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Politics Liberals celebrate the demise of the Keystone XL pipeline, but conservatives promise to keep the issue alive

00:30  11 june  2021
00:30  11 june  2021 Source:   news.yahoo.com

Fight over Canadian oil rages on after pipeline's demise

  Fight over Canadian oil rages on after pipeline's demise BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Keystone XL is dead after a 12-year attempt to build the oil pipeline, yet the fight over Canadian crude rages on as emboldened environmentalists target other projects and pressure President Joe Biden to intervene — all while oil imports from the north keep rising. Biden dealt the fatal blow to the partially built $9 billion Keystone XL in January when he revoked its border-crossing permit issued by former President Donald Trump. On Wednesday, sponsors TC Energy and the province of Alberta gave up and declared the line “terminated.

Canadian gas company TC Energy announced Wednesday that it had terminated its Keystone XL pipeline project months after President Biden revoked a key permit on his first day of office because of concerns over the pipeline’s impact on climate change.

This decision by TC Energy concludes a thirteen year battle surrounding the building of the pipeline and represents a victory for environmental groups who have been calling attention to the harmful effects of processing oil sands crude since the Keystone project was first proposed in 2008.

In its press release Wednesday, TC Energy said it “will continue to coordinate with regulators, stakeholders and Indigenous groups to meet its environmental and regulatory commitments and ensure a safe termination of and exit from the Project.”

Keystone XL pipeline nixed after Biden stands firm on permit

  Keystone XL pipeline nixed after Biden stands firm on permit BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The sponsor of the Keystone XL crude oil pipeline pulled the plug on the contentious project Wednesday after Canadian officials failed to persuade President Joe Biden to reverse his cancellation of its permit on the day he took office. Calgary-based TC Energy said it would work with government agencies “to ensure a safe termination of and exit" from the partially built line, which was to transport crude from the oil sand fields of western Canada to Steele City, Nebraska.

The proposed 1,179 pipeline would have eventually carried 830,000 barrels (35 million gallons) of tar sands oil from Hardisty, Alberta to Steele City, Neb. Its construction was stalled in 2015 by President Obama but resuscitated in 2019 by President Trump when he signed a presidential permit that allowed TC Energy to effectively “construct, connect, operate and maintain pipeline facilities [...] for the import of oil from Canada to the United States.” Since construction began last year, only around 300 miles of pipeline has been built.

Pipes for the Keystone XL pipeline stacked in a yard near Oyen, Alberta, Canada. (Jason Franson/Bloomberg via Getty Images) © Provided by Yahoo! News Pipes for the Keystone XL pipeline stacked in a yard near Oyen, Alberta, Canada. (Jason Franson/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Biden’s decision in January to cancel the cross-border permit for the project was a final blow. “The Keystone XL pipeline disserves the U.S. national interest [..] Leaving the Keystone XL pipeline permit in place would not be consistent with my Administration’s economic and climate imperatives,” Biden announced in an executive order signed on his first day in office.

Keystone defeat energizes anti-pipeline activists

  Keystone defeat energizes anti-pipeline activists Anti-pipeline activists feel energized after the company behind the Keystone XL pipeline announced it would terminate the project following a more than decade-long battle.The news that the fight over that pipeline ended in victory for environmental and Native advocates left opponents of another major pipeline feeling optimistic.Keystone's termination came amid an intensifying fight over Enbridge's Line 3 pipeline, which likewise pits some indigenous and environmental groups against a Canadian firm."Activism is the only thing that works. If people don't get plugged in and step up and stand up, then they wouldn't even be talking about this on the news.

In addition to the pipeline’s generation of excessive carbon dioxide emissions, Keystone XL would have cut through the Ogallala Aquifer, a source of water for those living in the High Plains, which includes many Native American communities.

Opponents of the pipeline, including environmental activists and tribal leaders, celebrated TC Energy’s decision.

Larry Wright Jr., chairman of the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska, said in a Thursday statement: “On behalf of our Ponca Nation we welcome this long overdue news and thank all who worked so tirelessly to educate and fight to prevent this from coming to fruition. It's a great day for Mother Earth.”

In another statement, Fort Belknap Indian Community President Andy Werk said, “We were not willing to sacrifice our water or safety for the financial benefit of a trans-national corporation. We are thrilled that the project has been canceled."

Majority of $4.4 million cryptocurrency ransom payment in Colonial Pipeline hack recovered

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a group of people rowing a boat in the water: 'Kayaktivists', including Greenpeace's Charles Latimer (right) hold up a © Provided by Yahoo! News 'Kayaktivists', including Greenpeace's Charles Latimer (right) hold up a "Choose Water Not Pipeline" banner during a water-based "pipeline resistance training camp" in the San Juan Islands on August 26, 2017. (Tim Exton/AFP via Getty Images)

Former Vice President Al Gore joined the chorus of those applauding the pipeline’s demise, tweeting, “Congratulations to the Indigenous communities & activists who for a decade have said #NoKXL. We must continue to put the planet and its people ahead of polluters by saying no to #ByhaliaPipeline, #DAPL, #MVP, #Line3 & other reckless fossil fuel pipelines.”

