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Politics Overnight Energy: Bipartisan framework remains mostly consistent on climate | Pelosi, Schumer vow climate action: 'It is an imperative'

01:13  29 july  2021
01:13  29 july  2021 Source:   thehill.com

Infrastructure push on rocky ground as key Senate test vote looms

  Infrastructure push on rocky ground as key Senate test vote looms It could all come together, or it could all fall apart. © Alex Wong/Getty Images Senate Majority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) listens during a news briefing after a Senate Democratic Policy Luncheon at the U.S. Capitol July 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. Those are the stakes for President Joe Biden's infrastructure agenda as it faces a critical week in the Senate that could prove to be a make-or-break moment for both a bipartisan deal and a broader package to expand the social safety net that Democrats intend to move on a party-line vote.

IT IS WEDNESDAY, MY DUDES. Welcome to Overnight Energy, your source for the day's energy and environment news.

a group of people holding a sign: Overnight Energy: Bipartisan framework remains mostly consistent on climate | Pelosi, Schumer vow climate action: 'It is an imperative' © Getty Images Overnight Energy: Bipartisan framework remains mostly consistent on climate | Pelosi, Schumer vow climate action: 'It is an imperative'

Please send tips and comments to Rachel Frazin at rfrazin@thehill.com . Follow her on Twitter: @RachelFrazin . Reach Zack Budryk at zbudryk@thehill.com or follow him at @BudrykZack .

Today we're looking at the latest bipartisan infrastructure deal, vows to stick to ambitious climate targets from Democratic leaders, and a reported Biden administration plan to compensate industries affected by offshore wind.

Pelosi's Dems grit their teeth amid Senate infrastructure drama

  Pelosi's Dems grit their teeth amid Senate infrastructure drama “We’re not a cheap date,” quipped House Rules Committee Chair Jim McGovern. "The House is going to do what we have to do.” Those cross-Capitol tensions boiled over on Monday with House Transportation Committee Chair Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) ripping into the Senate talks during a private call. DeFazio, who is enraged that the bipartisan negotiators seem to be largely ignoring the infrastructure bill he shepherded through the House earlier this year, even said he hoped the Senate talks fell apart. He wasn’t alone. Rep. Salud Carbajal (D-Calif.

LET'S MAKE A DEAL: Bipartisan framework remains mostly consistent on climate

The latest iteration of the bipartisan infrastructure deal is remaining largely in line with a previously announced version of the framework on energy and environment spending.

The latest figures come after lawmakers said they reached an agreement on "major issues."

Like a previously announced version, the latest deal would put $73 billion towards power infrastructure, $7.5 billion towards electric buses and transit, $55 billion for water infrastructure and $21 billion for environmental cleanups.

What else?: Also in line with the prior proposal, it would put $7.5 billion towards building out a network of electric vehicle chargers, though it's unclear whether an additional $7.5 billion in low-cost financing for the effort that had been announced by the White House will be included.

Daily on Energy: Biden yields to Nord Stream 2 pipeline completion

  Daily on Energy: Biden yields to Nord Stream 2 pipeline completion Subscribe today to the Washington Examiner magazine and get Washington Briefing: politics and policy stories that will keep you up to date with what's going on in Washington. SUBSCRIBE NOW: Just $1.00 an issue! © Provided by Washington Examiner DOE Default Image - July 2021 US AND GERMANY NOTCH NORD STREAM 2 DEAL: The U.S. and Germany are expected to announce a deal today paving the way for the completion of Russia’s Nord Stream 2 natural gas pipeline, as the Biden administration effectively yields to the inevitability of the project’s construction and looks to repair relations with its key European ally.

The new proposal cuts down on investments in public transit, which would have received $49 billion in a prior proposal but would get just $39 billion in the new package.

Read more from the fact sheet released by the White House here.

FOLLOW THE LEADERS: Pelosi, Schumer vow climate action: 'It is an imperative'

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) spoke Wednesday at a League of Conservation Voters press conference to vow action on climate change, calling such action "imperative."

"It is an imperative that we get this job done and we fully intend to do it," Pelosi said in her remarks.

"What we can do in the next few months in terms of big, bold action is like nothing this nation and this world has ever seen before," Schumer added. "We are surrounded by evidence of the climate crisis: the fires, the heatwaves out west, the floods."

"I tell my constituents in New York, COVID was horrible, but if we do nothing on climate, each year will be worse than COVID and each year will be worse than the previous year," the majority leader said.

Dems are 'not particularly pleased' with the Senate infrastructure deal. They'll back it anyway.

