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Politics Nine moderate Dems threaten budget and infrastructure deals

05:15  26 september  2021
05:15  26 september  2021 Source:   dailymail.co.uk

Democrats’ infrastructure gamble actually seems like it could be working

  Democrats’ infrastructure gamble actually seems like it could be working A lot could still go awry, but the Senate made some important progress this week.Effectively, they planned to do two things in parallel: work to advance a bipartisan infrastructure bill containing provisions Republicans and Democrats agreed on (like money for roads and bridges), and use a special budget reconciliation process to pass the priorities with only Democratic support, such as the extension of the child tax credit and a payment program intended to incentivize the use of clean energy.

Nancy Pelosi reacts after the Senate approved a trillion infrastructure plan.

A group of nine moderate Democrats told Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Friday they won’t vote for the .5 trillion budget package until the House passes the bipartisan infrastructure bill approved by the Senate. The threat is enough to sink the budget deal , which contains a long list of social policy Given the Democrats’ small majority in the House, she can only afford to lose three votes on any piece of legislation. Both moderates and liberals have enough votes to sink either piece – and both have threatened to do so. A threat from House moderates put Speaker Nancy Pelosi between a rock and

Nancy Pelosi, Josh Gottheimer are posing for a picture: MailOnline logo © Provided by Daily Mail MailOnline logo

A group of nine moderate Democrats told Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Friday they won't vote for the $3.5 trillion budget package until the House passes the bipartisan infrastructure bill approved by the Senate.

The threat is enough to sink the budget deal, which contains a long list of social policy items demanded by progressives.

But, in the other corner of the party are the liberals, who've told Pelosi they won't vote for the infrastructure deal until the Senate passes the budget package.

Friday's announcement puts Pelosi in a rock and hard place between the two wings of her party.

Democrats plan to move forward with infrastructure deal amid fierce infighting between moderates, progressives

  Democrats plan to move forward with infrastructure deal amid fierce infighting between moderates, progressives House Democratic leaders said a vote on the bipartisan infrastructure deal will be held next week amid tensions within the party over the size, scope and timing of President Biden’s domestic agenda. Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said Tuesday that the plan will be put up for a vote next Monday or Tuesday despite lingering questions over whether it will have enough Democratic votes to pass. As Democrats look to push through both the infrastructure deal and a much larger budget resolution, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi have been pushing a two-track plan for months, a strategy that has earned the support of the White House.

Nine Moderate Dems . The 9 moderate Democrats who wrote to Speaker Pelosi to say they will not vote for budget deal until House passes infrastructure first: Rep. Josh Gottheimer of New Jersey. ‘We is not going to contemplate voting for a budget decision till the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act passes the House and is signed into regulation,’ the moderates wrote of their letter, which was obtained by The New York Times. The Senate handed the .2 trillion infrastructure invoice – which funds conventional initiatives like roads and bridges – on Tuesday with 69 votes

A group of nine moderate Democrats told Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Friday they won’t vote for the .5 trillion budget package until the House passes the bipartisan infrastructure bill approved by the Senate. The threat is enough to sink the budget deal , which contains a long list of social policy Given the Democrats’ small majority in the House, she can only afford to lose three votes on any piece of legislation. Both moderates and liberals have enough votes to sink either piece – and both have threatened to do so. A threat from House moderates put Speaker Nancy Pelosi between a rock and

It also threatens to derail both pieces of legislation, which are central to President Joe Biden's legislative agenda and top talking points for Democrats headed into the 2022 midterm election.

The competing demands between the moderates and liberals essentially has Pelosi in a stalemate and threatens an early deal she made with progressives, who vastly outnumber the moderates.

Given the Democrats' small majority in the House, she can only afford to lose three votes on any piece of legislation. Both moderates and liberals have enough votes to sink either piece - and both have threatened to do so.

'With the livelihoods of hardworking American families at stake, we simply can't afford months of unnecessary delays and risk squandering this one-in-a-century, bipartisan infrastructure package,' the nine lawmakers, led by Rep. Josh Gottheimer of New Jersey, wrote to Pelosi. 'It's time to get shovels in the ground and people to work.'

