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Politics OnPolitics: Are infrastructure talks dead? Maybe not.

00:53  11 june  2021
00:53  11 june  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

Where do infrastructure talks go from here now that Biden's negotiations with Republicans collapsed?

  Where do infrastructure talks go from here now that Biden's negotiations with Republicans collapsed? As new infrastructure talks begin, old differences with Republicans have already emerged.Weeks of negotiations resulted in little headway, with major differences on costs and taxes going unreconciled. Republicans accused the president of changing his demands and being unwilling to compromise on his insistence on "social infrastructure" while the White House said the Republicans' offers didn't meet America's needs.

Earlier this week, President Joe Biden cut off negotiations for a bipartisan deal on infrastructure with a group of six Senate Republicans. Does that mean the deal is dead? Not necessarily.

Sens. Mark Warner, D-Va., Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., Mitt Romney, R-Utah,, Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., take a break from a meeting on infrastructure for going to a vote at the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday. © Alex Wong, Getty Images Sens. Mark Warner, D-Va., Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., Mitt Romney, R-Utah,, Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., take a break from a meeting on infrastructure for going to a vote at the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday.

Plus:

  • House Democrats are once again taking aim at Rep. Ilhan Omar's comments on Israel.
  • And in news environmentalists will love, the Keystone XL crude oil pipeline is canceled.

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After crafting $1.2 trillion infrastructure deal, bipartisan group of senators start lobbying White House, colleagues

  After crafting $1.2 trillion infrastructure deal, bipartisan group of senators start lobbying White House, colleagues The deal would not raise the corporate tax rate, which Biden had proposed. And it wouldn't hike the 18.4-cent federal per-gallon gas tax.The deal, reported by several media outlets and confirmed by a Senate source familiar with the deal, would focus on traditional transportation programs such as rail, bridges and waterways. It would not include "soft" infrastructure such as climate change and housing, which Biden had called for in his original $2.25 trillion American Jobs Act.

It's Mabinty, with the news of the day.

Infrastructure: 'Multiple paths forward'

Biden's administration isn't giving up on a bipartisan infrastructure deal after talks with Republican senators collapsed. Today, they expressed openness to a strategy from Senate Democrats to pass certain components of the measure without GOP support.

The White House claimed it still has "multiple paths forward" for getting an infrastructure bill passed, including:

  • Using a special legislative maneuver that doesn't require Republican backing
  • Building on a separate House Democratic proposal
  • Negotiating with a bipartisan group of senators who have been meeting for weeks on a compromise

Biden opened talks with the group of around 20 senators, include Sens. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, Rob Portman, R-Ohio, Bill Cassidy, R-La., Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz.

Biden, Capito to continue bipartisan infrastructure talks Friday

  Biden, Capito to continue bipartisan infrastructure talks Friday President Joe Biden will reconnect with Republican Sen. Shelley Moore Capito on Friday to further discuss a possible bipartisan compromise on an infrastructure bill. Your browser does not support this video The two met in the Oval Office for just over an hour Wednesday afternoon to talk about the $928 billion GOP infrastructure proposal unveiled last week, but announced no major breakthroughs on how they plan to bridge their still substantive differences.

If Biden doesn't reach an agreement, Democrats could choose to push through an infrastructure package using budget reconciliation, a legislative maneuver subject to certain rules that would allow the bill to pass with only a simple majority in the evenly divided Senate.

In essence, it would allow Democrats, who control the chamber by virtue of Vice President Kamala Harris' ability to break ties, to pass a proposal without any Republican support.

News you should be reading:

  • Trump State Department appointee Federico Klein offered plea deal in Capitol riot case
  • Biden, Boris Johnson talk COVID-19 travel rules, Atlantic Charter modeled on Churchill-FDR
  • Netanyahu is revered among American evangelicals. One pastor says his ouster will rupture the relationship
  • Biden's pick for appeals court, Ketanji Brown Jackson, clears Senate hurdle despite GOP opposition
  • Lack of party support and money, plus racism and sexism, mean Black women often lose statewide elections
  • State bar investigating Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton over Trump election lawsuit

Rep. Ilhan Omar v. fellow House Democrats

A group of House lawmakers is criticizing Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., for comparing the human rights records of the United States and Israel with Hamas and the Taliban — a rare public rebuke against a fellow Democrat.

America needs private investment — not public infrastructure

  America needs private investment — not public infrastructure The American economy would be better off if the whole deal was scrapped and more avenues for greater private investment in infrastructure were created while increasing our overall economic freedom by cutting taxes and lowering spending. Benjamin Powell, a senior fellow at the Independent Institute, Oakland, Calif., is director of the Free Market Institute and a professor of economics at Texas Tech University.

"Equating the United States and Israel to Hamas and the Taliban is as offensive as it is misguided," Illinois Rep. Brad Schneider and 11 other Democrats wrote in a joint statement issued late Wednesday.

The group was reacting to a tweet Omar posted Monday. "We must have the same level of accountability and justice for all victims of crimes against humanity," she tweeted. "We have seen unthinkable atrocities committed by the U.S., Hamas, Israel, Afghanistan, and the Taliban."

How's Omar responding? In an early Thursday tweet responding to her colleagues, Omar called it "shameful for colleagues who call me when they need my support to now put out a statement asking for 'clarification' and not just call."

Hope you have a restful weekend. —Mabinty

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: OnPolitics: Are infrastructure talks dead? Maybe not.

Biden-GOP spending talks hit critical juncture as patience runs thin .
President Biden will speak with Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) on Friday afternoon to discuss a potential bipartisan compromise on infrastructure amid signs the talks are nearing their end as both sides remain far apart on key components.Friday's discussion - slated to take place by phone instead of in-person like the previous meetings - comes as the clock is ticking for striking an agreement.Capito, the lead GOP negotiator, and Biden missed an informal Memorial Day deadline to clinch a deal. Democratic lawmakers, who start returning to Washington next week, are now eager to move forward on an infrastructure package, with or without Republicans.

usr: 1
This is interesting!