•   
  •   
  •   

Politics Democrats' Dilemma: What to Trim From Massive Social Safety Net Expansion Plan

11:05  16 october  2021
11:05  16 october  2021 Source:   newsweek.com

Seniors vs. the poor? Democrats stare down stark tradeoffs in trying to fund health care expansion

  Seniors vs. the poor? Democrats stare down stark tradeoffs in trying to fund health care expansion Each of the expensive health care proposals in Democrats' spending package would help different people. So how do they choose?If they don’t extend recently expanded health insurance subsidies, premiums will rise for millions of Americans right before the 2022 midterm elections.

An expansive social policy bill being pushed by Democrats would fund universal pre-K through block grants and additional money to Head Start.Credit James Estrin/The New York Times. They say they are concerned that the plan is financially unsustainable and would undermine economic growth, by rendering Americans too dependent on the government for their basic needs. “What are Democrats trying to do to this country?” Representative Bruce Westerman, Republican of Arkansas, asked on Thursday, as the House Natural Resources Committee began drafting its portion of the sprawling bill.

Expanded health-care coverage for Medicare patients or universal pre-kindergarten? Is it better to have free community college or keep the child tax credit? Democrats in Washington are at a crossroads as they strive to trim down a contentious, enormous extension of the social safety net . Progressive Democrats have opposed attempts to reduce the .5 trillion cost, claiming that they intended to go even higher, while moderate Democrats feel it’s too expensive and have been negotiating a lower figure. The Congressional Progressive Caucus unveiled a fresh proposal this week that would keep all

Paid family leave or a dedicated corps to address the climate crisis? Universal pre-kindergarten or expanded health care benefits for Medicare patients? Free community college or continuing the child tax credit?

US President Joe Biden speaks about efforts to address global transportation supply chain bottlenecks, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC, on October 13, 2021. © Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images US President Joe Biden speaks about efforts to address global transportation supply chain bottlenecks, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC, on October 13, 2021.

Democrats in Washington are finding themselves at a crucial negotiating point as they try to figure out how to whittle down a partisan, massive expansion of the social safety net.

Budget gimmicks will define Democrats’ next trillion-dollar spending bill

  Budget gimmicks will define Democrats’ next trillion-dollar spending bill Government budgeting, both at the state and federal level, has always been partly about smoke and mirrors. For example, lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have long reduced the apparent cost of new spending or tax relief by making it “temporary” — and daring future lawmakers to stop the largesse. But Democrats striving to pare back their massive $3.5 trillion spending plan — the largest spending bill in history — appear poised to take such budget gimmicks to absurd new heights in the weeks ahead. As Politico reported Wednesday, © J.

Universal pre-kindergarten or expanded health care benefits for Medicare patients? Free community college or continuing the child tax credit? Democrats in Washington are finding themselves at a crucial negotiating point as they try to figure out how to whittle down a partisan, massive expansion of the social safety net . NewsOctober 15, 2021. Democrats ’ Dilemma : What to Trim F…

Democrats (in general) are advocates of growing the social safety net in the United States, the greatest example being that of expanding Medicaid or offering free healthcare to all. This is obviously a very expensive proposition. A proposal that can save the government money without having to shrink the safety net is to allow the government to negotiate drug prices under Medicare Part D, and also allow Medicare to offer their own plan under Part D. This would have the same effects as having Medicare for All.

Biden has dubbed the proposal—a crucial piece of his agenda that includes many of his campaign promises—as the Build Back Better agenda. It initially came with an estimated $3.5 trillion price tag, covering climate crisis initiatives, family programs and health care programs, among many other initiatives.

But as the legislation has faced a months-long standoff in Congress, Biden has acknowledged the amount will have to come down before it can pass.

"I'm convinced we're going to get it done—we're not going to get $3.5 trillion; we'll get less than that, but we're going to get it," Biden said during an event promoting the proposal in Connecticut on Friday. "And we're going to come back and get the rest."

With debate focusing on dollars, critics have complained that not much is known about what is in the proposal, as it hasn't been finalized amid behind-the-scenes negotiations. There's been little insight for the public into what it ultimately could entail, even as supporters and opponents frequently point to polls showing mixed results on its popularity.

Adam Silver says Las Vegas on list for consideration if NBA expands

  Adam Silver says Las Vegas on list for consideration if NBA expands Las Vegas is in a strong position, but will the NBA choose to expand?Las Vegas has proven it can support professional sports and fill buildings. And if the NBA decides to expand — still a big “if” — it may have a team in Las Vegas as well.

Paid family leave or a dedicated corps to address the climate crisis? Universal pre-kindergarten or expanded health care benefits for Medicare patients? Free community college or continuing the child tax credit? Democrats in Washington are finding themselves at a crucial negotiating point as they try to figure out how to whittle down a partisan, massive expansion of the social safety net .

Senate Democrats have unveiled a draft budget resolution that maps .5 trillion in spending, including for paid medical leave, two years of tuition-free community college, and a bevy of climate change fighting initiatives. Senate Budget Committee Chairman Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) released the The budget also calls for giving legal status to millions of people living in the United States illegally and—in a step aimed to win support from moderate Democrats —spending money to strengthen border security. Notably absent from the resolution are plans for raising the debt ceiling, a measure that would give

Progressive Democrats have resisted efforts to decrease the $3.5 trillion cost, arguing they wanted to go even higher, while moderate Democrats say it's too costly and have been trying to negotiate a lower amount.