9 House Dems Tell Pelosi They Won't Vote on Budget Resolution Till Infrastructure Bill Passes

  9 House Dems Tell Pelosi They Won't Vote on Budget Resolution Till Infrastructure Bill Passes House Democrats can lose only three votes and still prevail in finalizing the resolution without Republican support. "We will not consider voting for a budget resolution until the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act passes the House and is signed into law," the nine centrist Democrats wrote in a letter to Pelosi, obtained Friday by AP.For more reporting from the Associated Press, see below.The centrists' threat directly defies Pelosi's announced plans, and she is showing no signs of backing down.

Nine Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives sent a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) on Thursday, saying that the House should vote on the bipartisan infrastructure bill before voting on the budget resolution that should clear the path for the Democrats’ larger partisan package. If all nine of the Democrats who signed the letter decide to vote against a budget resolution, it could jeopardize its passage and put legislators into more intense debates. With Republicans pushing back against Democratic efforts to pass intensely partisan legislation, the Democrats can hardly afford to

A group of nine moderates is threatening to withhold their votes from Democrats’ .5 trillion budget resolution later this month, endangering Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s two-track plan to push both a massive infrastructure bill and social spending agenda through the House in the coming weeks. Several of those moderates, led by Rep. Josh Gottheimer (D-N.J.), had been issuing similar veiled warnings for weeks, calling on Pelosi to bring the bipartisan Senate infrastructure bill up for a vote as soon as it’s ready. But this is the first time the lawmakers have explicitly said they’re willing to block the budget

Nine Moderate Dems

The nine moderate Democrats who wrote to Speaker Pelosi to say they won't vote for budget deal unless House passes infrastructure first:

Rep. Josh Gottheimer of New Jersey

Rep. Vicente Gonzalez of Texas

Rep. Filemon Vela of Texas

Rep. Jared Golden of Maine

Rep. Ed Case of Hawaii

Rep. Kurt Schrader of Oregon

Rep. Henry Cuellar of Texas

Rep. Jim Costa of California

Rep. Carolyn Bourdeaux of Georgia

'We will not consider voting for a budget resolution until the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act passes the House and is signed into law,' the moderates wrote in their letter, which was obtained by The New York Times.

The Senate passed the $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill - which funds traditional projects like roads and bridges - on Tuesday with 69 votes, including 19 Republicans.


Video: Democrats release massive $3.5 trillion budget bill (CNBC)

With Biden's agenda hanging in the balance, progressive frustration with Sinema boils over

  With Biden's agenda hanging in the balance, progressive frustration with Sinema boils over There’s one big question on Democrats’ minds in Washington: What does Kyrsten Sinema want? The centrist Democratic senator from Arizona has made her opposition to her party’s $3.5 trillion budget proposal clear in recent months. Sinema has been meeting with President Biden throughout the week, including three times on Tuesday alone, as Democrats scramble to save their domestic agenda amid infighting between the party’s moderate and progressive factions. Yet according to Politico, Sinema has been reluctant to outline what she wants from the budget, telling Biden that she wants a bipartisan infrastructure deal to pass the House before she goes into specifics.

9 moderate House Dems say they won't support budget bill until infrastructure deal passes. Alan Fram. “We will not consider voting for a budget resolution until the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act passes the House and is signed into law,” nine centrists wrote in a letter to Pelosi obtained Friday by The Associated Press. Congressional passage of the budget resolution seems certain because without it, Senate Republicans would be able to use a filibuster, or procedural delays, to kill a follow-up .5 trillion measure bolstering social safety net and climate change programs.

