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Politics Evictions loom after Biden and Congress fail to extend ban

07:43  01 august  2021
07:43  01 august  2021 Source:   nydailynews.com

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A nationwide eviction moratorium is set to expire Saturday night after Biden and Democrats ultimately failed to align on a long-shot strategy to prevent millions of Americans from being forced from their homes during a COVID-19 surge. Hours before the ban was set to expire, Biden called on local governments to “take all possible steps” to immediately disburse the funds. Evictions could begin as soon as Monday. “There can be no excuse for any state or locality not accelerating funds to landlords and tenants that have been hurt during this pandemic,” Biden said in a statement.

A national eviction moratorium is set to expire Saturday night after President Joe Biden and Congress failed to extend it. The stunning outcome, as the White House and Congress each expected the other to act, exposed a rare divide between the president and his allies on Capitol Hill — one that could have lasting impact as the nation’s renters face widespread evictions . Biden set off the scramble by announcing he would allow the eviction ban to expire instead of challenging a recent Supreme Court ruling signaling this would be the last deadline.

WASHINGTON (AP) — A nationwide eviction moratorium is set to expire Saturday night after President Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress worked furiously but ultimately failed to align on a long-shot strategy to prevent millions of Americans from being forced from their homes during a COVID-19 surge.

More than 3.6 million Americans are at risk of eviction, some in a matter of days, as nearly $47 billion in federal housing aid to the states during the pandemic has been slow to make it into the hands of renters and landlords owed payments. The moratorium expires at midnight.

text: People from a coalition of housing justice groups hold signs protesting evictions during a news conference outside the Statehouse in Boston, Mass. © Michael Dwyer People from a coalition of housing justice groups hold signs protesting evictions during a news conference outside the Statehouse in Boston, Mass.

People from a coalition of housing justice groups hold signs protesting evictions during a news conference outside the Statehouse in Boston, Mass. (Michael Dwyer/)

Tensions mounted late Friday as it became clear there was no resolution in sight. Hours before the ban was set to expire, Biden called on local governments to “take all possible steps” to immediately disburse the funds. Evictions could begin as soon as Monday.

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WASHINGTON (AP) — A nationwide eviction moratorium is set to expire Saturday after President Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress worked furiously but ultimately failed to align on a long-shot strategy to prevent millions of Americans from being forced from their homes during a COVID-19 Hours before the ban was set to expire, Biden called on local governments to “take all possible steps” to immediately disburse the funds. Evictions could begin as soon as Monday. “There can be no excuse for any state or locality not accelerating funds to landlords and tenants that have been hurt during this

A national eviction moratorium is set to expire Saturday night after President Joe Biden and Congress failed to extend it. The stunning outcome, as the White House and Congress each expected the other to act, exposed a rare divide between the president and his allies on Capitol Hill — one that could have lasting impact as the nation’s renters face widespread evictions . Biden set off the scramble by announcing he would allow the eviction ban to expire instead of challenging a recent Supreme Court ruling signaling this would be the last deadline.

“There can be no excuse for any state or locality not accelerating funds to landlords and tenants that have been hurt during this pandemic,” Biden said in a statement.

“Every state and local government must get these funds out to ensure we prevent every eviction we can,” he said.

The stunning outcome, as the White House and Congress each expected the other to act, exposed a rare divide between the president and his allies on Capitol Hill — one that could have lasting impact as the nation’s renters face widespread evictions.

Joe Biden wearing a suit and tie: President Joe Biden © Provided by New York Daily News President Joe Biden

President Joe Biden (Susan Walsh/)

Biden set off the scramble by announcing he would allow the eviction ban to expire instead of challenging a recent Supreme Court ruling signaling this would be the last deadline. He called on Congress on Thursday to swiftly pass legislation to extend the date.

