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Politics Democrats need a win — now

12:00  24 october  2021
12:00  24 october  2021 Source:   thehill.com

Illinois Democrats look to increase edge with new House maps

  Illinois Democrats look to increase edge with new House maps CHICAGO (AP) — Illinois Democrats are poised to approve new congressional district maps that would give Democratic candidates an advantage in elections over the next decade as their party fights to keep control of the U.S. House in 2022. Democrats who control state government released their proposed maps Friday, and lawmakers are scheduled to meet in Springfield to pass the new maps before the end of the month. The map puts GOP Rep. AdamDemocrats who control state government released their proposed maps Friday, and lawmakers are scheduled to meet in Springfield to pass the new maps before the end of the month.

Democrats need a win — now . By Will Marshall, Opinion Contributor — 10/12/21 10:30 AM EDT. The views expressed by contributors are their own and not the view of The Hill. Democrats control the White House and, however tenuously, Congress. They don’t have the luxury of endless negotiations aimed at appeasing the left. To regain political momentum, Democrats need a win . The best way to get one is to pass the infrastructure bill as soon as possible and work on a pragmatic reconciliation bill that better reflects their philosophically diverse coalition.

We just need to win one. I don't think the dems should obstruct everything like Republicans did a few years ago, but winning either the house or the senate will force Republicans to make concessions if they want stuff to pass, instead of the "lets see how much bullshit we can cram in" method they have been using for the last year. If Democrats do not win this battle, as uphill as it is, and Republicans maintain a majority in the upper chamber, they will do untold damage to the judiciary, lasting generations.

In politics, success tends to beget success. That truism apparently eluded leftwing Democrats on Sept. 30 when they refused to vote for President Biden's $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill.

President Biden listens to Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) after a Democratic Caucus meeting at the Capitol to discuss the bipartisan infrastructure plan on Friday, October 1, 2021. © Greg Nash President Biden listens to Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) after a Democratic Caucus meeting at the Capitol to discuss the bipartisan infrastructure plan on Friday, October 1, 2021.

Instead of basking in accolades for having passed a second landmark achievement to go with Biden's $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan, Democrats are treating the public to an extended exhibition of their inability to forge the internal consensus necessary to govern.

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) Now if we do some math: 40% of 49% is about 20%.of the total number of voters who didn’t vote. There’s the magic number that Democrats need in order to win . Previously, I was a solid fan of Amy Klobuchar. Her demonstrated ability to win rural votes is a strong positive. The Democrats lately have done pretty well with charismatic males. I hate to come across as sexist here, but I think the push for Hillary was improperly based on the idea that “we finally elected a black man, now it’s time to elect a woman.” The problem is, people still care about lots of other issues, and are not inspired to vote

Will Democrat 's be able to continue winning in the Midwest after seeing how tight the margins were in 2020? Should Democrat 's make investment in the Sunbelt strategy that includes NC,TX,GA,AZ. Depending on the state of the economy do you think Democrat 's could still pick up the Midwestern states? The Democrats safest bet is to try and rebuild in Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Wisconsin. They also need to continue to building in Nevada and Minnesota. AZ and GA are battleground states now , especially if the voting the can stay elevated. I wouldn't put stock in winning either of those

Even as clogged U.S. ports and long delays in delivering goods of all kinds underscore the urgent need for upgrading the nation's economic infrastructure, the Congressional Progressive Caucus vows to persist in blocking the bill if they don't get their way on a follow-on reconciliation bill that would spend trillions more on new social entitlements and climate protection.

That's sewn anger and mistrust among moderate House Democrats, who were promised a vote and stood ready to pass the infrastructure bill last month. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) set a new deadline for a vote - Halloween, fittingly enough. To arrest the administration's faltering momentum, Democrats need a big political win, and soon.

Buffeted by vaccine hesitancy and the delta variant's surge, as well as the chaotic U.S. exit from Afghanistan, the president's approval ratings have tumbled by 10 points since June. That's a worry for Democratic candidates, especially former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, who's locked in a tight race for a second term in a state Biden won by 10 points in 2020.

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But Democrats need to say it, early, loud and incessantly. How should they do that? Some Democrats have gotten distracted about whether the party should be talking about race or class. None of this means Democrats will need to retreat from their reputation as the party of diversity and inclusivity. As vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris has persistently pointed out, the economic pain so prevalent today falls on many Americans, from young Black men without jobs in cities, to middle-aged white men on disability or opioids, to women of all races stuck in underpaid dead-end “essential” jobs, to gig

If the Democrats don't do it now , then the Republicans will ensure their own rule through rigging democracy to the point where the word democracy wouldn't even apply any more. If the Democrats don't do this, those rights will only be won back from tyrannical Republicans through violent resistance. Democrats need a more effective unifying vision, that includes peeling off fiscal conservatives in novel ways. I’d like to see the filibuster modified, but without having a broad set of fine tools with which to perform surgery on it, I couldn’t expand on what those modifications should look like.

