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Politics New York City's slow-motion primary election will force the press to show some patience

06:40  22 june  2021
06:40  22 june  2021 Source:   cnn.com

'New York is back!' The NYC Democratic mayoral primary captivates a reanimated city

  'New York is back!' The NYC Democratic mayoral primary captivates a reanimated city When New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez took the stage at a rally for New York City mayoral candidate Maya Wiley on Saturday night, the congresswoman paused a beat and took in the scene. © Lev Radin/Pacific Press/ZUMA Wire New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez endorses Maya Wiley for New York City mayor earlier this month.

New York City is about to become the largest American jurisdiction to implement ranked choice voting for an election . It' s complicated, it' s confusing, and it' s going to take a while for the press and the public to know the outcome. Do you think everyone involved will be able to summon a sufficient amount of patience ?

New York City holds its mayoral primary Tuesday. Here's what you need to know. A polling site is seen as early voting in New York City ' s mayoral primary election has started as of Saturday which voters can Some progressives across the country, including influential Rep. Ray McGuire, a NYC mayoral candidate, speaks during a press conference where Asian American leaders and candidates

A version of this article first appeared in the "Reliable Sources" newsletter. You can sign up for free right here.

An election worker answers questions on a ranked choice voting ballot during early voting in the primary election, Monday, June 14, 2021, at the Church of St. Anthony of Padua in the Soho neighborhood of New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) © Mary Altaffer/AP An election worker answers questions on a ranked choice voting ballot during early voting in the primary election, Monday, June 14, 2021, at the Church of St. Anthony of Padua in the Soho neighborhood of New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

New York City is about to become the largest American jurisdiction to implement ranked choice voting for an election. It's complicated, it's confusing, and it's going to take a while for the press and the public to know the outcome. Do you think everyone involved will be able to summon a sufficient amount of patience?

A woman has never been elected mayor of New York City. Will one of these women change that?

  A woman has never been elected mayor of New York City. Will one of these women change that? New York City has never elected a woman as mayor. Three candidates, Kathryn Garcia, Maya Wiley and Dianne Morales, could change that.In a mayoral race centering on policing, public safety and New York's recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, the possibility of the first female mayor has only grown as the race narrows.

(CNN) New York was called early on election night for President- elect Joe Biden, but if the Empire State had been a presidential battleground, the drama that gripped the country for a few days might now be stretching into its third week. In New York , there is less patience -- and more confusion. That some races centered in New York City remain undecided is not much of a surprise. The city ' s Board of Elections is notoriously cumbersome and disorganized. And the state's decision to allow for early and expanded absentee voting put added pressure on an already strained apparatus.

The New York City primary election is this Tuesday, but it could be weeks before we find out who won the top contest — the Democratic primary for mayor. Given the electoral makeup of the city , the winner of that contest is highly likely to be elected mayor in November. If turnout is low, that could help a candidate like Eric Adams, the Brooklyn borough president, who has support from unions and party leaders who are highly likely to show up at the polls. The campaigns will also examine the gap between the top two candidates and whether the person in first place on primary night is winning by a

Voting locations open at 6am Tuesday. The highest-profile race is the Democratic primary for mayor. "I've been watching NYC mayoral elections for nearly 30 years," CNN Politics senior writer and analyst Harry Enten says. "And I have never lacked this much confidence in predicting the winner on primary eve."

The final polls "indicated that Eric Adams, Kathryn Garcia, Maya Wiley and Andrew Yang are all within 10 points of each other in initial preferences," Enten told me. "Adams does lead, but he has the lowest share of initial primary preferences in over 40 years."

To understand the ranked choice voting process, check out Enten's explainer here. "Again, most polling has Adams coming out on top in this process, but not all of it," Enten said. "With Yang (whose voters were most likely to back Adams) signaling his preference for Garcia over the weekend instead, how might that change the equation? Oh, and we might not know who has won until the week of July 12 because of when absentee ballots are arriving, and because of the ranked choice process." About that...

‘Potential crisis for democracy’: Threats to election workers could spur mass retirements

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The New York City mayor’ s race began in the throes of a pandemic, in a shuttered city convulsed by a public health catastrophe, economic devastation and widespread protests over police brutality. Now, with voters heading to the primary polls on Tuesday, New York finds itself in a very different place. The primary election marks the end of an extraordinary chapter in New York ’ s history and the start of another, an inflection point that will play a defining role in shaping the post-pandemic future of the city .

New York City police officers clearing a subway train of passengers at the Coney Island station in Brooklyn last year.Credit Corey Sipkin/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images. Ideally, the next mayor will blend both of their approaches. A Mayor Adams would have to take seriously the public’ s demand to fundamentally It now falls to Black Democrats to show up and vote in big numbers in this primary election to resolve a debate where they have the most at stake, and offer judgments on two candidates who understand the issue and whose decisions as mayor would resonate beyond the five boroughs.