This week, the Congressional Progressive Caucus released a new proposal that all programs remain in the package but funded for less than the 10 years initially proposed, forcing lawmakers to later reauthorize popular programs.

"This bill offers us a chance to fundamentally transform the relationship between the American people and their government," they wrote in a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

The measure has been linked to a separate $1 trillion infrastructure bill that would provide federal funding to upgrade roads, bridges, broadband internet, ports and other long-neglected needs.

Progressive Democrats in the House have said they won't vote to advance the infrastructure bill, which has already passed the Senate, until the larger economic plan made up of their priorities passes. Moderate Democrats, including U.S. Senators Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, have pushed for the House to pass the infrastructure bill before finalizing a package on the larger bill.

Bernie Sanders, Pramila Jayapal Insist There's No Divide Between Progressives, Moderates

  Bernie Sanders, Pramila Jayapal Insist There's No Divide Between Progressives, Moderates "When you've got 48 people who want to do something and two who don't," then "it is not a 50-50 compromise," the Vermont senator said.Senators Joe Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, and Kyrsten Sinema, an Arizona Democrat, have emerged as the primary opponents to Biden's "human infrastructure" reconciliation bill. While a few other moderates have expressed concerns with the high price tag—initially $3.5 trillion—and specific provisions within the legislation, most Democratic lawmakers have backed the bill to accomplish the bulk of the president's agenda.

I also do not have a degree. I am 6 credits from an associates degree in Business, I have been working on the Comptia A+ course, and trying to mess around with Azure a little bit when I have time. Since high-school I've always been interested in computers and networking , I just never thought I'd be good enough to make a career in it, but I have built a few custom gaming PCs and helped at my former jobs with some very very simple IT solutions (configuring an ATM with DHCP instead of a Staic adrees to fix connection issues).

If House Democrats follow suit later this month, congressional Democrats this fall hope to draft an expansive package that will carry the remainder of President Biden’s trillion economic agenda. The Senate adopted the measure 50 to 49, minutes before 4 a.m. Mr. Manchin released a statement on Wednesday that raised “serious concerns about the grave consequences facing West Virginians and every American family if Congress decides to spend another .5 trillion.” At the White House, Mr. Biden defended the social spending package against criticism that it would fuel inflation.

Manchin and Sinema's offices didn't respond to Newsweek's requests this week for updates on where they stand, but reports have indicated that they continue talks with the White House.

Pelosi, a California Democrat, this week acknowledged that the $3.5 trillion figure likely will come down and leaned toward $2 trillion as a possible compromise point.

In a letter to colleagues, she wrote that she was hearing from members that they should shift to a plan "to do fewer things well"—meaning drop some of the proposals and maintaining robust versions of the rest, rather than smaller versions of everything proposed.

"I'm very disappointed that we're not going with the original $3.5 trillion, which was very transformative. But whatever we do, we'll make decisions that will continue to be transformative," she told reporters during her weekly briefing. "If there are fewer dollars to spend, there are choices to be made."

Pelosi and supporters of the $3.5 trillion initial offer have called it "transformative" for the breadth of programs and people it will touch.

No economic package? No problem: Even without a budget deal, parties already shaping their messages

  No economic package? No problem: Even without a budget deal, parties already shaping their messages Republicans are casting Democrats as 'tax and spend' elites; Democrats plan to stress specific programs ranging from child care to community collegeTheir success in reaching voters could decide the fate of Joe Biden's presidency and partisan control of Congress.

"The Build Back Better is three baskets. It's climate...health, job security and moral responsibility," she said. "It's health care: the issues that relate to the Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid, and it's family care."

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, a New York Democrat, penned a letter to his caucus on Thursday urging them to bust through the impasse.

"I have said from the beginning that the execution of the two-track legislative strategy for the Bipartisan Infrastructure bill and the Build Back Better Act would be difficult," he wrote.

"To pass meaningful legislation, we must put aside our differences and find the common ground within our party. As with any bill of such historic proportions, not every member will get everything he or she wants."

Related Articles

  • Joe Biden Lobbies Lawmakers at Capitol With Domestic Agenda Hanging On by a Thread
  • Progressives Hold the Key to House Passing Infrastructure, and They're Not Budging Yet
  • Biden's Domestic Agenda on the Line as House Punts Crucial Infrastructure Vote
  • Biden, McConnell Longtime Friendship Tested Over Debt, Agenda
  • 5 Key Factors as Congress Works to Pass Biden's Infrastructure, Social Spending Agenda

Start your unlimited Newsweek trial

Smearing Popularism Does Not Help Black Voters .
Persuasively rebutting David Shor requires scrutinizing his arguments, not stigmatizing them.People like me — city-dwelling college graduates who know what a “Senate parliamentarian” is — comprise an extremely small share of the American population. But we are damn near the only people who earn a living by writing about politics, or helping the Democratic Party win elections.

usr: 0
This is interesting!