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Politics Eric Adams is leading, but the race for New York City mayor isn't decided. Here's what we know.

14:06  23 june  2021
14:06  23 june  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

'New York is back!' The NYC Democratic mayoral primary captivates a reanimated city

  'New York is back!' The NYC Democratic mayoral primary captivates a reanimated city When New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez took the stage at a rally for New York City mayoral candidate Maya Wiley on Saturday night, the congresswoman paused a beat and took in the scene. © Lev Radin/Pacific Press/ZUMA Wire New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez endorses Maya Wiley for New York City mayor earlier this month.

NEW YORK – Eric Adams, the Brooklyn Borough president and former police captain, is waking up Wednesday in the lead to be New York City's next mayor, but even though voting is done, the race is far from over.

It may take several weeks to find out who won the Democratic primary for mayor, with absentee ballots still trickling in and a new ranked choice voting system allowing New Yorkers to list their top five preferences for mayor.

Eric Adams et al. around each other: Democratic mayoral candidate Eric Adams speaks at his primary night election party, Tuesday, June 22, 2021, in New York. © Kevin Hagen, AP Democratic mayoral candidate Eric Adams speaks at his primary night election party, Tuesday, June 22, 2021, in New York.

No candidate won an outright majority in the election Tuesday, so the ranked choice preferences of voters will now be redistributed as the candidates with the fewest number of votes are eliminated in a series of rounds.

Ranked-choice voting, explained

  Ranked-choice voting, explained The hidden politics of New York City’s new system.Registered Democratic voters in New York City are getting that opportunity. Their mayoral primary on June 22 will be the city’s first to use ranked-choice voting — and that race will be the biggest spotlight yet for this system in the United States.

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Meanwhile, one-time front runner Andrew Yang conceded the race Tuesday night after initial results had him in fourth. "I am not going to be the next mayor of New York City," he said.

The city's Board of Elections is expected to release the first batch of ranked choice votes next Tuesday, calculating only the preferences of early and in-person voters.

New York City mayoral race: What to know about the candidates, issues and why a 'progressive' isn't leading the way

After the counting of absentee ballots begins, the next round of ranked choice preferences, including those mail-in votes, is expected to be released July 6.

Common Cause/NY, an advocacy group that supports the ranked choice system, said it's likely that complete results won't be known until July 12.

Top NYC mayoral contenders trade barbs as race enters homestretch

  Top NYC mayoral contenders trade barbs as race enters homestretch Brooklyn Borough President Adams remains the race’s frontrunner in recent polls, but Garcia, the city’s former sanitation commisioner; Yang, a tech entrepreneur; and Wiley, Mayor de Blasio’s former legal counsel, continue to be within striking distance. Adams, a former NYPD captain, went on the offensive early Friday.He made his case on Hot 97 radio and at an anti-violence rally in Harlem, where he announced the endorsement of Leandra Feliz, the mother of 15-year-old Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, whose murder in the Bronx rocked the city three years ago.

"Democracy takes time, and every vote counts. Accurate and fair election results are worth waiting for," Susan Lerner, the group's executive director, said in a statement.

How does ranked choice voting work? And why does New York City have it?

Democratic voters could select their top five preferences for mayor out of a crowded field that featured eight major candidates.

If one person had won a majority in the first round, they'd win the nomination. Since that didn't happen, the candidate with the fewest first choice votes is eliminated, and the preferences of the ballots listing them as first are redistributed. The process continues until two candidates are left, and the person with the most votes wins.

Ranked choice systems have been used in other cities, such as Oakland, California, and Cambridge, Massachusetts. The change in New York is due to a 2019 ballot initiative to enact ranked voting for primaries and special elections.

