got Life in Prison.

  He Robbed a Taco Joint With a Toy Water Gun for $264. He Got Life in Prison. On a Sunday night in February 1981, Rolf Kaestel robbed an Arkansas taco restaurant using a toy water gun. No one was injured in the stickup. He stole $264—and was sentenced to life in prison. Forty years later, Kaestel is still behind bars for aggravated robbery. His penalty is unusually severe, supporters say, for a crime without injuries or even a physical altercation. This year could be the 70-year-old inmate’s final shot at redemption, a taste of freedom for however many good years he has left. Kaestel’s fate now rests in the hands of Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson, who denied him clemency in 2015 and is expected to decide on his latest application any day now.

Volkswagen said Wednesday that its former CEO will pay more than $13 million for his role in the company's 2015 emissions scandal.

a close up of a blue car: Volkswagen says former executive paying $13M over role in emissions scandal © The Hill Volkswagen says former executive paying $13M over role in emissions scandal

Volkswagen issued a statement saying that Martin Winterkorn has agreed to pay 11.2 million euros over the controversy, which involved the automaker cheating on emissions tests. Former head of Audi AG Rupert Stadler agreed to pay 4.1 million euros in fines, former Audi executive Stefan Knirsch paid 1 million euros and former Porsche executive Wolfgang Hertz paid 1.5 million euros.

California urges EPA to let state set car-emissions standard

  California urges EPA to let state set car-emissions standard WASHINGTON (AP) — Officials from California, New York and other states urged the Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday to allow California to set its own automobile tailpipe pollution standards, which would reverse a Trump administration policy and could help usher in stricter emissions standards for new passenger vehicles nationwide. The Biden administration has said it will withdrew Trump-era restrictions on state tailpipe emission rules and has moved to grant California permission to set more stringent pollution standards for cars and SUVs.

The Environmental Protection Agency caught the automaker using software that let its cars pass emission tests and then later turn off their pollution controls when driving.

An investigation found that that Winterkorn failed "to comprehensively and promptly clarify the circumstances behind the use of unlawful software functions in 2.0l TDI diesel engines sold in the North American market between 2009 and 2015."

Volkswagen said in its statement that Winterkorn also failed to answer "truthfully" when questioned about the matter by U.S. authorities.

Winterkorn resigned from position as CEO in September 2015, and the automaker had to pay more than 31 billion euros in fines, recall costs and compensation to owners, ABC News reported.

MLB updates COVID protocols for vaccinated players, staff .
Most notably, fully vaccinated individuals will no longer be tested for COVID-19 unless they have symptoms or have been exposed to the virus. © Omar Ornelas via Imagn Content Services, LLC The handling of fully vaccinated individuals drew some attention last month after Nationals starter Erick Fedde tested positive for the coronavirus. Fedde, who had been fully vaccinated and was asymptomatic, was forced to go on the injured list. (Between his initial isolation period and subsequent rehab, he ultimately missed just more than three weeks of action.

usr: 1
This is interesting!