Biden urges local governments to stave off evictions

  Biden urges local governments to stave off evictions President Biden, in a late plea to prevent rental evictions as the federal government's moratorium is set to expire this weekend, urged local governments on Friday to use federal funding to block evictions."Every state and local government must get these funds out to ensure we prevent every eviction we can," Biden said in a statement released Friday evening."State and local governments can and should use both the Emergency Rental Assistance and their American Rescue Plan state and local funds to support policies with courts, community groups, and legal aid to ensure no one seeks an eviction when they have not sought out Emergency Rental Assistance fun

A nationwide eviction moratorium expired Saturday after President Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress worked furiously but ultimately failed to align on a long-shot strategy to prevent millions of Americans from being forced from their homes during a COVID-19 surge. More than 3.6 million Hours before the ban was set to expire, Biden called on local governments to “take all possible steps” to immediately disburse the funds. Evictions could begin as soon as Monday. “There can be no excuse for any state or locality not accelerating funds to landlords and tenants that have been hurt during this

WASHINGTON (AP) — A nationwide eviction moratorium is set to expire Saturday night after President Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress worked furiously but ultimately failed to align on a long-shot strategy to prevent millions of Americans from being forced from their homes during a COVID-19 surge. More than 3.6 million Americans are at risk of eviction , some in a matter of days, as nearly billion in federal housing aid to the states during the pandemic has been slow to make it into the hands of renters and landlords owed payments. The moratorium expires at midnight.

Racing to respond Friday, Democrats strained to rally the votes. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi implored colleagues to pass legislation extending the deadline, calling it a “moral imperative,” to protect renters and also the landlords who are owed compensation.

Congress must “meet the needs of the American people: both the families unable to make rent and those to whom the rent is to be paid,” she said in an overnight letter late Thursday.

But after hours of behind-the-scenes wrangling throughout the day, Democratic lawmakers had questions and could not muster support to extend the ban even a few months. House Republicans objected to an attempt to simply approve an extension by consent, without a formal vote. The Senate may try again Saturday.

a couple of people that are talking to each other: House Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone, D-N.J., left, and House Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine Waters, D-Calif., go over their notes at the House Rules Committee as they prepare an emergency extension of the eviction moratorium, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, July 30. © Provided by New York Daily News House Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone, D-N.J., left, and House Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine Waters, D-Calif., go over their notes at the House Rules Committee as they prepare an emergency extension of the eviction moratorium, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, July 30.

House Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone, D-N.J., left, and House Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine Waters, D-Calif., go over their notes at the House Rules Committee as they prepare an emergency extension of the eviction moratorium, at the Capitol in Washington, Friday, July 30. (J. Scott Applewhite/)

Democratic lawmakers were livid at the prospect of evictions in the middle of a surging pandemic.

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“ Eviction crisis looms …” If you can’t find a job in this climate, you don’t want a job. Rise up demand better than throwing 6 million ppl out on streets during a pandemic. We live in a failed state.

Evictions loom after Biden , Congress fail to extend banhttp://bos.gl/ZhGZfjR.

“Housing is a primary social indicator of health, in and of itself, even absent COVID,” said Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.). “A mass eviction in the United States does represent a public health crisis unto itself.”


Video: Biden Administration Says National Eviction Moratorium Will Expire Saturday (CBS New York)

Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.), the Financial Services Committee chair who wrote the emergency bill, said House leaders should have held the vote, even if it failed, to show Americans they were trying to solve the problem.

“Is it emergency enough that you’re going to stop families from being put on the street?” Waters testified at a hearing Friday morning urging her colleagues to act. “What the hell is going to happen to these children?”

But Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers of Washington, the top Republican on another panel handling the issue, said the Democrats’ bill was rushed.

“This is not the way to legislate,” she said.

a person standing on top of a bed: Cristina Livingston recounts the problems she has had in her apartment including a leaking ceiling and mold in Bay Harbor Islands, Fla. Livingston, mother of two had lost her administrative assistant job during the pandemic. © Provided by New York Daily News Cristina Livingston recounts the problems she has had in her apartment including a leaking ceiling and mold in Bay Harbor Islands, Fla. Livingston, mother of two had lost her administrative assistant job during the pandemic.

Cristina Livingston recounts the problems she has had in her apartment including a leaking ceiling and mold in Bay Harbor Islands, Fla. Livingston, mother of two had lost her administrative assistant job during the pandemic. (Wilfredo Lee/)

The ban was initially put in place to prevent further spread of COVID-19 by people put out on the streets and into shelters.

