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Politics Toyota changes stand, halts donations to election objectors

00:30  09 july  2021
00:30  09 july  2021 Source:   msn.com

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Policy change comes after company donated to 38 objectors . The report sparked a backlash on social media with posts threatening boycotts and criticizing the company for supporting Trump’s false claims of election fraud. So the company on Thursday reinstated the ban on donations to those Republicans. “We understand that the PAC decision to support select members of Congress who contested the results troubled some stakeholders,” the company said in a statement.

Toyota Motor Corp (7203.T) said on Thursday its political action committee will halt donations to U.S. lawmakers that voted against U.S. President Joe Biden's election certification in January. The largest Japanese automaker has come under harsh criticism for donations to some lawmakers who voted against the certification of Biden's win in some states. "We are actively listening to our stakeholders and, at this time, have decided to stop contributing to those members of Congress who contested the certification of certain states in the 2020 election ," the company said.

DETROIT (AP) — Toyota has reversed itself and now says its political action committee will no longer contribute to the Republican legislators who voted against certifying Joe Biden's presidential election victory.

FILE - In this Sunday, March 21, 2021 file photo, The company logo adorns a sign outside a Toyota dealership in Lakewood, Colo. Toyota has reversed itself and says its political action committee will no longer contribute to legislators who voted against certifying Joe Biden’s presidential election win. The move comes after a social media backlash over the contributions, with threats to stop buying Toyota vehicles. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File) © Provided by Associated Press FILE - In this Sunday, March 21, 2021 file photo, The company logo adorns a sign outside a Toyota dealership in Lakewood, Colo. Toyota has reversed itself and says its political action committee will no longer contribute to legislators who voted against certifying Joe Biden’s presidential election win. The move comes after a social media backlash over the contributions, with threats to stop buying Toyota vehicles. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)

The move by the Japanese automaker comes after a social media backlash over the contributions, including threats to stop buying the company's vehicles.

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Toyota ’s Political Donations . The Japanese carmaker Toyota has given ,000 this year to 37 Republicans who objected to certifying the 2020 Election , far more than any other company. “Based on our thorough review, we decided against giving to some members who, through their statements and actions, undermine the legitimacy of our elections and institutions,” Toyota told Axios in a statement. Despite that, it also added, “We do not believe it is appropriate to judge members of Congress solely based on their votes on the electoral certification.”

Since then, Toyota has made political contributions to 37 of the 147 senators and representatives whose vote placed them in lock step with the conspiracy theory promoted by former President Trump that the election was stolen from him. The conspiracy claim fueled the insurrection at the U.S The business community seemed to recognize its gravity, at least at first — nearly 200 corporate donors said in the aftermath that they would suspend or end donations to the 147 lawmakers. Toyota wasn't among those taking that stand . Since then, several companies have walked back their pledges.

“We understand that the PAC decision to support select members of Congress who contested the results troubled some stakeholders,” Toyota said in a statement Thursday. "We are actively listening to our stakeholders, and at this time, have decided to stop contributing to those members of Congress who contested the certification of certain states in the 2020 election.”

Last week the website Axios reported that Toyota led companies in donations to the 147 members of Congress who voted in January against certifying election results on the false grounds that the election was stolen from then-President Donald Trump.

The Axios report, based on data gathered by Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, said that Toyota donated $55,000 to 37 Republican objectors this year. That number was more than double the amount donated by the second-highest donor, Cubic Corp., a defense contractor in San Francisco, Axios said.

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Toyota is facing boycott calls following reports that the company defended its donations to Republicans who objected to certifying the 2020 election . Axios reported that Toyota gave ,000 to 37 Republican objectors this year, based on data from Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW). Its not about bailouts. Unless somethin has changed in ta last few months: Ford Motor will resume making political donations and will not rule out donations to those lawmakers who voted on Jan. 6 against certifying President Joe Biden's election win, according to a letter from

Toyota customers are going places, all right — a recent report on the Japanese auto maker’s political donations is driving critics to competitors like Honda and Subaru, if the Twitter backlash is to be believed. The calls for boycotting Toyota TM, +0.31% and its brands like Lexus stem from an Axios And while ,000 might not look like an exorbitant amount on paper, Axios noted that this is more than twice as much as the No. 2 company on the list in terms of donations to Republican election objectors , which was San Diego-based defense contractor Cubic Corp. What’s more, Toyota ’s GOP

Toyota will not seek refunds of contributions it already has made, spokesman Scott Vazin said Thursday in an email. He said the company hasn't decided if or when it will resume the contributions.

Immediately after Toyota's spending was reported, the company defended it, saying it did not believe it’s appropriate to judge legislators based only on their electoral certification vote.

The company took input from employees and government officials, Vazin said. But the most important factor was customer feedback, he said. “That really drives our decision making,” he said.

Contribution data showed that 34 companies donated at least $5,000 to the campaigns and leadership political action committees of one or more election objectors this year, Axios reported.

In addition to criticism on Twitter and elsewhere, the Lincoln Project, a group opposed to Trump, released an internet ad urging people to call Toyota to get the company to stop contributing to the GOP members of Congress.

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Toyota gave more than twice as much — and to nearly five times as many members of Congress — as the No. 2 company on the list, Cubic Corp., a San Diego-based defense contractor. The Japanese automaker's donations this year included a February contribution to Rep. "Based on our thorough review, we decided against giving to some members who, through their statements and actions, undermine the legitimacy of our elections and institutions.” The spokesperson did not respond to a follow-up about the specific threshold for statements that cross that line.

Over the weekend, Toyota became the latest company to be targeted for donating to Republican " election objectors ." But the automaker isn't taking the heat lying down.What happened?In an article published Sunday by Axios, reporter Lachlan Markay chastised the Japanese automaker for donating money to " Toyota gave more than twice as much — and to nearly five times as many members of Congress — as the No. 2 company on the list," Markay noted. He was also keen to point out that the donations aided lawmakers who remain "deeply enmeshed in the pro-Trump conspiracy theories that

Shortly after the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, dozens of big companies, citing their commitment to democracy, pledged to avoid donating money to the 147 lawmakers. It was a striking gesture by some of the most familiar names in business but was largely an empty one.

Six months later, many of those companies have resumed funneling cash to political action committees that benefit the election efforts of lawmakers whether they objected to the election certification or not.

Walmart, Pfizer, Intel, General Electric and AT&T are among companies that announced their pledges on behalf of democracy in the days after Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in a violent bid to disrupt the transfer of power. The companies contend that donating directly to a candidate is not the same as giving to a PAC that supports them.

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