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Politics North Carolina legislature votes to ban abortion based on race, sex, Down syndrome diagnosis

01:00  11 june  2021
01:00  11 june  2021 Source:   thehill.com

Biden stays mum on state abortion laws with major test ahead for Roe

  Biden stays mum on state abortion laws with major test ahead for Roe As more Republican-led states pass abortion bans with the easing of the Covid-19 pandemic, a heated debate has returned to center stage with abortion rights supporters warning of a looming threat to access and anti-abortion activists determined to keep up the momentum. © Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images US President Joe Biden speaks about the May jobs report on June 4, 2021, at the Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, Convention Center. - The US economy added 559,000 jobs in May and the unemployment rate dipped to 5.8 percent, the Labor Department said on June 4, 2021, as Covid-19 vaccines helped businesses reopen and rehire.

The North Carolina legislature voted to ban abortion based on race, sex or Down syndrome diagnoses on Thursday.

a young boy sitting on a table: North Carolina legislature votes to ban abortion based on race, sex, Down syndrome diagnosis © Getty Images North Carolina legislature votes to ban abortion based on race, sex, Down syndrome diagnosis

The Senate bill passed on a party-line vote of 27-20, with all the Democrats rejecting the bill, The Associated Press reported.

The bill had earlier passed the House, where only six Democrats supported the measure.

The bill that will require doctors to get signed confirmation that a woman is not getting an abortion due to the race, sex or prenatal Down syndrome diagnosis.

The bill will now head to Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper who is likely to veto the legislation, AP noted.

States and localities must take bold and urgent actions to protect abortion access

  States and localities must take bold and urgent actions to protect abortion access Actions in the states to protect abortion access are not merely stopgaps — rather, they pave the way for nationwide change. States like Massachusetts set the stage for the Affordable Care Act; state-based organizing delivered Georgia's electoral college votes to the Biden-Harris ticket and two new U.S. Senators. Across this country, the vast majority of people want abortion to remain legal and accessible. We know this through polling and elections, and most importantly, we know it because people in every state access abortion care.

Even if the legislation were to go through, many abortion laws that have been passed in Republican states are currently being battled in court.

A federal appeals court recently blocked Missouri's abortion ban that prohibited abortions after eight weeks into the pregnancy.

Republicans supported the measure in North Carolina with state Sen. Joyce Krawiec (R) saying "Children should not have to pass a genetic test to earn the right to be born," according to AP.

She says the bill prevents "modern-day eugenics."

Sen. Sarah Crawford (D) opposed the bill and Republicans' description of it.

"This bill is not about the joy that people with disabilities bring to the world," Crawford said. "This bill is about controlling women. Simple as that."

"On the Divide" profiles three people at a Texas abortion clinic and asks: "What does choice mean?" .
Filmmakers spoke to Salon about shooting their documentary at the only abortion clinic in the Rio Grande Valley . Filmmakers Maya Cueva and Leah Galant show all sides of this hot-button issue in McAllen, Texas, as they follow Mercedes, a pro-life protester; Rey, a security guard at the clinic; and Denisse a volunteer escort and activist. Mercedes is a young woman who was involved in gang life. She was ready to abort her baby but changed her mind. She became a "prayer warrior," and loyal to Yolanda, a devout Christian woman who owns a pregnancy crisis center three doors down from the abortion clinic.

usr: 1
This is interesting!