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Politics The long and winding road to an infrastructure bill: Reporter's notebook

13:21  07 august  2021
13:21  07 august  2021 Source:   abcnews.go.com

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But reporters had to hang nearby, unsure of whether senators might finally strike an agreement on how to proceed and pass the bill in the early morning hours. Majority Whip John Thune told me at about 9 p.m. that he was “not feeling it.” But after covering this bill for months, I couldn’t bare to take a chance and miss final passage. So I sat in the Senate with my colleagues from other TV and print outlets and we waited until we knew for sure whether the vote would occur. In the meantime, we ate cold leftover chicken tenders and sat in the chamber trying to list every senator from memory on a scratch sheet of

The long and winding road to an infrastructure bill : Reporter ’ s notebook . The uncrewed mission will provide valuable data toward NASA certifying Boeing’s crew transportation system for regular flights with astronauts to and from the ISS, the agency noted . The test launch was originally scheduled for last Friday but was delayed because of weather conditions in the area, the space agency acknowledged.

"Senator, what is a goat rodeo?"

When you start covering Congress, you don't imagine yourself asking a United States senator these types of questions just outside the hallowed chamber walls at 11 p.m. But that is how Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., described Thursday's late night Senate-wide paralysis when members tried, and ultimately failed, to agree on a path forward to expedite passage of a massive bipartisan infrastructure deal that is a key priority for President Joe Biden.

Bill Cassidy, Lisa Murkowski, Rob Portman, Joe Manchin, Jeanne Shaheen, Mark Warner standing in front of a crowd posing for the camera © Alex Wong/Getty Images, FILE

"It's like a dumpster fire with animals," Kennedy said, departing the floor upon learning his colleagues had not, despite hours of bickering, come to an agreement on a set of amendment votes that would have allowed the bipartisan infrastructure bill to pass that night.

What is Biden talking about?

  What is Biden talking about? Democrats have expanded the meaning of infrastructure to cover their entire policy wish list.Jesus preached about the wise man and the foolish man who built houses. Both houses were buffeted by storms or floods. The difference: The wise man “dug deep and laid the foundation on the rock” while the foolish man “built his house on the sand.” The house built on stone stood strong, and the one built on a foundation of sand collapsed.

It has been a long and winding road , but nine years after being approved and a somewhat bumpy ride the £1bn Aberdeen bypass journey is finally complete. A peripheral route around the Granite City was first considered back in the 1950 s but it took several decades for serious planning to get out of first gear. In 2010, the International School of Aberdeen moved to a new home from its original campus to make way for the road . It was hoped work on the bypass could get under way the next year. However, RoadSense soon instructed lawyers to begin action against the Scottish government' s decision to give

The Hill is the premier source for policy and political news. Follow for tweets on what' s happening in Washington, breaking news and retweets of our reporters . Hey @tedcruz when your state can keep the f’in lights on then maybe you can talk about infrastructure .

Ah yes... a dumpster fire with animals. That's how you love to hear the upper chamber described.

The evenly divided Senate is currently on track to take a key procedural vote on a $1.1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure deal that would fund things like roads, bridges and waterways, on Saturday. It's been a lengthy journey, the conclusion of which is still unclear.

MORE: Bipartisan negotiators unveil 2,702-page infrastructure bill

Depending on whose timeline you're referencing, the Senate has now been working on infrastructure for at least four months. If Congress succeeds at getting this done, it will be a huge victory for the president and for the lawmakers who helped craft the bill.

Kevin Cramer, Lisa Murkowski, Susan Collins, Rob Portman standing next to a person in a suit and tie: A news conference after a procedural vote for the bipartisan infrastructure framework at Dirksen Senate Office Building July 28, 2021 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. © Alex Wong/Getty Images, FILE A news conference after a procedural vote for the bipartisan infrastructure framework at Dirksen Senate Office Building July 28, 2021 on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

On the way there, there have been many stages of negotiations and lots of closed-door meetings, which means there have been countless evenings spent sitting in the hallways with fellow Senate reporters eating Skittles and trying to outwit one another on Twitter while waiting for senators to emerge with even a morsel on the state-of-play.

House moderates may oppose budget without infrastructure vote

  House moderates may oppose budget without infrastructure vote Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s plan to link the Senate’s $550 billion bipartisan infrastructure plan to a $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation package is starting to backfire, as moderate Democrats warn they may not vote for a budget resolution needed to begin the reconciliation process unless it’s paired with a vote on the Senate bill. Rep. Ed Case […] The post House moderates may oppose budget without infrastructure vote appeared first on Roll Call.

A rocky road awaits the bipartisan infrastructure bill in the House. Senator Chuck Schumer, Democrat of New York and the majority leader, speaks with reporters on Monday during an amendment vote for the infrastructure bill .Credit Sarahbeth Maney/The New York Times. As senators grind through votes this week on a trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill , discontent is building among progressive Democrats, signaling a potentially bitter intraparty fight to come in the House. Liberals who bristled at seeing their top priorities jettisoned as President Biden and other Democrats sought an elusive deal

The new land acquisition Bill will increase costs manifold and further delay real estate and infrastructure projects, say experts. Infrastructure -focused PE firms tweak strategies for road sector. Reporter ' s Notebook | IDFC looks to diversify beyond infrastructure .

First, we staked out a key group of Republicans who crafted a package, which the administration ultimately dismissed upon announcing that the GOP was not willing to consider a top-line value they found palatable.

