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Politics Biden, Putin agree to launch new dialogue on arms control

23:01  16 june  2021
23:01  16 june  2021 Source:   thehill.com

Biden likely to come out of Putin summit empty-handed and risks handing the Kremlin a victory, former US officials warn

  Biden likely to come out of Putin summit empty-handed and risks handing the Kremlin a victory, former US officials warn "If there aren't clear deliverables criticism will grow that this high-level meeting ultimately benefited the Kremlin," a former US official said.Relations between the US and Russia have been deteriorating for years, and Washington has struggled to come up with an effective response to Putin's increasingly aggressive behavior both at home and abroad. Experts warn that Putin has no intention of using the meeting to improve relations, and question what Biden has to gain via the summit.

President Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin released a joint statement following their summit Wednesday agreeing to resume a dialogue on strategic stability on nuclear arms control.

Joe Biden wearing a suit and tie: Biden, Putin agree to launch new dialogue on arms control © Getty Biden, Putin agree to launch new dialogue on arms control

The decision to begin the new dialogue is one of the few concrete deliverables emerging from the three-hour summit between Biden and Putin in Geneva, Switzerland, their first face-to-face meeting since Biden took office in January.

The meeting also touched on topics of contention, like Russian cyberattacks and the Kremlin's poisoning and jailing of opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

Biden, unlike predecessors, has maintained Putin skepticism

  Biden, unlike predecessors, has maintained Putin skepticism President Joe Biden frequently talks about what he sees as central in executing effective foreign policy: building personal relationships. © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this March 10, 2011 file photo, then U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, left, shakes hands with Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin in Moscow.

"We, President of the United States of America Joseph R. Biden and President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin, note the United States and Russia have demonstrated that, even in periods of tension, they are able to make progress on our shared goals of ensuring predictability in the strategic sphere, reducing the risk of armed conflicts and the threat of nuclear war," the joint statement issued by the White House reads.

"The recent extension of the New START Treaty exemplifies our commitment to nuclear arms control. Today, we reaffirm the principle that a nuclear war cannot be won and must never be fought," it continues. "Consistent with these goals, the United States and Russia will embark together on an integrated bilateral Strategic Stability Dialogue in the near future that will be deliberate and robust."

Putin talks hacking, Navalny and Capitol riot in NBC interview ahead of Biden summit

  Putin talks hacking, Navalny and Capitol riot in NBC interview ahead of Biden summit In an exclusive interview, Putin again denied that Russian hackers or the government itself were behind cyberattacks in the U.S. were "farcical," and he challenged NBC News, and by implication the U.S. government, to produce proof that Russians were involved."We have been accused of all kinds of things," Putin said. "Election interference, cyberattacks and so on and so forth. And not once, not once, not one time, did they bother to produce any kind of evidence or proof. Just unfounded accusations.

The U.S. and Russia intend to use the dialogue to "lay the groundwork for future arms control and risk reduction measures," the statement says.

The Biden administration and Russia reached a deal in February shortly after Biden took office to extend New START, currently the only nuclear arms treaty between both countries, for five years.

Biden highlighted arms control as an area where both countries could find common ground during a press conference following the summit Wednesday.

He said he accomplished his three objectives for the summit: identifying areas of mutual interest, communicating that the U.S. would respond to actions that impair its interests or those of its allies, and laying out U.S. values.

"It was important to meet in person so there could be no mistake about or misrepresentations about what I wanted to communicate," Biden told reporters. "I did what I came to do."

While Biden and Putin made some progress on arms control, it was clear following the summit that tensions persist between both countries on cyberattacks and human rights issues.

Biden described the meeting as constructive but said it would take time to determine whether it yielded any positive results.

"We'll find out within the next six months to a year whether or not we actually have a strategic dialogue that matters," Biden said.

Biden is playing a long game with Putin. Will it work?: ANALYSIS .
After their summit this week, President Joe Biden said he is playing a long game with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Will it work?: ANALYSIS. After their afternoon summit in the Swiss capital, Biden said give him time to see if his approach works -- trying to play to Putin's long desire to have Moscow seen as a key power, respected and feared around the globe.

usr: 0
This is interesting!