Nine House Democrats signed a letter on Thursday threatening to block their party’s .5 trillion budget resolution until the House passes the .2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D., Calif.) has promised not to hold a vote on the bipartisan bill until the budget “Some have suggested that we hold off on considering the Senate infrastructure bill for months—until the reconciliation process is completed. We disagree,” the group wrote. “With the livelihoods of hardworking American families at stake, we simply can’t afford months of unnecessary delays and risk squandering

The Senate then approved on Wednesday the $3.5 trillion budget resolution with only Democratic votes.  If the House passes the resolution, it will allow Democrats in both chambers to pass a massive social policy program - including free pre-school, expanded paid family and medical leave, and environmental programs - this fall without fear of a Republican filibuster in the Senate.

Pelosi, to appease liberals in the House, said she would not bring the infrastructure bill up for a vote until the Senate passed the social policy bill.

But, with the Senate out for the summer, that may not happen into the fall, particularly as Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer needs to get his own moderate Democrats - particularly Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema - on board. Both Manchin and Sinema have raised concerns about the $3.5 trillion cost.

Friday's threat from moderates, however, endangers the two-track plan of passage that President Biden and congressional Democratic leaders saw as their way to ensure they get both pieces of legislation signed into law.

Will Democrats squander their biggest opportunity to reshape the country in decades?

  Will Democrats squander their biggest opportunity to reshape the country in decades? Less optimistic: Democrats can’t reach an agreement on the budget Monday but are so close that all the parties involved in negotiations agree to push the infrastructure vote back by a few days, and then pass it. Least optimistic: Democrats hold the vote on infrastructure, but it fails due to infighting, and they are left to pick up the pieces. Democrats who spoke to Yahoo News were cautiously confident — despite the high stakes and the sometimes chaotic feel on Capitol Hill — that they will ultimately unite to pass the infrastructure deal and the larger budget.

The letter is also signed by Democratic Reps. Vicente Gonzalez of Texas, Filemon Vela of Texas, Jared Golden of Maine, Ed Case of Hawaii, Kurt Schrader of Oregon, Henry Cuellar of Texas, Jim Costa of California and Carolyn Bourdeaux of Georgia.

The House is scheduled to return the week of August 23 to vote on the budget resolution.

Pelosi and Schumer have told their committee chairs in their respective chambers to draft the social policy package - also known as reconciliation legislation - by September 15.

The goal of leadership is to have both bills passed by late September or early October. But if the House can't pass the budget resolution, those plans could collapse.

Pelosi told Democrats on Wednesday she will not bring bipartisan infrastructure bill for a vote in the House until the Senate passed the other measure.

'I am not freelancing. This is the consensus,' she said on a call with House Democrats, according to The Hill newspaper.

'The president has said he's all for the bipartisan approach ... bravo! That's progress, but it ain't the whole vision,' Pelosi said on the call. 'The votes in the House and Senate depend on us having both bills.'

The speaker was under heavy pressure from the liberal wing of her party.

Rep. Pramila Jayapal, the head of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, informed Pelosi in a letter on Tuesday that she had taken a poll of their liberal members, who said they would not support the infrastructure bill without the budget reconciliation package.

'A majority of respondents affirmed that they would withhold their votes in support of the bipartisan legislation in the House of Representatives until the Senate adopted a robust reconciliation package,' Jayapal wrote.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her fellow members of 'The Squad' are part of that group.

The Democrat from New York has been clear she will not support one piece of legislation without the other.

'If there is not a reconciliation bill in the House and if the Senate does not pass a reconciliation bill, we will uphold our end of the bargain and not pass the bipartisan bill until we get all of these investments in,' Ocasio-Cortez said on CNN's 'State of the Union.' She added that the contents of the bipartisan bill 'are not all, you know, Candyland. There are some of these political pay-fors that are very alarming.'

Read more

Pelosi’s ‘toughest challenge’: Breaking down infrastructure, spending, debt limit, and shutdown fights .
This week is critical for President Joe Biden’s legislative agenda and Democratic congressional leaders managing slim majorities in both the House and the Senate. © Provided by Washington Examiner Not only do they want to overcome intraparty division over the timing and content of two large spending packages and pass them, but they aim to avoid a government shutdown and a looming debt ceiling crisis that could threaten the economy. Oregon Democratic Rep.

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