And then there was (and I'm cringing as I type out this acronym) the BIF.

BIF = bipartisan infrastructure framework. Crafted in the basement hideaways of the Senate late into the night, over, at varying times, pizza, cannolis, wine, tacos, burritos (and many other food items I failed to track), the BIF formed the foundations of the bill the Senate is preparing to vote on.

A group of 10 bipartisan senators, led by Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz, spent weeks crafting the BIF before, at long last, emerging from the White House in June and announcing that the BIF had transformed into the BID. That's right: the bipartisan infrastructure DEAL.

Now you would think an announced deal would be a huge relief for Senate reporters. No more closed-door meetings to sit on the floor in the hallway outside of right? Wrong.

The bipartisan infrastructure bill gives taxpayers a good bang for their buck

  The bipartisan infrastructure bill gives taxpayers a good bang for their buck The bipartisan infrastructure bill makes a transformative investment in the foundation of our economy and the future of American infrastructure.One of the reasons infrastructure projects cost significantly more in the United States than similar ones in other countries is our byzantine permitting process. The bill directs permitting agencies to cut average approval times to less than two years for major projects and includes several provisions to help make that happen without sacrificing important social and environmental protections.

The massive bipartisan infrastructure package, called the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, represents a major bipartisan achievement that will allow both parties to claim victory. It features 0 billion in new federal spending over five years. The measure invests 0 billion in funding toward Schumer' s decision to wind down debate is a delicate one as he works to successfully shepherd a major Democratic legislative priority through the Senate. The Senate has been debating and voting on amendments to the legislation throughout the week. Amendment votes got underway on Monday after

The Facts Inside Our Reporter ’ s Notebook . The infrastructure bill also includes a pilot program for a vehicle miles traveled (VMT) system that would tax drivers for the miles they drive as a potential future source of revenue for the Highway Trust Fund. According to the Tax Policy Center, "a tax on vehicle miles driven would provide a more direct link to the cost of highway use but, unlike an increase in the tax on motor fuels, would be difficult to implement, requiring new tolls or electronic motoring of vehicles."

MORE: Senate votes to start debate on $1.1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure deal

Turning a deal in principal into legislative language that can be voted on the floor takes time. With any bill it always does, and in this case, it took several weeks, which meant several more weeks of Skittles, Twitter, sitting on trash cans in the hallway, rinsing and repeating.

Further complicating this whole scenario is the fact that all of our time in the Senate hallways could prove useless if House progressives decide the bill doesn't suit them. This is a distinct possibility, and one House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is trying to avoid by promising not to pass the bipartisan bill in the House until the Senate sends her a second, larger, budget resolution that includes Biden's "human infrastructure" priorities.

The Senate is expected to get cracking on that budget bill in the coming days, but first, they've got to kick this one over the finish line. And on Thursday, procedural hijinks led to delay.

Failure to find unanimous agreement on amendments meant 13 hours of paralysis on the floor. But reporters had to hang nearby, unsure of whether senators might finally strike an agreement on how to proceed and pass the bill in the early morning hours.

AOC, Progressives Slam Moderate Dems' Concerns About $3.5T Bill: 'Bipartisan Doesn't Mean It's Good'

  AOC, Progressives Slam Moderate Dems' Concerns About $3.5T Bill: 'Bipartisan Doesn't Mean It's Good' "War was bipartisan. Tax cuts for the rich were bipartisan. Wall St bailouts were bipartisan," Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez tweeted.Moderate Democrats wrote a letter addressed to Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, a California Democrat, urging her to swiftly bring the bipartisan roughly $1 trillion infrastructure deal, which is nearing passage in the Senate, for a vote in the House, CNN reported on Saturday evening. They also raised concerns about the cost of the larger $3.5 trillion proposal that Democrats hope to pass through the budget reconciliation process without the need for any Republican votes.

Majority Whip John Thune told me at about 9 p.m. that he was "not feeling it." But after covering this bill for months, I couldn't bare to take a chance and miss final passage.

So I sat in the Senate with my colleagues from other TV and print outlets and we waited until we knew for sure whether the vote would occur.

In the meantime, we ate cold leftover chicken tenders and sat in the chamber trying to list every senator from memory on a scratch sheet of paper; we tweeted out gifs that only six other people intimately familiar with this procedural nightmare would find funny; and we ordered Chipotle and ate it on the steps of the Capitol while asking senators walking in and out when they thought we might see a final vote.

Most of them didn't know.

a person standing in front of a building: Alaska Republican Lisa Murkowski calls the sunset over the Capitol © ABC News Alaska Republican Lisa Murkowski calls the sunset over the Capitol "snap worthy" and stops to take a photo while waiting for the Senate to proceed on the bipartisan infrastructure bill.

But the senators, like us, can appreciate that it's taking a rather long time. And the senators, like us, can decide they find the pink and orange painted skyline of the Washington monument behind the Capitol "snap worthy" and stop to take a picture.

And they, like us, can appreciate that passing historic legislation is always a more time-consuming process than we thought it would be. And they, like us, seem willing to wait the few extra days necessary to get it done.

Opinion: Never underestimate Nancy Pelosi .
Lincoln Mitchell writes that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi faces a herculean task in getting the infrastructure bill passed, but if anyone is capable of rounding up the necessary votes to do so, she is.On Tuesday, the US Senate passed a $1.2 trillion infrastructure package by a 69-30 vote. Now, the only obstacle that stands in the way of it becoming law is passage in the US House of Representatives.

usr: 0
This is interesting!