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Politics Andrew Yang Polls Look Bleak As Eric Adams Favorite to Win NY Primary

19:10  18 june  2021
19:10  18 june  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

New York City's mayoral race is all about police, crime. Will Ocasio-Cortez endorsement give progressives a boost?

  New York City's mayoral race is all about police, crime. Will Ocasio-Cortez endorsement give progressives a boost? Maya Wiley has won the backing of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in the New York City mayoral race. Will it be enough for a liberal to win?Wiley received her highest profile endorsement over the weekend from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., a stalwart of self-described "progressive" politics.

New York City mayoral candidate Andrew Yang is facing a bleak outlook ahead of Tuesday's Democratic primary after a number of polls suggested his campaign would end in defeat.

a man wearing a suit and tie: Democratic mayoral candidate Andrew Yang speaks to voters during a campaign rally June 13, 2021 in New York, New York. Yang has seen a steep decline in support in recent polls. © Alex Wong/Getty Images Democratic mayoral candidate Andrew Yang speaks to voters during a campaign rally June 13, 2021 in New York, New York. Yang has seen a steep decline in support in recent polls.

A New York Post poll of likely primary voters, published on Friday, placed Yang fourth, with Brooklyn borough president and former NYPD officer Eric Adams leading the field.

The primary will use a ranked-choice system, allowing voters to rank the candidates based on their preference. As a result, vote counting will take some time and the final results may not be known on Tuesday.

Key Moments From the Final NYC Mayoral Debate

  Key Moments From the Final NYC Mayoral Debate The candidates made their case for mayor one last time — which often boiled down to critiquing Eric Adams and Andrew Yang.In one of the first discussions of policing and public safety — the dominant issue of the primary for months now — moderators asked Andrew Yang why he would be the best candidate to counter an uptick in violent crime. Yang responded by citing his endorsement on Monday from the Captains Endowment Association, one of four unions representing the New York Police Department and one that represented Adams during part of his career. “The people you should ask about this are his colleagues,” Yang said, referring to Eric Adams’s status as a former cop.

The NY Post poll, in conjunction with McLaughlin & Associates, surveyed 1,000 likely Democratic voters between June 10 and 15.

Adams was the first choice for 21.3 percent of respondents, followed by Maya Wiley on 16.5 percent and Kathryn Garcia on 16.2 percent.

Yang was a distant fourth, with just 9.6 percent of respondents picking the former presidential candidate.

When asked about their second-choice candidate, 12.4 percent opted for Garcia, former commissioner of the city's Department of Sanitation. Wiley, former counsel to Mayor Bill De Blasio, followed with 11.5 percent. Adams was third with 11.4 percent and Yang was joint fourth along with New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

Yang was initially considered a frontrunner in the Democratic race but Friday's poll is just the latest survey to show him trailing his rivals.

Top NYC mayoral contenders trade barbs as race enters homestretch

  Top NYC mayoral contenders trade barbs as race enters homestretch Brooklyn Borough President Adams remains the race’s frontrunner in recent polls, but Garcia, the city’s former sanitation commisioner; Yang, a tech entrepreneur; and Wiley, Mayor de Blasio’s former legal counsel, continue to be within striking distance. Adams, a former NYPD captain, went on the offensive early Friday.He made his case on Hot 97 radio and at an anti-violence rally in Harlem, where he announced the endorsement of Leandra Feliz, the mother of 15-year-old Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, whose murder in the Bronx rocked the city three years ago.

A WNBC/Telemundo 47/POLITICO/Marist poll of 876 likely Democratic voters, conducted from June 3 to 9, found that 24 percent of respondents picked Adams as their first choice, followed by Garcia on 17 percent and Wiley on 15 percent. Yang came fourth on 13 percent.

That poll simulated the ranked-choice voting system and suggested Yang would be eliminated in the 10th round, having garnered just 19 percent of the vote. It found that Adams would defeat Garcia in the 12th round by a margin of 12 percentage points.

A poll from PIX11/Emerson College taken between June 7 and 8 among 1,162 registered voters gave Adams 23 percent of first-choice votes, followed by Wiley on 17 percent, Yang on 15 percent and Garcia on 12 percent.

The simulated ballot showed Adams winning over Wiley in the 11th round with 58.5 percent to her 41.5 percent. Yang was eliminated in the 10th round with 27.2 percent.

What NYC Will Teach Us About Ranked-Choice Voting

  What NYC Will Teach Us About Ranked-Choice Voting As Election Day approaches in New York City's mayoral primaries, former sanitation commissioner Kathryn Garcia and former presidential candidate Andrew Yang are campaigning together (though, while Yang encouraged his supporters to also cast a ranked-choice vote for Garcia, she did not reciprocate); former Wall Street executive Ray McGuire explored a similar alliance with Garcia, then backed off; former mayoral counsel Maya Wiley claims to have snubbed an offer to join Garcia and Yang on the trail (though Garcia and Yang deny it); and the polling leader, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, is shunning all alliances and gleefully attacking most everyone else.

This presents a stark contrast to a PIX11/Emerson College poll conducted in early March, when Yang enjoyed 32 percent support while Adams had 19 percent and Wiley 9 percent.

In May, a Spectrum News NY1/ IPSOS poll found Adams had jumped ahead of Yang. The survey of 906 likely Democratic voters, conducted from May 17 to 31, gave Adams 22 percent of first-choice votes to Yang's 16 percent.

When contacted for comment, the Yang campaign pointed Newsweek to internal polling of New Yorkers who have already cast their ballots in early voting. That shows Yang with a slight edge in first-choice votes, winning 20 percent to Adams' 19 percent, with Garcia and Stringer on 9 percent and Wiley on just 8 percent.

Evan Thies, a spokesperson for the Adams campaign, told Newsweek in a statement on Friday: "Poll after poll, day after day, voters are saying the same thing: Eric Adams is our choice for mayor because he is a blue-collar New Yorker like us with the experience, the vision, and the determination to deliver a safer, fairer and more affordable city for all of us."

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Eric Adams is leading, but the race for New York City mayor isn't decided. Here's what we know. .
Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams is ahead in the New York City mayoral race, but it's still undecided with absentee votes and ranked choice.It may take several weeks to find out who won the Democratic primary for mayor, with absentee ballots still trickling in and a new ranked choice voting system allowing New Yorkers to list their top five preferences for mayor.

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