Anger mounts as Biden, Congress allow eviction ban to expire

  Anger mounts as Biden, Congress allow eviction ban to expire WASHINGTON (AP) — Anger and frustration mounted in Congress over the weekend as a nationwide eviction moratorium expired during a surge in the COVID-19 pandemic. One Democratic lawmaker even camped outside the Capitol in protest as millions of Americans faced being forced from their homes. Lawmakers said they were blindsided by President Joe Biden’s inaction as the midnight Saturday deadline neared, some furious that he called on Congress to provide a last-minute solution to protect renters. The rare division between the president and his party carried potential lasting political ramifications.New York Rep.

Congress pushed nearly $47 billion to the states earlier in the COVID-19 crisis to shore up landlords and renters as workplaces shut down and many people were suddenly out of work.

But lawmakers said state governments have been slow to distribute the money. On Friday, they said only some $3 billion has been spent.

By the end of March, 6.4 million American households were behind on their rent, according to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. As of July 5, roughly 3.6 million people in the U.S. said they faced eviction in the next two months, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey.

Some places are likely to see spikes in evictions starting Monday, while other jurisdictions will see an increase in court filings that will lead to evictions over several months.

a group of people wearing costumes: Protesters display placards while calling for support for tenants and homeowners at risk of eviction during a demonstration on the Boston Common, in Boston, Mass. © Provided by New York Daily News Protesters display placards while calling for support for tenants and homeowners at risk of eviction during a demonstration on the Boston Common, in Boston, Mass.

Protesters display placards while calling for support for tenants and homeowners at risk of eviction during a demonstration on the Boston Common, in Boston, Mass. (Steven Senne/)

Biden said Thursday that the administration’s hands are tied after the Supreme Court signaled the moratorium would only be extended until the end of the month.

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At the White House, deputy press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said the administration backs the congressional effort “to extend the eviction moratorium to protect these vulnerable renters and their families.”

The White House has been clear that Biden would have liked to extend the federal eviction moratorium because of the spread of the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus. But there were also concerns that challenging the court could lead to a ruling restricting the administration’s ability to respond to future public health crises.

The administration is trying to keep renters in place through other means. It released more than $1.5 billion in rental assistance in June, which helped nearly 300,000 households. Biden on Thursday asked the departments of Housing and Urban Development, Agriculture and Veterans Affairs to extend their eviction moratoriums on households living in federally insured, single-family homes. In a statement late Friday, the agencies announced an extension of the foreclosure-related ban through the end of September.

On a 5-4 vote last month, the Supreme Court allowed the broad eviction ban to continue through the end of July. One of those in the majority, Justice Brett Kavanaugh, made clear he would block any additional extensions unless there was “clear and specific congressional authorization.”

a person holding a stop sign on a city street: People protesting evictions are pictured on Broadway near Chamber Street in Manhattan, New York. © Luiz C. Ribeiro People protesting evictions are pictured on Broadway near Chamber Street in Manhattan, New York.

People protesting evictions are pictured on Broadway near Chamber Street in Manhattan, New York. (Luiz C. Ribeiro/)

Aides to Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), the chair of the Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs, said the two were working on legislation to extend the moratorium and were asking Republicans not to block it.

“The public health necessity of extended protections for renters is obvious,” said Diane Yentel, executive director of the National Low Income Housing Coalition. “If federal court cases made a broad extension impossible, the Biden administration should implement all possible alternatives, including a more limited moratorium on federally backed properties.”

Landlords, who have opposed the moratorium and challenged it repeatedly in court, are against any extension. They, too, are arguing for speeding up the distribution of rental assistance.

The National Apartment Association and several others this week filed a federal lawsuit asking for $26 billion in damages because of the impact of the moratorium.

“Any extension of the eviction moratorium equates to an unfunded government mandate that forces housing providers to deliver a costly service without compensation and saddles renters with insurmountable debt,” association president and CEO Bob Pinnegar said, adding that the current crisis highlights a need for more affordable housing.

Biden's new evictions moratorium faces legality doubts .
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden may have averted a flood of evictions and solved a growing political problem when his administration reinstated a temporary ban on evictions because of the COVID-19 crisis. But he left his lawyers with legal arguments that even he acknowledges might not stand up in court. The new eviction moratorium announced Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention could run into opposition at the Supreme Court, where one justice in late June warned the administration not to act further without explicit congressional approval.

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