The impasse over infrastructure is odd in two respects. First, progressives claim they too want to spend big on nation-building at home. But it doesn't seem to be their top priority. Their message couldn't be clearer: Redistributing wealth takes precedence over strengthening the economy. Is that really the message Democrats want to run on in next year's midterm elections?

Even more perplexing, the White House, and sometimes the president himself, seemed to encourage leftist obstruction as a way of pressuring two moderate Democratic senators, Joe Manchin (W.Va.) and Kyrsten Sinema (Ariz.), into supporting the $3.5 trillion reconciliation bill.

The strong-arm tactics haven't worked, and have left bruised feelings among not only the senators but also many moderate House Democrats who also don't support the entire progressive wish list. Now the fate of both bills is uncertain as the White House belatedly struggles to broker a compromise that balances the needs of both leftwing and centrist Democrats.

Democrats Stare Into the Abyss

  Democrats Stare Into the Abyss Will the president’s party pass major legislation before the midterm elections?Roughly since the rise of the Delta variant sent COVID-19 caseloads soaring again, the White House and congressional Democrats have faced a debilitating slog of dashed hopes and diminished expectations.

Democrats need a win — now https:// bit.ly/3lyOH2X   Via @ PPI.

"Harvest the Vote: How Democrats Can Win Again in Rural America" by Jane Kleeb. (Allison Hagan/Here & Now ). The urban-rural divide has grown in politics over the past couple of decades, with rural America becoming increasingly and reliably Republican. But Jane Kleeb, chair of the Nebraska Democratic Party, says there are opportunities for Democrats to win back rural voters in local, state and national politics.

What we've witnessed is anything but a deft exercise in coalition management. Despite all the heady rhetoric about ushering in "transformative change," it was never likely that Democrats would pass changes on a New Deal scale with razor-thin majorities in the House and Senate.

What's more, Democrats representing battleground districts and states face electorates that are skeptical of the left's big tax and spending ambitions. Since they make the difference between their party being in the majority or out of power, their values and interests also must be accommodated.

Nonetheless, it's hard not to sympathize with President Biden's desire to "go big" in helping Americans hit hard by the long COVID-19 pandemic and recession. That's a tribute to his empathy, and fortunately for him and the country, it's a goal he can still achieve.

The imperative now is to get both bills unstuck by persuading progressives to compromise on a reconciliation package with a price tag between $1.9 trillion and $2.3 trillion. Democrats need to fashion a more disciplined and focused reconciliation package that aims at doing a few things right rather than throwing money at a plethora of new entitlements.

What's still in the Dem megabill? Cheat sheet on 12 big topics

  What's still in the Dem megabill? Cheat sheet on 12 big topics The child tax credit, free community college, health care provisions and more all look drastically different from what Democrats first envisioned.Promises like free community college are dead altogether. Dreams of paid leave and expanding Medicare to cover dental, vision and hearing are at risk. Originally permanent expansions of Medicaid and the Child Tax Credit will now run for as little as one year.

A blueprint at the Progressive Policy Institute, where I serve as president, sets three core, progressive priorities: supporting working families and children, combating climate change and expanding access to affordable health care for those in need. It would cost roughly $2 trillion and could plausibly be paid for by raising taxes on the wealthy and strengthening federal tax compliance.

A Build Back Better package totaling between $2 trillion and $3 trillion for both bills is within striking distance for Biden and his party. Only on the dreamscape of democratic socialism can spending of that magnitude be considered chump change. By historical standards, it's big change.

The left's latest gambit is to pass all the programs in their original $3.5 trillion grab bag but set them to expire after a few years so they appear less expensive in the Congressional Budget Office's official 10-year score. This is bad policy that would make it easier for a future Republican Congress to simply let programs expire rather than trying to abolish them, as Republicans failed to do with ObamaCare.

"For President Biden's legacy, it's important to make these longer-term investments and not have short-term cliffs," said Rep. Suzan DelBene (D-Wash.), leader of the mainstream New Democrat Coalition.

The "haircut" gimmick is also dubious politics, because it's harder to communicate to voters a clear rationale for a jumble of smallish or temporary new programs than a few big initiatives with real power to change lives.

Democrats control the White House and, however tenuously, Congress. They don't have the luxury of endless negotiations aimed at appeasing the left. To regain political momentum, Democrats need a win. The best way to get one is to pass the infrastructure bill as soon as possible and work on a pragmatic reconciliation bill that better reflects their philosophically diverse coalition.

Will Marshall is president and founder of the Progressive Policy Institute (PPI).

How Sinema and Manchin are blocking a new Democratic consensus on Biden bills .
It's hard to see amid the stormy conflict with Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema, but the elongated Democratic standoff over President Joe Biden's economic agenda shows how far the party consensus has moved toward a more aggressive role for government than during the presidencies of Bill Clinton or even Barack Obama. © AFP/Getty Images The intractable disagreements with Manchin and Sinema about the size and scope of the economic package have produced weeks of ugly deadlock among Democrats -- and Manchin's unexpectedly harsh denunciation of the party's sweeping economic development and social safety net bill on Monday points t

usr: 1
This is interesting!