Opinion: Seven things to know about NYC mayoral race

  Opinion: Seven things to know about NYC mayoral race Errol Louis writes that the fiercely contested Democratic primary for mayor of New York City is the most consequential election in years. The most pressing issues of this race will likely resonate beyond the city and have the potential of setting the agenda of the Democratic Party.The race offers a window into issues of crime, race, social justice and economic inequality that will resonate well beyond the confines of the city and could end up setting the agenda of a Democratic Party seeking to satisfy and expand its restive, politically potent urban base. Furthermore, winning the Democratic primary normally spells victory in November given the city's political makeup.

Advocates say ranked voting better captures voters' preferences and can be less costly than runoff elections. It's also believed to lead to less nasty campaigning and more alliances, though the New York City race featured plenty of jabs and few candidates cross-endorsing.

NYC has never elected a woman as mayor: Will one of these women change that?

But the process has been criticized as being confusing to some voters, who may not rank five candidates, leading to their ballots being "exhausted" if all of their preferences are eliminated.

"It's our first time. We have no experience, no major cities like us have had any experience in this," said Sid Davidoff, a senior adviser to former Mayor John Lindsay. "That'll be the conversation. More than who's elected mayor, how they got elected will be the conversation after it's over."

Who is Eric Adams? And who are the other NYC mayoral candidates?

Adams commanded 31.7% of voters' first choice preferences in the results released from Tuesday and early voting. Maya Wiley, the former counsel to Mayor Bill de Blasio, was in second with 22.2%. Former sanitation department head Kathryn Garcia had 19.5% in third. And Yang, the entrepreneur riding the momentum of his 2020 presidential run into the mayor's race, sat in fourth with 11.7%.

New York City holds its mayoral primary Tuesday. Here's what you need to know

  New York City holds its mayoral primary Tuesday. Here's what you need to know The race to replace New York Mayor Bill de Blasio will cross a key threshold on Tuesday as Democrats and Republicans host their primary elections. Given Democrats' dominance in city politics, that party's primary is being closely watched, as it will likely determine who will lead the nation's largest city out of more than a year of pandemic-induced shutdowns While the early focus of the race was on Andrew Yang, the nationally recognizable former presidential candidate, recent polls have shown that the contest is wide open.

Adams made public safety his campaign's central message at a time when the city has seen an uptick in crime. He's also been an advocate for police reform in the past and promised to address racial inequities in the city.

Born in Brooklyn and raised in Queens, Adams as a teen was beaten while in police custody, sparking his desire to become a police officer and chance the department from within.

Though briefly registered as a Republican in the 1990s, Adams was first elected to New York State Senate in 2006. He became Brooklyn Borough President in 2013. He would be the city's second Black mayor.

Adams faced criticism on the campaign trail after a POLITICO report detailed discrepancies in his campaign and real estate records. Opponents accused him of misusing his government office building as a campaign office and actually living in New Jersey, which Adams both denied.

His primary rival during the race was Yang, whom the day before the election Adams called a "fraud" and "liar."

Yang was seen as the race's front runner for months, but started to lag in polling in the past several weeks. He also made public safety a central message to his platform, while seeking to incorporate ideas he ran on for president, such as a version of universal basic income.

John Liu et al. standing in front of a sign: Mayoral candidate Andrew Yang greets supporters at a Manhattan hotel as he concedes in his campaign for mayor on June 22, 2021 in New York City. © Spencer Platt, Getty Images Mayoral candidate Andrew Yang greets supporters at a Manhattan hotel as he concedes in his campaign for mayor on June 22, 2021 in New York City.

But he suffered a number of key gaffes that his rivals used as campaign fodder, such as admitting to leaving the city for the Hudson Valley in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic or having never voted in a New York City mayoral election before.

The Left Had Been Rising in NYC—Is Eric Adams About To Knock It Down?

  The Left Had Been Rising in NYC—Is Eric Adams About To Knock It Down? New York has not seen a Democratic primary for mayor this volatile and wide open in decades and, if the polls hold, the city’s next mayor could well be a former cop and Republican who’s poised to push back against the rising left and who’s dabbled in racial demagoguery in the race’s closing days. Eight years ago, Bill de Blasio emerged from a crowded field to lock down the race with weeks to go, dominating his opponents in the polls during the campaign’s final days. Once a long-shot, he had become a front-runner and did not disappoint his supporters on election night.

