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Politics Mitch McConnell says 'highly unlikely' he would let Biden fill a Supreme Court vacancy in 2024 if GOP wins back Senate

21:20  14 june  2021
21:20  14 june  2021 Source:   cnn.com

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  Fact check: Breaking down Mitch McConnell's spin on the John Lewis voting rights bill Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell was asked Tuesday where he stands on the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, a Democratic bill that aims to prevent states from implementing racially discriminatory voting laws. © Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), joined by Senate Assistant Minority Leader John Thune (R-SD) (L) and Senate Minority Whip Roy Blunt (R-MO), speaks following a Senate Republican Policy luncheon at the Russell Senate Office Building on May 18, 2021 in Washington, DC.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said on Monday that if his party regains the majority in 2022 it's "highly unlikely" he would let President Joe Biden confirm a Supreme Court vacancy if one opened up in 2024, and was non-committal when asked about an opening at the end of 2023.

a man wearing a suit and tie holding a glass of wine: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) speaks to reporters following the weekly Republican policy luncheons on Capitol Hill on May 25, 2021 in Washington, DC. © Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) speaks to reporters following the weekly Republican policy luncheons on Capitol Hill on May 25, 2021 in Washington, DC.

"I think in the middle of a presidential election, if you have a Senate of the opposite party of the president, you have to go back to the 1880s to find the last time a vacancy was filled. So I think it's highly unlikely. In fact, no, I don't think either party if it controlled, if it were different from the president, would confirm a Supreme Court nominee in the middle of an election. What was different in 2020 was we were of the same party as the president," McConnell said on the Hugh Hewitt radio program Monday.

McConnell says it's 'highly unlikely' he'd let Biden fill a Supreme Court seat in 2024

  McConnell says it's 'highly unlikely' he'd let Biden fill a Supreme Court seat in 2024 McConnell, who previously blocked Obama from filling a court vacancy in 2016, told Hugh Hewitt he'd do the same to Biden.McConnell told conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt that if he were leading the Senate, it would be "highly unlikely" that he'd allow Biden to fill a seat if one came up in the last year of his presidency.

When asked what he would do if his party controlled the Senate and a seat opened up at the end of 2023, McConnell said: "Well, we'd have to wait and see what happens."

The comments from the top Senate Republican are likely to trigger the ire of Democrats who have been intensely critical of McConnell's handling of the Supreme Court confirmation process in the past and have accused Republicans of obstruction and hypocrisy over the issue.

It also comes as pressure as progressives and some Democrats increasingly signal they hope to see Justice Stephen Breyer retire in order to pave the way for Biden to make a nomination to the high court. Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez told CNN's Dana Bash on "State of the Union" Sunday "it's something I think about, but I would probably lean towards yes," when asked if Breyer should retire at the end of this Supreme Court term.

McConnell Says 'Highly Unlikely' GOP Majority Selects Biden SCOTUS Pick in 2024 As Liberals Push Breyer Retirement

  McConnell Says 'Highly Unlikely' GOP Majority Selects Biden SCOTUS Pick in 2024 As Liberals Push Breyer Retirement "Well, we'd have to wait and see what happens," McConnell said when asked if a GOP-controlled Senate would advance a Biden Supreme Court pick in 2023.Speaking to conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt, McConnell said it would be "highly unlikely" that a Republican-led Senate would allow Biden to put a new justice on the high court in 2024—the year the next presidential race will take place.

McConnell and Senate Republicans famously refused to consider the Supreme Court nomination of Merrick Garland by then-President Barack Obama in 2016, a presidential election year, after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia.

After former President Donald Trump won the White House and was sworn into office, he nominated Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court and the GOP-controlled Senate confirmed the nomination.

But in 2020, another presidential election year, McConnell and Senate Republicans took up and confirmed the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, Trump's pick to fill the vacancy created by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

McConnell claims that 2020 was different than 2016 because Republicans had control of the Senate and there was a Republican in the White House, whereas when a vacancy arose in 2016, Obama was president while Republicans held the Senate.

But Senate Republicans rarely made that argument in 2016, instead focusing on making a broader argument that voters should get to decide the direction of the Supreme Court with the country on the verge of electing a new president.

Reflecting on his moves to usher in the confirmation of high court justices while Trump was in office, McConnell told Hewitt on Monday, "I do think the issue that you raised is the single most consequential thing I've done in my time as majority leader of the Senate. I preserved the Scalia vacancy, the Gorsuch appointment ... and of course we had very little time left when Justice Ginsburg passed away. That took a good deal of priority and skill to get Amy Coney Barrett through. I think we'll find out what a difference it makes to the American people."

After Supreme Court warning, Democratic candidates choose to ‘Make it about McConnell’ .
WASHINGTON — Minutes after Mitch McConnell threatened to hold yet another Supreme Court seat open if he reclaims the role of Senate Majority Leader, Democratic candidates aspiring to join the body jumped on the warning as a rallying cry for their candidacies. “Let’s make damn sure he’s not,” tweeted John Fetterman, one of the leading candidates to replace retiring GOP Sen. Pat Toomey in Pennsylvania. A donation link to his campaign website accompanied the retort. “Folks, we need to expand our Senate majority to stop Mitch McConnell.

usr: 0
This is interesting!