  Dems are 'not particularly pleased' with the Senate infrastructure deal. They'll back it anyway. The party seems content to enter the home stretch of the infrastructure drama united — and leave Republicans split.Those are Democratic senators' scintillating reviews for a plan billed as a major goal of President Joe Biden. As negotiators rush to finish their package by Monday, they're signaling they’ll go along with it, even if it’s through gritted teeth.

What action is Schumer vowing?: Schumer cited the climate provisions in the bipartisan infrastructure deal reached in the Senate and also pledged to include aggressive climate measures in the Senate's reconciliation bill.

He specifically vowed to ensure a "robust Civilian Climate Corps" is part of the final reconciliation package, saying that "as the crisis comes closer and closer ... we'll have an educated corps of people able to fight it not just this year and next year but on into the future."

"It's spreading, everyone knows the crisis," Schumer said. "It's only the people with their head in the sand or some of our Republican colleagues who are in the palm of the oil, gas and coal industry who don't realize it or don't want to realize it."

Read more about the press conference here.

WIND IN YOUR HAIR: Biden administration considering payments to fishing industry to offset offshore wind losses: report

The federal government is reportedly examining a plan to financially compensate the commercial fishing industry for business lost as a result of expanded Atlantic wind power, Reuters reported Wednesday.

Pelosi, Portman skirmish over bipartisan infrastructure timeline

  Pelosi, Portman skirmish over bipartisan infrastructure timeline At issue is whether the bipartisan plan will be considered alone or paired with a second package favored by Democrats.During separate appearances on ABC’s "This Week with George Stephanopoulos," Pelosi and Portman (R-Ohio), the lead GOP negotiator for the bipartisan infrastructure talks, offered dueling views as to when the bipartisan package should head to President Joe Biden’s desk for a signature.

The report comes as the industry has come out strongly against the proposed offshore wind projects, which they say could interfere with both the ecosystems and harvesting of scallops, clams, squid and lobster.

The U.S. has fallen far behind Europe in the development of offshore wind amid heavy lobbying against permitting for large-scale projects by the fishing industry.

States urge action: Nine coastal states also urged the federal government to develop plans for addressing the potential damage to fisheries in a letter earlier this month.

Signers of the letter, including New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Maine, Connecticut, Virginia, Maryland and New Hampshire, called on the administration to develop "mitigation frameworks for demonstrated negative impacts" on the affected fisheries, according to Reuters.

Read more about the report here.

WHAT WE'RE READING:

India Ditches Key Climate Meeting After Disrupting G-20, Bloomberg reports

'An abomination': the story of the massacre that killed 216 wolves, The Guardian reports

How climate change is making parts of the world too hot and humid to survive, The Washington Post reports

Eviction ban's end could leave millions baking in heat waves, E&E News reports

ON TAP TOMORROW:

  • The Senate Environment & Public Works Committee will hold hearings to examine the nominations of Stephen A. Owens, Jennifer Beth Sass and Sylvia E. Johnson, of North Carolina to be Members of the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.
  • The House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis will hold a hearing on Financing Climate Solutions and Job Creation
  • The House Foreign Affairs Committee will hold a hearing entitled "Renewable Energy Transition: A Case Study of How International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Technology Benefits American Workers"

ICYMI: Stories from Wednesday (and Tuesday night)...

Infrastructure bill would transform energy, but maybe not enough

  Infrastructure bill would transform energy, but maybe not enough The bipartisan infrastructure bill in the Senate would spend billions to shift toward a less carbon-centric power sector in the United States, as some advocates say they are looking for more to be done or question the direction of the legislation altogether. The bill, which includes both baseline and new spending, was devised during weeks […] The post Infrastructure bill would transform energy, but maybe not enough appeared first on Roll Call.

Bipartisan framework remains mostly consistent on climate

Biden administration considering payments to fishing industry to offset offshore wind losses: report

Energy chief touts electric vehicle funding in Senate plan

Australian fires had larger impact on climate than pandemic lockdowns: study

Pelosi, Schumer vow climate action: 'It is an imperative'

Two dead, dozens injured in Texas chemical plant leak

Shell to buy renewable energy company

OFFBEAT BUT ON-BEAT: Well... just watch.

House moderates may oppose budget without infrastructure vote .
Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s plan to link the Senate’s $550 billion bipartisan infrastructure plan to a $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation package is starting to backfire, as moderate Democrats warn they may not vote for a budget resolution needed to begin the reconciliation process unless it’s paired with a vote on the Senate bill. Rep. Ed Case […] The post House moderates may oppose budget without infrastructure vote appeared first on Roll Call.

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