Yang fought back against the criticism, especially after he drew jabs for saying the Times Square subway station was his favorite. His campaign cast attacks he wasn't a "true" New Yorker as racist, and he sought to shed light on a spike in anti-Asian hate crimes in the city.

Progressives in the race: New York City's mayoral race is all about police, crime. Will Ocasio-Cortez endorsement give progressives a boost?

Wiley emerged as the progressive favorite in the race after two other progressive candidates' campaigns faced setbacks. She won the backing of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and other left-leaning politicians in the city.

Her platform included progressive policies like investing in public housing, financing a stipend for child and elder care and diverting police funding to schools and mental health and homelessness services.

Maya Wiley et al. standing on a stage posing for the camera: Democratic New York City mayoral candidate Maya Wiley watches with guests as primary election results are reported during an evening gathering on June 22, 2021 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. © Dia Dipasupil, Getty Images Democratic New York City mayoral candidate Maya Wiley watches with guests as primary election results are reported during an evening gathering on June 22, 2021 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.

Meanwhile, Kathryn Garcia leaned into her past government experience in her campaign. She also advocates for increasing policing in some areas of the city to fight crime while making climate change a key part of her campaign.

Before winning The New York Times and New York Daily News endorsements, she garnered little attention, but surged in polling as the race reached its end. In the final weekend of the campaign, she and Yang rallied together to promote ranked voting. However, while Yang backed her as his No. 2, Garcia didn't reciprocate.

Can Eric Adams Hold On to His Lead?

  Can Eric Adams Hold On to His Lead? What the first results of the mayoral race mean for him and his opponents.That’s the question of the mayoral race after the polls closed on Tuesday, showing him as the first choice of about 30 percent of voters in ranked-choice voting. Battling for second place, and a shot at Adams, are Maya Wiley and Kathryn Garcia. The previous front-runner, Andrew Yang, fell to fourth place and already conceded. Scott Stringer is a distant fifth.

What about the other races in New York City?

Facing the Democratic winner in November will be Curtis Sliwa, the founder of the Guardian Angels who won the Republican primary for mayor Tuesday.

Democratic voters far outnumber Republicans in the city, and Sliwa is not expected to stand much of a chance against any Democratic candidate. He was also endorsed by former Republican Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

In two other citywide elections, progressive candidates fared better. Incumbent Public Advocate Jumaane Williams appeared to cruise to reelection, while Brad Lander was leading the pack in the race for comptroller. That race also uses ranked voting, and City Council Speaker Corey Johnson trailed behind Lander in second.

In the much-watched Manhattan District Attorney race, former federal prosecutor Alvin Bragg was leading Tali Farhadian Weinstein, also a former federal prosecutor.

The winner of that race, which is not using ranked voting, will take over for Cyrus Vance, the longtime New York City prosecutor whose office is currently overseeing an investigation into former President Donald Trump and his family's businesses.

Follow USA TODAY's Ryan Miller on Twitter @RyanW_Miller

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Eric Adams is leading, but the race for New York City mayor isn't decided. Here's what we know.

Eric Adams Has Been Retooling the Racist Republican Playbook to His Advantage .
Eric Adams, who’s waiting for the votes to be counted as he appears to be on the verge of becoming New York City’s next mayor, has had a lot to say about anti-Black racism in politics lately—at least where his own campaign is concerned. In the weeks leading to election day, Adams equated questions about whether he resides in a Bed-Stuy basement unit or commutes from New Jersey to birther claims that “Obama was not born in America”; called a New York magazine profile detailing his connections to an assortment of corrupt sleazeballs and power brokers “a despicable racist portrayal,” and on Juneteenth portrayed the alliance between primary rivals Andrew Yang and Kathryn Garcia as

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