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Politics Congress passes $2.1 billion bipartisan bill for Capitol security and Afghan visas

01:01  30 july  2021
01:01  30 july  2021 Source:   msn.com

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Congress on Thursday approved a $ 2 . 1 billion spending bill that would address security concerns at the U.S. Capitol , and bolster federal efforts to relocate Afghans that aided U.S. forces during the war in Afghanistan . The spending bill includes roughly $ 1 billion for Capitol security to cover costs incurred during the insurrection, and ensure that the Capitol is protected in the future. This includes approximately 0 million for Capitol Police, which was at risk of furloughing officers without the additional funds, and 0 million to reimburse the National Guard for deployment to Capitol Hill.

The bill includes almost $ 1 billion for Capitol security — 0 million for Capitol Police, 0 million for security measures and 0 million for the National Guard, which concluded its mission at the Capitol in May. The bill also includes roughly . 1 billion for the special immigrant visa program to assist with Afghan interpreters Specifically, the bill would include .1 million to backfill overtime for Capitol Police until the department can hire and train additional officers, and .4 million in trauma support, including 6 new mental health counselors, according to the bill summary. Teaganne Finn.

  • The bill passed the Senate with unanimous support in a 98-0 vote, and later passed the House in a 416-11 vote.
  • The measure will go to President Joe Biden, who backed the measure in a statement.
a man standing in front of a building: An eight-foot-tall steel security fence continues to encircle the U.S. Capitol on April 05, 2021 in Washington, DC. Capitol Police Officer William © Provided by CNBC An eight-foot-tall steel security fence continues to encircle the U.S. Capitol on April 05, 2021 in Washington, DC. Capitol Police Officer William

Congress on Thursday approved a $2.1 billion spending bill that would address security concerns at the U.S. Capitol, and bolster federal efforts to relocate Afghans that aided U.S. forces during the war in Afghanistan.

It passed the Senate with unanimous support in a 98-0 vote, and later passed the House in a 416-11 vote. The measure will now go to President Joe Biden, who backed the measure in a statement Tuesday.

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The Senate passed a $ 2 . 1 billion Capitol security funding bill Thursday by a 98-0 vote. Why it matters: The legislation provides funding for the Capitol Police, the National Guard and other agencies to cover the costs incurred during the Jan. The package also includes about 0 million for the Department of Defense to assist Afghan nationals who facilitated U.S. war efforts. The State Department will also receive about 0 million to process special immigrant visas for Afghans who are relocating to the U.S., per the fact sheet.

The Senate security supplemental funding bill will provide funding for the Capitol Police, the National Guard and other law enforcement partners to cover costs incurred during the insurrection. The legislation would help ensure the Capitol is protected in the future by paying for security upgrades at the Capitol complex. According to the fact sheet, the legislation will also provide humanitarian assistance for Afghan refugees, including 0 million to the Department of State "for refugee and migration assistance and to improve and strengthen the Afghan Special Immigrant Visa program."

Democratic Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont, the Senate Appropriations Committee chair, and Sen. Richard Shelby of Alabama, the ranking Republican member, announced the bipartisan spending agreement on Tuesday.

On Tuesday, four police officers testified to the Jan. 6 House select committee about horrific violence they faced during the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol, where supporters of then-President Donald Trump stormed the building to disrupt Biden's electoral confirmation.

"We have to make a strong statement of support for those officers who defended the building and all that it stands for on that terrible day," Leahy said Thursday on the Senate floor.

The spending bill includes roughly $1 billion for Capitol security to cover costs incurred during the insurrection, and ensure the Capitol is protected in the future.

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Senate unanimously passes $ 2 . 1 bn Capitol security funding bill . The bill must still pass the House before Joe Biden can sign the legislation, but the White House has already “In light of the Supreme Court’s ruling, the President calls on Congress to extend the eviction moratorium to In case you missed it last night: the bipartisan infrastructure bill cleared its first procedural vote in the Senate

Congress is scrambling to pass a coronavirus stimulus bill before the end of 2020. Here’s what you need to know about what’s included in the legislation. (The Washington Post). The bipartisan group unveiled one 8 billion package that includes new unemployment benefits, small business aid and other programs that received broad bipartisan support. The second bill includes the two provisions most divisive among lawmakers — liability protections for firms and roughly 0 billion in aid for state and local governments — with the expectation that both could be excluded from a final deal to secure

This includes approximately $100 million for Capitol Police, which was at risk of furloughing officers without the additional funds, and $500 million to reimburse the National Guard for deployment to Capitol Hill.

It also allocates $300 million for security measures at the Capitol, such as upgraded window, door and security camera upgrades.

