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Politics Jan. 6 committee subpoena targets begin turning over documents

13:41  14 october  2021
13:41  14 october  2021 Source:   usatoday.com

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WASHINGTON (AP) — At least three of the officials involved in organizing and running the Jan 6. rally that preceded the violent storming of the U.S. Capitol are handing over documents in response to subpoenas from the House committee investigating the attack.

The 11 organizers and staffers were given a Wednesday deadline to turn over documents and records as part of the committee’s investigation into the deadly insurrection that marked the most serious breach of the Capitol building since the War of 1812. The organizers have also been asked to appear at separate depositions the committee has scheduled beginning later this month.

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Other subpoenas have also been served to top White House officials and Trump advisers, including former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows and adviser Steve Bannon, who has thus far refused to cooperate, putting him at risk of being charged with contempt.

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Among those responding to the Wednesday deadline are Lyndon Brentnall, whose firm was hired to provide event security that day. “All the documents and communications requested by the subpoena were handed in,” he told The Associated Press.

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Two longtime Trump campaign and White House staffers, Megan Powers and Hannah Salem, who were listed on the Jan 6. rally permit as “operations manager for scheduling and guidance” and “operations manager for logistics and communications,” have also provided documents or are planning to do so.

Powers, who also served as the Trump reelection campaign’s director of operations, intends to provide the committee with the requested documentation and to meet with them — though it remains unclear what form such meetings will take, according to a person familiar with her response who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Brentnall had previously said his firm had “every intention” of complying with the select committee. “As far as we’re concerned, we ran security at a legally permitted event run in conjunction with the U.S. Secret Service and the Park Police,” he said.

The committee has said the subpoenas are part of its effort to collect information “on the planning, organization, and funding” of the Jan. 6 rally as well as other events planned to support Trump’s baseless claims of election fraud in the weeks between his November election defeat and the January attack.

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A committee spokesperson declined to comment Wednesday on the responses it had received and how many of the 11 were complying.

It remains unclear whether the others who were subpoenaed intend to cooperate.

They include Amy Kremer, the founder and chair of Women for America First, a pro-Trump group that was the lead organizer of the event; Cynthia Chafian, an organizer who submitted the first permit for the rally; and Caroline Wren, a veteran GOP fundraiser who was listed on permit paperwork for the Jan. 6 rally as a “VIP Advisor.”

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Also on the list are Maggie Mulvaney, a niece of former top Trump chief of staff Mick Mulvaney, who worked as director of finance operations for the Trump campaign and is now a congressional staffer; former Trump campaign official Katrina Pierson, who the committee says was “reportedly involved in the organization” of the rally on Jan. 6 and a smaller one the day before; and Justin Caporale and Tim Unes of Event Strategies Inc., who were listed on Jan. 6 permit paperwork as the rally’s project manager and stage manager, per the committee.

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None have responded to multiple requests for comment.

Two additional organizers, Ali Alexander and Nathan Martin, as well as their “Stop the Steal” organization, were also subpoenaed for documents, which are due Oct. 21.

Alexander wrote in a Telegram post Monday that the committee was “subpoenaing people in bad faith.”

“So maybe this Select Commitee is bogus?” he added. “Everyone is waiting to see what I’ll do.”

The committee has said two top Trump officials — Meadows and former Defense Department official Kashyap Patel — are “engaging” with the committee, though it is unclear exactly what that entails. It is also unclear whether Dan Scavino, Trump’s longtime social media director and one of his most loyal aides, will cooperate.

Members of the committee have said they are prepared to fight for the testimony and will use the courts to do so if necessary.

More: 'Rewrite history:' Trump and allies downplay Jan. 6 violence at the Capitol

Many of the rioters who stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6, trying to halt the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory, had marched up the National Mall after attending at least part of Trump’s rally, where he had repeated his baseless claims of election fraud and implored the crowd to “fight like hell.”

The results of the election were confirmed by state officials and upheld by the courts. Trump’s own attorney general, William Barr, said there was no evidence of widespread voter fraud that would have changed the outcome.

At least nine people died during and after the attack, including a Trump supporter who was shot and killed by police as she tried to break into the House chamber.

Colvin reported from New York and Smith from Providence, Rhode Island.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Jan. 6 committee subpoena targets begin turning over documents

Jan. 6 committee threatens contempt citation to Steve Bannon for defying subpoena .
A pair of top aides to then-President Donald Trump are "engaging” with subpoenas, the top lawmakers on the House select committee investigating the riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 said Friday. © Provided by Washington Examiner Rep. Bennie Thompson, the chairman of the committee, and Rep. Liz Cheney, its vice chairwoman, issued a joint statement confirming Mark Meadows, former White House chief of staff, and Kash Patel, a former Pentagon aide, have engaged the panel. The lawmakers also threatened to hold Trump adviser Steve Bannon in contempt of Congress if he does not comply with his subpoena.

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This is interesting!