•   
  •   
  •   

Politics DOJ charges six connected to pro-Trump rallies and right-wing revolutionary group in new Capitol riot conspiracy case

01:21  11 june  2021
01:21  11 june  2021 Source:   cnn.com

Liberals Need To Stop Whining About Merrick Garland Defending Trump

  Liberals Need To Stop Whining About Merrick Garland Defending Trump Some liberals are furious with Attorney General Merrick Garland as the Department of Justice defends laws that they oppose and individuals they abhor, including Donald Trump. Some of the criticisms arise from a misunderstanding of the foundational obligations of the DOJ to defend the laws of the United States—including those at odds with the policies of the current administration. That does not mean, however, that the DOJ under Garland should defend every position taken by the Trump-era Department, which was marked by mendacity and a disregard for the rule of law.

(CNN) Six men from California who allegedly organized themselves as a "DC Brigade," including one man who spoke at a right - wing rally in Washington, DC, the day before the January 6 attack on the US Capitol , face new conspiracy charges from the Justice Department , according to court documents made public on Thursday. The case adds to a pile of prosecutions that investigators have pursued alleging that groups of American extremists from far-right organizations like the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers worked together to plan the attack on Congress' certification of the presidential vote.

The DOJ charged six people in the Oath Keepers movement in connection with the Capitol riot . In an indictment released on Friday, the Department of Justice charged six additional defendants associated with the far- right Oath Keepers movement with conspiracy to obstruct Congress. The six new defendants have been added as codefendants to an existing case against three defendants, Jessica Watkins, Donovan Crowl, and Thomas Caldwell, alleging that Oath Keepers conspired to commit violence at the Capitol .

Six men from California who allegedly organized themselves as a "DC Brigade," including one man who spoke at a right-wing rally in Washington, DC, the day before the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, face new conspiracy charges from the Justice Department, according to court documents made public on Thursday.

a view of a city next to a window: WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: A crowd of Trump supporters gather outside as seen from inside the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Congress will hold a joint session today to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump. The joint session was disrupted as the Trump supporters breached the Capitol building. (Photo by Cheriss May/Getty Images) © Cheriss May/Getty Images WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: A crowd of Trump supporters gather outside as seen from inside the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Congress will hold a joint session today to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump. The joint session was disrupted as the Trump supporters breached the Capitol building. (Photo by Cheriss May/Getty Images)

The case adds to a pile of prosecutions that investigators have pursued alleging that groups of American extremists from far-right organizations like the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers worked together to plan the attack on Congress' certification of the presidential vote.

Why Biden's Justice Department Is Backing Trump-Era Positions

  Why Biden's Justice Department Is Backing Trump-Era Positions Why Biden's Justice Department Is Backing Trump-Era PositionsMeanwhile, some of the department’s other positions simply seem to run counter to the White House’s own agenda. The same day that President Joe Biden tweeted the Senate must pass the Equality Act and outlaw discrimination on the basis of gender orientation and sexual identity, news broke that the DOJ had written in a June 8 filing that it can “vigorously” defend the right of private religious schools to do just that.

The Department of Justice has arrested six additional people with ties to the far- right Oath Keepers militia group for their participation in the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, the agency announced Friday.Driving the news: A total of nine members of the group have been charged with coordinating the "The case against those affiliated with the Oath Keepers is the largest conspiracy case brought by the U.S. Justice Department so far in the Jan. 6 insurrection," AP writes.Get market news worthy of your time with Axios Markets. Subscribe for free.Details: The indictment alleges the defendants “did

WASHINGTON—Prosecutors filed conspiracy charges related to the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol Jan. A separate mob of pro - Trump supporters battled a thin line of police officers on the west entrance during the riot . The complaint is among the first to charge multiple alleged members of the mob with conspiracy in connection with the events of that day. Around eight to 10 people wearing helmets, reinforced vests and clothing with paraphernalia identifying themselves of the right - wing militia group Oath Keepers moved in a tactical fashion and forced their way to the front of the crowd, a video

This is the first case against multiple people said to be affiliated with the Three Percenters.