In May, the House passed a separate $1.9 billion security spending bill in response to the Jan. 6 insurrection, which provided roughly $44 million for Capitol Police.

Unlike the House bill, however, Leahy said the newly passed spending bill does not include the creation of a rapid response force to support Capitol Police.

The insurrection at the Capitol resulted in one of the worst days of injuries for U.S. law enforcement since the 9/11 terrorist attack, according to The New York Times.

Almost 140 police officers — 73 from the Capitol Police and 65 from the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington — were injured, the Times reported. The injuries ranged from bruises, concussions, rib fractures to a mild heart attack.

Capitol security funding bill: Senators reach $2 billion deal

  Capitol security funding bill: Senators reach $2 billion deal The top Democrat and Republican on the Senate Appropriations Committee have reached a deal on a roughly $2 billion Capitol Hill security spending bill in response to the deadly January 6 insurrection. © Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images The Capitol dome is seen early Wednesday morning before Amb. William Taylor And Deputy Assistant Secretary Of State George Kent testify at the first public impeachment hearing before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill November 13, 2019 in Washington, DC. Democratic Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont, the committee chair, and Sen.

Capitol Police pay would have been spent by next month if Congress did not act fast to clear the emergency cash, according to Leahy, and the National Guard would have had to stop training. Senators from both parties announce a bipartisan agreement on a $ 2 . 1 billion emergency security Officials have been discussing resources to repair security holes highlighted by insurgent rioting for months. Any arrangement that passes the Senate could come to a halt in the House. Three House Democrats who voted against the plan this spring said it didn’t go far enough in providing counseling and

The current bipartisan bill includes billion for passenger and freight rail, billion for broadband internet expansion, billion for transit. Tying the two bills together has resulted in some infighting among Democrats with progressives and moderates disagreeing on which bills should have priority. Senators should see a full version of the bipartisan bill later this week, however the Senate is currently scheduled to be on its August recess beginning August 10, although there is some discussion about changing that date.

"The last six months have pushed those who protect the U.S. Capitol to the limits. In the face of unprecedented adversity, they responded heroically," Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said on the Senate floor before the vote. "We must support them now, as they so courageously supported us."

Protecting Afghan allies

The other key part of the spending bill provides more than $1 billion for the special immigrant visa, or SIV, program for Afghans who assisted U.S. and coalition forces and may face retribution from the Taliban.

"We have the moral responsibility to stand with our Afghan partners who stood with us through two decades of war," Leahy said in the agreement released Tuesday.

This comes as the Taliban continues to make advances on rural provinces in the war-torn country, with record high numbers of Afghan civilian casualties during the first six months of this year, according to a United Nations report.

a group of people standing around a bench: Handover ceremony at Camp Anthonic, from U.S. Army to Afghan Defense Forces in Helmand province, Afghanistan May 2, 2021. © Provided by CNBC Handover ceremony at Camp Anthonic, from U.S. Army to Afghan Defense Forces in Helmand province, Afghanistan May 2, 2021.

As part of the bill, the Defense Department will get $500 million to provide emergency transportation, housing and other essential services to Afghan partners.

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The Department of Health and Human Services will also receive $25 million from the bill to provide assistance to Afghans who arrive in the U.S. after being granted special immigration status. This includes financial, medical, and housing support.

The bill also allocates $600 million for the State Department to provide humanitarian assistance to Afghans in neighboring countries, and improve the SIV program by increasing the number of visas by 8,000 and expediting the application process.

The passage of the new spending bill comes as the U.S. works with allies to secure several overseas locations for approximately 4,000 Afghan nationals and their families under Operation Allies Refuge. Applicants who are nearing the completion of their visa process will be evacuated to the U.S. Army garrison in Fort Lee, Virginia for several days, according to a State Department official.

Last week, the Biden administration announced the beginning of evacuation flights for Afghans and their families who assisted the U.S. and coalition forces.

White House principal deputy press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre told reporters on Thursday that the administration would not provide specific details about the flights, citing security concerns.

In April, Biden announced a full withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan by Sept. 11. The president gave an updated timeline earlier this month, saying that the massive job would be done by Aug. 31.

The nation's highest military officer told reporters last week that the U.S. has completed more than 95% of the withdrawal.

Until it is finished, the U.S. continues to support Afghan forces by conducting airstrikes against the Taliban.

House moderates may oppose budget without infrastructure vote .
Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s plan to link the Senate’s $550 billion bipartisan infrastructure plan to a $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation package is starting to backfire, as moderate Democrats warn they may not vote for a budget resolution needed to begin the reconciliation process unless it’s paired with a vote on the Senate bill. Rep. Ed Case […] The post House moderates may oppose budget without infrastructure vote appeared first on Roll Call.

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