The news abhors a vacuum

"On Tuesday night," the NYT's Emma G. Fitzsimmons wrote, "we should find out which candidate is leading among the ballots cast in-person on Primary Day and during nine days of early voting. But election officials must then wait for tens of thousands of absentee ballots to arrive, and those will need to be counted as well."

For those reasons, "an official winner is unlikely to be named before the week of July 12," she wrote. Hopefully it'll happen sooner, but it could take even longer. As Tim Miller wrote, maybe "the next mayor can fix" this broken election system.

In the meantime, the local media's role is crucial here, in the same way that the national media's role was critical last November. One candidate may emerge with a sizable lead, making it very tough for others to catch up, but that won't be enough to "call" the Democratic primary race. So pack your patience...

The inside story of how Bill de Blasio promised, then thwarted NYPD accountability

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New York City currently allows limited indoor dining. The mayor said on Monday that it was time to re-evaluate that rule.Credit Desiree Rios for The New York Times. New York had already been contending with localized spikes in some neighborhoods, including those with many ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents, leading Mr. Cuomo and Mr. de Blasio to adopt new restrictions in those areas. But given the course of the outbreak nationally, it was not entirely clear whether the broader increases across the city could be traced to those neighborhoods.

In New York , officials canceled the state’ s Democratic presidential primary , but a federal judge ordered that the election be held in June. Fifteen other states have rescheduled their contests because of the coronavirus. An early voting site in Cleveland on March 13. Ohio’ s governor postponed the state’ s March 17 “Like other states have done, all the primary elections will be postponed until June, which gives everyone time to prepare,” Mr. Hogan said. “Free and fair elections are the very foundation of American democracy, and while there are many valid reasons for unease and uncertainty right now

FOR THE RECORD

-- "A Democratic mayoral primary that mostly played out in the tiny confines of a square box on Zoom spun into full Technicolor berserk in the race's final days," David Freedlander observes... (NYMag)

-- Henry Goldman writes: "NYC mayoral race shows city at odds over how to mount comeback..." (Bloomberg)

-- Andrea Gabor examined how the NYT tried, and failed, to corroborate a harassment allegation against candidate Scott Stringer. When Stringer's accuser went public at a press conference, the charges received widespread coverage. Stringer is now an also-ran... (CJR)

-- A timely big-picture story by Alex Burns and Jonathan Martin: "When it comes to big city elections, Republicans are in the wilderness..." (NYT)

"I love you New York"

That's how Maya Wiley, the former MSNBC commentator, closed her final rally: "I love you New York." The Democratic primary race is certainly getting lots of attention -- in part because of what this race signals about the Democratic party writ large -- and in part because there aren't a lot of other big-deal elections this year.

NY lifts more COVID-19 rules as it hits vaccination mark

  NY lifts more COVID-19 rules as it hits vaccination mark Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Tuesday that 70% of adults in New York have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine, a threshold he said the state would celebrate by easing many of its remaining social distancing rules and shooting off fireworks. “What does 70% mean? It means that we can now return to life as we know it,” Cuomo told an invitation-only crowd at the World Trade Center in Manhattan. Effective immediately, he said, the state is lifting rules that required many types of businesses to follow cleaning protocols or take people's temperatures or screen them for recent COVID-19 symptoms.Movie theaters will no longer have to leave empty seats between patrons.

And there's this, as Peter Hamby tweeted on Monday: "New York media has a habit of wildly overestimating how much the country cares about the mayor's race." But here's the counterargument, from the aforementioned Tim Miller: The race "has been so fun." One of the examples he cited: The brouhaha about whether Eric Adams actually lives in New Jersey.

Adams was asked about the "elephant in the room" in this Q&A with VF's Bess Levin. Adams said, "Those people on Twitter, I just keep it moving and ignore them... They can tweet all they want; that's a whole universe that lives among itself. [But] there's a real-world that is not on Twitter. And so I could care less what they write, what they say."

Don't be swayed by Twitter chatter

Building on some recent tweets by Brian Riedl of the Manhattan Institute, Bobby Burack of Outkick wrote about the misleading nature of Twitter chatter on Monday. "Pew data finds that 3% of the population creates 90% of all tweets sent," he wrote. "Only 8% of the US population is 'active' on Twitter." And yet, Burack wrote, "late-night TV, award shows, and comedy have adjusted content to correspond with Twitter reaction. Appealing to just 8% of viewers is bad business."

Lin-Manuel Miranda's recent apology might come to mind. "Stop the apologizing," Bill Maher said on HBO last weekend. "You're the guy who made the founding fathers Black and Hispanic! I don't think you have to apologize to Twitter."

>> Counterargument: This thoughtful NYT conversation explores the issues about colorism "and the casting of the film..."

Eric Adams is leading, but the race for New York City mayor isn't decided. Here's what we know. .
Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams is ahead in the New York City mayoral race, but it's still undecided with absentee votes and ranked choice.It may take several weeks to find out who won the Democratic primary for mayor, with absentee ballots still trickling in and a new ranked choice voting system allowing New Yorkers to list their top five preferences for mayor.

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