The alleged Three Percenter conspirators are: Alan Hostetter, of San Clemente, Russell Taylor, of Ladera Ranch, Erik Scott Warner of Menifee, Felipe Antonio "Tony" Martinez and Derek Kinnison, of Lake Elsinore, and Ronald Mele, of Temecula.

Kinnison had written in an encrypted app the group used for planning that he, Martinez and Warner took part in the Three Percenters militia, which prosecutors say supported an armed revolution.

Taylor, a speaker at a January 5 rally for then-President Donald Trump, is also accused of carrying a knife and telling the crowd during the January 6 siege to "move forward" and head "inside!"

In February, the FBI raided Hostetter's and Taylor's homes.

Trump cowboy seeks 2nd act in politics after Capitol breach

  Trump cowboy seeks 2nd act in politics after Capitol breach TULAROSA, N.M. (AP) — He rodeoed in a Buffalo Bill-style Wild West show, carried his message on horseback from the Holy Land to Times Square and was invited to the White House to meet the president. But luck may have run out for this cowboy pastor who rode to national political fame by embracing President Donald Trump with a series of horseback caravans and came crashing down with a defiant stand Jan. 6 against President Joe Biden’s election. Today, Couy Griffin is divorced, disparaged by family and confronts a political recall drive, a state corruption investigation and federal charges.And yet he remains determined. He sees himself as governor one day.

While most arrests in the Capitol riot have been individuals, new charges accused three people tied to a right - wing militia of conspiring to commit violence. At least 12 National Guard members have been removed from duties related to the inauguration, two of them for possible links to right - wing extremist movements, Defense Department officials said on Tuesday. Others arrested in the riots have been linked to the Oath Keepers, though they have not been accused of being part of an organized conspiracy .

DOJ has charged more than a dozen people in Wednesday’s Capitol riot . Two more men were charged in federal court in connection with Wednesday’s riot at the U.S. Capitol , the Justice Department announced Sunday, with the Counterterrorism Section of the DOJ ’s National Security Division helping take up the prosecution. Larry Rendell Brock, of Texas, faces one count of knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, and one count of violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

Hostetter had founded the American Phoenix Project to oppose pandemic restrictions in 2020, and worked with Taylor and an unnamed person later in the year to claim the election had been stolen from Trump, according to the indictment Thursday.

Hostetter and Taylor also co-sponsored the pro-Trump rally near the Supreme Court on January 5, one day before the attack, CNN previously reported.

Footage of the rally shows the men spewing militant vitriol: Hostetter told the crowd to prepare for "war tomorrow" against "vipers" in Congress who refused to nullify President Joe Biden's win. Taylor said, "We will not return to our peaceful way of life until this election is made right."

Leading up to January 6, Hostetter and Taylor booked rooms at the Kimpton George Hotel and had a Telegram chat they named "The California Patriots-Answer the Call Jan 6."

Another Telegram chat, used by all six defendants, said in its "about" section that it would serve as the communications for "able bodied individuals" who on January 6 were "willing to fight," according to the indictment.

Another of the indicted men, Ronald Mele, wrote on Facebook that he planned to bring "gear," and he stayed at a Courtyard Marriott in Washington, DC, prosecutors said.

Mele, Warner, Kinnison and Martinez planned a cross-country road trip to make it to the Trump rally, prosecutors said.

The four also discussed using earpieces connected to radios and stashing guns in their SUV, the indictment said.

CNN's requests for comment to Hostetter on Thursday went unanswered.

Dyke Huish, an attorney for Taylor, told CNN his client has not been arrested and that Taylor plans to self-report to authorities on Friday.

"Mr. Taylor intends to appear in court and intends to enter a not guilty plea," Huish said. "(The indictment) came as a surprise to us."

Justice surprises, dismays with Trump defense .
The Department of Justice's (DOJ) defense of former President Trump against a defamation suit stemming from a rape allegation has surprised and dismayed critics who had spoken out against the previous administration's use of government lawyers to represent him.On Monday night, the Justice Department filed a brief with a federal appeals court backing the Trump administration's argument that the former president's comments about the writer E. Jean Carroll were made in the context of his official duties and thus he should be represented by government lawyers.

usr: 1
This is interesting!