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Politics Portland officer indicted over alleged assault during George Floyd protest

21:30  16 june  2021
21:30  16 june  2021 Source:   thehill.com

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A grand jury indicted a Portland , Oregon, police officer on an assault charge for what prosecutors allege was an "excessive and unlawful use of force" during a protest last summer. Portland Police Bureau Officer Corey Budworth was indicted Tuesday with one count of fourth-degree assault , a misdemeanor, stemming from the August 2020 incident, the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office said. Budworth, who at the time was on the bureau's Rapid Response Team, which does crowd control, is accused of striking a woman in the head with a baton during the Aug.

budworth Portland Police Officer Corey Budworth, second from left. (Doug Brown) (DOUG BROWN). By Tess Riski. June 15, 2021 at 2:40 pm PDT. For the first time in Portland history, a Multnomah County grand jury has indicted a police officer for alleged excessive use of force during a protest . The Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office on Tuesday announced the indictment of Portland Police Officer Corey Budworth on one count of fourth-degree assault for “unlawfully caus[ing] physical injury to another person” during an Aug. 18, 2020, protest . At the time of the incident, which occurred

A Portland police officer was indicted over an alleged assault during a protest in the wake of George Floyd's murder last year, according to the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office.

a group of people standing in a parking lot: Portland officer indicted over alleged assault during George Floyd protest © Getty Images Portland officer indicted over alleged assault during George Floyd protest

MCDA issued a statement on Tuesday saying that a grand jury had indicted former Portland Police Bureau officer Corey Budworth for his role in a confrontation with protesters.

Budworth is accused of striking a woman in the head during a protest last August.

The Portland Police Association issued a statement defending Budworth's tactics, saying that he accidentally struck the woman, identified as Teri Jacobs, on the head and added that he was "caught in the crossfire of agenda-driven city leaders and a politicized criminal justice system."

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Our city experienced over 170 days of protests following the murder of George Floyd , and I also want to acknowledge that our officers faced great risk and protected our city in extreme conditions.” Budworth’s prosecution marks only the second time in county history a grand jury has returned criminal charges against a Portland officer for striking or firing at someone while on duty. In November 2011, a county grand jury indicted Portland Officer Dane Reister on third-degree assault and fourth-degree assault charges after he mistakenly loaded a beanbag shotgun with lethal shotgun rounds and

A Portland police officer was indicted by a grand jury for allegedly using a baton on a freelance photojournalist during a riot on August 18, 2020. Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt said Tuesday PPB Officer Corey Budworth was indicted for one count of 4th-degree assault for the incident that happened that night in Southeast Portland . The charge is a misdemeanor. The indictment spurred quick reaction from city leaders and union officials.

"He faced a violent and chaotic, rapidly evolving situation, and he used the lowest level of baton force-a push; not a strike or a jab-to remove Ms. Jacobs from the area," PPA said in their statement.

Budworth, who worked on the department's Rapid Response Team, was charged with one count of Assault in the Fourth Degree.

Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt said in a statement that Budworth's actions on that day were unlawful.

"But when that line is crossed, and a police officer's use of force is excessive and lacks a justification under the law, the integrity of our criminal justice system requires that we, as prosecutors, act as a mechanism for accountability," Schmidt said.

The city of Portland has been the center of civil unrest between the community and police since the killing of the 46-year-old Floyd last May by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, who was convicted in April. Floyd's death sparked a social justice and police reform movement across the country and in other parts of the world as well.

Judge acknowledges Floyd family pain, sentences Chauvin .
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Judge Peter Cahill told George Floyd's family members that “I acknowledge and hear the pain that you’re feeling” before sentencing a former Minneapolis police officer to 22 1/2 years in prison for murder. Cahill didn’t speak at length during Derek Chauvin’s sentencing hearing Friday, but instead issued a 22-page memorandum explaining his rationale for the sentence. He said it was “not the appropriate time” to be “profound or clever.” His sentence was 10 years above the presumptive penalty under state sentencing guidelines.

usr: 1
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