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., also celebrated on Wednesday. “The Keystone XL pipeline was a giveaway to foreign oil lobbyists that put our communities, environment, and tribal lands at risk,” she tweeted. “I’m glad it’s dead, and I'm grateful to everyone who fought to make this day happen.”

For many Republicans, however, the pipeline was seen as a way to create much-needed energy sector jobs.

“President Biden killed the #KeystoneXL Pipeline & with it, thousands of good-paying American jobs,” Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., tweeted. “On Inauguration Day @POTUS signed an executive order that ended pipeline construction & handed 1000 workers pink slips. Now 10x that number of jobs will never be created.”

Minnesota court affirms approval of Line 3 oil pipeline

  Minnesota court affirms approval of Line 3 oil pipeline ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The Minnesota Court of Appeals on Monday affirmed state regulators' key approvals of Enbridge Energy’s Line 3 oil pipeline replacement project, in a dispute that drew over 1,000 protesters to northern Minnesota last week. A three-judge panel ruled 2-1 that the state’s independent Public Utilities Commission correctly granted Enbridge the certificate of need and route permit that the Canadian-based company needed to begin construction on the 337-mile (542-kilometer) Minnesota segment of a larger project to replace a 1960s-era crude oil pipeline that has been deteriorating and can run at only half capacity.

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, has repeatedly criticized Biden over his decision to revoke the permit for the pipeline.

“[Keystone XL] is a project that right now, today, has 1,200 good-paying union jobs. And in 2021, the Keystone pipeline was scheduled to have more than 11,000 jobs, including 8,000 union jobs, for contracts worth $1.6 billion,” Cruz said during a Senate hearing in January.

A 2014 State Department report dissected those numbers, revealing that out of the 11,000 jobs Cruz cited, only 35 to 50 jobs would have been permanent while the remaining would have been temporary construction jobs as the pipeline was being built.

In March, a coalition of attorney generals from 21 states sued the Biden administration for rescinding the pipeline’s permit. In their complaint, they said: “the pipeline would have a negligible impact on the climate but significant impact on the economy and American energy independence.”

a pile of snow: A depot used to store pipes for Transcanada Corp's planned Keystone XL oil pipeline is seen in Gascoyne, North Dakota, January 25, 2017. (Terray Sylvester/Reuters) © Provided by Yahoo! News A depot used to store pipes for Transcanada Corp's planned Keystone XL oil pipeline is seen in Gascoyne, North Dakota, January 25, 2017. (Terray Sylvester/Reuters)

As the 2022 midterm elections approach, Republican lawmakers have made clear that the demise of Keystone XL will resurface as an issue on which they will attempt, despite a robust economy, to pummell Democrats as job killers.

Blocked by Biden, Canadian company drops Keystone pipeline

  Blocked by Biden, Canadian company drops Keystone pipeline Blocked by US President Joe Biden, Canada's TC Energy said Wednesday it had officially terminated the Keystone XL Pipeline project, throwing in the towel on a controversial initiative opposed by environmental activists. © Daniel SLIM Activists in April displayed banners referring to the shutting down of existing oil pipelines in the northern United States at Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington TC Energy will coordinate with regulators, indigenous groups and other stakeholders "to meet its environmental and regulatory commitments and ensure a safe termination of and exit from the Project," the company said in

Many Republicans are also attempting to portray Biden as a hypocrite over his decision to ease sanctions on the Nord Stream 2 pipeline operated by a German citizen with close ties to Vladimir Putin.

“After facing insurmountable opposition, the company behind the Keystone Pipeline abandoned the project today,” House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy tweeted Wednesday. “Thousands of jobs destroyed and our energy independence jeopardized. Meanwhile, President Biden is meeting with Putin next week to tell him he can keep his pipeline.”

Alongside 10 senate Republicans, Sen. Jim Risch, R-Idaho, introduced the Defending Keystone Jobs Act, which would require the Biden administration to submit a report to Congress detailing the number of jobs lost as a result of the cancelled pipeline.

a sign on the side of a fence: A No Trespassing sign is visible at a Enbridge Energy pipeline drilling pad along a rail line that traces the Minnesota-Wisconsin border south of Jay Cooke State Park in Minnesota. (Jim Mone/AP Photo) © Provided by Yahoo! News A No Trespassing sign is visible at a Enbridge Energy pipeline drilling pad along a rail line that traces the Minnesota-Wisconsin border south of Jay Cooke State Park in Minnesota. (Jim Mone/AP Photo)

Despite the backlash from Republicans, the termination of the pipeline is a notable victory for those trying to hasten the U.S. transition away from fossil fuels and a model for the fights that lie ahead. Earlier this week, hundreds of activists from environmental and tribal groups blocked access to the site where the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline is being built in northern Minnesota. TC Energy’s withdrawal from Keystone XL has given hope to opponents.

“The termination of this zombie pipeline sets precedent for President Biden and polluters to stop Line 3, Dakota Access, and all fossil fuel projects,” Kendall Mackey, campaign manager of 350.org’s Keep It In The Ground campaign, said in a statement.

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